Catalog and Schedule:
English

Catalog and Schedule:
Film

Catalog and Schedule:
Writing

 

Course Descriptions
 Spring 2017:
English

Course Descriptions
Spring 2017:
Film

Course Descriptions
Spring 2017:
Writing

Winter 2017

Spring 2017

Winter 2017

Spring 2017

Winter 2017

Spring 2017

 


ENG 100 Level
ENG 200 Level
ENG 300 Level
ENG 400 Level
ENG Graduate Courses

FILM 100 Level
FILM 200 Level
FILM 400 Level
FILM Graduate Courses

WR 100 Level
WR 200 Level
WR 300 Level
WR 400 Level
WR Graduate Courses

Spring Course Descriptions Cover   Download the Spring Term 2017 Course Descriptions Booklet

Spring 2017 Course Descriptions: English

Course Name: ENG 104: Introduction to Literature: Fiction
Section: 1
CRN: 50473
Instructor Name: Malewitz, Raymond
Time: M W F 1200-1250
Instructor Office Hours: M W 1500-1550
Office Location (in Moreland): 340
Course Description: This course offers a rapid introduction to fiction—the central genre of literary studies.  The key questions that we will ask concern the ways that we might categorize the large and heterogeneous output of Western literary artists over the last two centuries.  We will examine the ways that American and European authors position themselves within regional, national, and international cultures.  We will examine the strategies by artists draw upon or depart from the forms, themes, and styles of their literary ancestors.  Finally, we will explore relationship between literature and cultural studies through discussions of race, class, gender, and sexuality. 
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Literature and the Arts
Course Name: ENG 104: Introduction to Literature: Fiction
Section: TBA
CRN: TBA
Instructor Name: Elbom, Gilad
Time: Ecampus
Instructor Office Hours: M W F 1400-1450
Office Location (in Moreland): 232
Course Description: Through a close reading of influential works of fiction, this class will explore a variety of literary elements: setting, characters, plot, conflict, motives, emotions, language, style, themes, point of view, and other techniques, devices, and components. We will discuss the conventions of fiction, observe innovative modes of writing, and examine fiction in larger contexts: historical, comparative, structural, theological, modernist, postmodern, psychological, philosophical, feminist, postcolonial, and so on. We will begin with a selection of short stories and end with a famous novel: Mist by Miguel de Unamuno, a tragicomic romance that illuminates the mechanisms of fiction itself and raises interesting questions about reality and the imagination, God and humanity, author and authorship, and the interplay of writers, fictitious characters, and readers. 
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Literature and the Arts
Course Name: ENG 104: Introduction to Literature: Fiction
Section: 2
CRN: TBA
Instructor Name: Scribner, Keith
Time: T R 1200-1320
Instructor Office Hours: W 1500-1700
Office Location (in Moreland): 308
Course Description: In this course we will read short stories and two novels.  As we proceed through the term, our focus will be on close reading and how these works achieve aesthetic and emotional affect through fictional craft, such as plot, character, setting, voice, and symbolism. Course outcomes will include developing skills in textual analysis, close reading, and critical thinking and writing.  We'll examine these works for their historical, literary, social, and political significance, as well as their varying styles and themes, keeping in mind that they are first and foremost works of art.

