NEW EVENT! An Evening with Guy Davis

7:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 9 at the Majestic Theatre in Corvallis

$12 advance / $15 door. Advance tickets only available online - click here to purchase!

OSU Students FREE with ID. Pick up your ticket in person at Fairbanks Hall 309A/309B Monday-Friday from 8am-5pm. Subject to availability.

Guy Davis once said, “I like antiques and old things, old places, that still have the dust of those who’ve gone before us lying upon them.”  Blowing that dust off just enough to see its beauty is something Guy has excelled at for over twenty years of songwriting and performing.  It’s no wonder his reverence for the music of the Blues Masters who’ve gone before him has been evident in every album he’s ever recorded or concert he’s given. 

Guy has had his musical storytelling influenced by artists like Blind Willie McTell and Big Bill Broonzy, and his musicality from artists as diverse as Lightnin’ Hopkins and Babatunde Olatunji.  However, there’s one man that Guy most credits for his harmonica techniques, by stealing and crediting from him everything that he could, and that man is the legendary Sonny Terry. 

Guy’s new album, “Sonny & Brownie’s Last Train – A Look Back at Brownie McGhee and Sonny Terry” is an homage to these two hugely influential artists, not only on Guy’s career, but to thousands of musicians around the world.  One such artist is the Italian harmonica ace, Fabrizio Poggi, who collaborates with and produced this recording. 

Recorded in the summer of 2016 in Milan, the album features the original, title track song written by Guy Davis, songs by both Sonny and Brownie, as well as songs known to have been recorded and performed by the famed duo written by their contemporaries, such as Libba Cotton and Leadbelly.

Guy and Fabrizio have a relationship going back a decade in which they’ve performed together on tour in Europe and in the United States.  In 2013 Fabrizio produced and played on Guy’s highly acclaimed recording, “Juba Dance”, which was number one on the Roots Music Charts for eight weeks.  And ‘Fab’ also performs on Guy’s last album, “Kokomo Kidd”.

Guy Davis has spent his musical life carrying his message of the blues around the world, from the Equator to the Arctic Circle, earning him the title “An Ambassador of the Blues”.  His work as an actor, author, and music teacher earmark him as a renaissance man of the blues.  What music and acting have in common, he explains, is that I don’t like people to see the hard work and the sweat that goes into what I do. I want them to hear me and be uplifted. And I want some little eightyearold kid in the front row to have big eyes and say, Hey, I want to do that!’.

Hosted by OSU Performing Arts Director Bob Santelli.

For more info on Guy Davis: http://www.guydavis.com  Photo by: Joseph A. Rosen

American Strings participates in Corvallis Arts for All. When tickets are still available on the evening of the performance, SNAP participants with an Oregon Trail card may purchase up to two tickets for $5 each at the door. No advance purchase.

For accommodations relating to a disability please contact 541-737-4671, preferably at least one week in advance.

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PAST PERFORMANCES IN THE AMERICAN STRINGS SERIES

An Evening with Bill Frisell

7:30 p.m. Friday, February 16 at the Oregon State University Memorial Union

FREE to attend. RSVP required.

Guitarist Bill Frisell is one of the most sought-after voices in contemporary music, blending genres as diverse as country, jazz, rock and blues. Since the 1980s he has contributed to the work of such collaborators as Paul Motian, John Zorn, Elvis Costello, Ginger Baker, The Los Angeles Philharmonic, Suzanne Vega, Loudon Wainwright III, Van Dyke Parks, Vic Chesnutt, Rickie, Lee Jones, Ron Sexsmith, Vinicius Cantuária, Marc Johnson (in "Bass Desires"), Ronald Shannon Jackson and Melvin Gibbs (in "Power Tools"), Marianne Faithful, John Scofield, Jan Garbarek, Lyle Mays, Vernon Reid, Julius Hemphill, Paul Bley, Wayne Horvitz, Hal Willner, Robin Holcomb, Rinde Eckert, The Frankfurt Ballet, film director Gus Van Sant, David Sanborn, David Sylvian, Petra Haden and numerous others, including Bono, Brian Eno, Jon Hassell and Daniel Lanois on the soundtrack for Wim Wenders' film Million Dollar Hotel

The New Yorker notes, “Bill Frisell plays the guitar like Miles Davis played the trumpet: in the hands of such radical thinkers, their instruments simply become different animals. And, like Davis, Frisell loves to have a lot of legroom when he improvises--the space that terrifies others quickens his blood."

The breadth of such performing and recording situations is a testament not only to his singular guitar conception, but his musical versatility as well. This, however, is old news by now. In recent years, it is Frisell's role as composer and band leader which has garnered him increasing notoriety.

Hosted by OSU Performing Arts Director Bob Santelli.

 

An Evening with Country Joe McDonald: Reflections on the Summer of Love and Woody Guthrie

 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 15 at the Majestic Theatre in Corvallis

“An Evening with Country Joe McDonald: Reflections on the Summer of Love and Woody Guthrie,” a performance and question-and-answer session with singer-songwriter Country Joe McDonald is part of the Oregon State University College of Liberal Arts’ “American Strings Series,” which celebrates America’s longstanding love for stringed instruments and roots music. The series was created by OSU’s director of performing arts, journalist and music historian Bob Santelli.
 
With 36 albums published and more than four decades as a touring folk singer, McDonald is one of the best-known Woodstock artists still performing today.
 
Appearing with his band as “Country Joe and the Fish,” McDonald performed at the Monterey Pop Festival in the “Summer of Love,” in 1967. Two years later, he launched his solo career at Woodstock. At Woodstock he played a 30-minute set that included the “Fish Cheer” and the satirical anti-Vietnam War song, “I-Feel-Like-I’m-Fixin’-To-Die Rag,” with the familiar chorus, “One, two, three, what are fighting for?” These became famous auditory icons of the historic music festival and anthems for Vietnam veterans and anti-war protesters of the 1960’s and 1970’s.
 
Throughout the 1970’s and 1980’s McDonald, a veteran himself, toured and released numerous recordings and began actively working with and for Vietnam Veterans Against the War and other causes to support and promote awareness of the thousands of U.S. veterans he felt had been disenfranchised and neglected after returning from active duty.
 
McDonald has continued to write and record and toured regularly in the U.S. and abroad into the new millennium. After some unsuccessful attempts at reuniting the original Country Joe and the Fish band, he formed the Country Joe Band with original members David Bennett Cohen, Bruce Barthol and Gary “Chicken” Hirsh. The group toured throughout 2004 and 2005. In 2007 he perfected his “Tribute to Woody Guthrie” show, a mix of music and spoken word, and has since taken it around the country.
 

For more info on Country Joe: http://www.countryjoe.com/   Photo by: Steve Read

 

An Evening with Tony Trischka

American Strings Tony Trischka

  THREE EVENTS WITH TONY TRISCHKA

  OCTOBER 11TH - PERFORMANCE AND Q&A

  OCTOBER 12TH, 4 PM - FREE BANJO WORKSHOP WITH TONY TRISCHKA

  OCTOBER 12TH, 8 PM - FREE JAM SESSION WITH TONY TRISCHKA

  In this inaugral event of the College of Liberal Arts' new American Strings Series, join renowned banjo artist Tony Trischka for an intimate performance and Q&A at the Majestic       Theatre, 115 SW 2nd Street, Corvallis.

 A sought-after teacher, producer and recording artist, Trischka has collaborated with Steve Martin, Earl Scruggs, Bela Fleck, Pete Seeger, Bill Evans and many more. His     groundbreaking, innovative stylings have inspired generations of bluegrass and acoustic musicians, and made him one of the most influential banjo players in roots music.

  Full biography courtesy tonytrischka.com

  "...the man who made the banjo bigger, jazzier and more wordly..."
  Tom Ashbrook, NPR's "On Point"