"The value of great fiction...is not just that it entertains us or distracts us from our troubles, not just that it broadens our knowledge of people and places, but also that it helps us to know what we believe, reinforces those qualities that are noblest in us, leads us to feel uneasy about our faults and limitations." - John Gardner, The Art of Fiction
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Literature and the Arts
Course Name: ENG 104: Introduction to Fiction
Section: 400
CRN: 53887
Instructor Name: Larison, John
Time: Ecampus
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Office Location (in Moreland): 306
Course Description: Introduction to Fiction offers you a chance to read, ponder, and explore some of the most influential short stories of the last century. Specifically, we'll be focusing our explorations on issues of theme, context, and craft. Expect an inspiring and intellectually rigorous class, one in which you will produce several short writing assignments and two papers. Students will read several short stories, as well as one award-winning novel written in the last few years.  Students will write short informal assignments each week that will help them learn to make precise claims, support those claims with quotes from the text, and analyze those quotes to persuade a skeptical reader that you are correct. These skills will then be assessed by formal assignments, specifically an exam and a final paper.  
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Literature and the Arts
Course Name: ENG 106: Introduction to Poetry
Section: 2
CRN: 52413
Instructor Name: Biespiel, David
Time: T R 10-1120
Instructor Office Hours: TBA
Office Location (in Moreland): 228
Course Description: For centuries the reading and discussion of poetry has been required learning for an educated person. Not only that, there are many people throughout the world who reads poems frequently, even daily. To read poems for ten weeks in EN 106 with a group of fellow students from across the university, students with diverse majors and life experiences, is to participate in the highest ideals of your liberal arts education. It is to pursue appreciation for the basic human experience of metaphor and to enjoy thinking imaginatively, critically, and creatively for its own sake. EN 106 is less about solving the meaning of poems and more about exploring the questions of life that poems enter (and looking at how poems do that, too). With focus on the experiences of poems, poets, and readers, with focus on the public and private lives that poems explore, with focus on the pleasures of the arrangement of language and metaphor, and with focus on the cultural, social, political, and spiritual subjects that poems explore, students in EN 106 study study poetry.
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Literature and the Arts
Course Name: ENG 106: Introduction to Poetry
Section: 3
CRN: 53875
Instructor Name: Biespiel, David
Time: T R 0830-0950
Instructor Office Hourse: TBA
Office Loation: 228
Course Desription: For centuries the reading and discussion of poetry has been required learning for an educated person. Not only that, there are many people throughout the world who reads poems frequently, even daily. To read poems for ten weeks in EN 106 with a group of fellow students from across the university, students with diverse majors and life experiences, is to participate in the highest ideals of your liberal arts education. It is to pursue appreciation for the basic human experience of metaphor and to enjoy thinking imaginatively, critically, and creatively for its own sake. EN 106 is less about solving the meaning of poems and more about exploring the questions of life that poems enter (and looking at how poems do that, too). With focus on the experiences of poems, poets, and readers, with focus on the public and private lives that poems explore, with focus on the pleasures of the arrangement of language and metaphor, and with focus on the cultural, social, political, and spiritual subjects that poems explore, students in EN 106 study study poetry.
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Literature and the Arts
Course Name: ENG 106: Introduction to Literature: Poetry 
Section: 4
CRN: 55098
Instructor Name: Brock, Isabelle
Time: Hybrid: Tuesday 1400-1520
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1300-1400
Office Location (in Moreland): 232
Course Description: ENG 106 is a 3 credit course that introduces students to literature, with a particular focus on poetry. In this class, we will read, think about, write about, and discuss a wide variety of poems, and we’ll think critically about poetic choices, contexts, and styles. Class discussions and learning activities, exploratory assignments focusing on specific elements of poetry, and guided reading responses make up a significant part of your grade. Quizzes and a final exam allow you to illuminate the understanding you’ve gained.
 
This section of ENG 106 is a hybrid course, and approximately 50% of the course will take place in a traditional face-to-face classroom and 50% will be delivered through Canvas, our online learning platform. In our online learning community, you will access learning materials, complete and submit assignments, take quizzes, and interact with your classmates and with the instructor through the discussion board.
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Literature and the Arts
Course Name: ENG 106: Introduction to Literature: Poetry 
Section: 400
CRN: 54741
Instructor Name: Brock, Isabelle
Time: Ecampus
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1300-1400
Office Location (in Moreland): 232
Course Description: ENG 106 is a 3 credit course that introduces students to literature, with a particular focus on poetry. In this class, we will read, think about, write about, and discuss a wide variety of poems, and we’ll think critically about poetic choices, contexts, and styles. Class discussions and learning activities, exploratory assignments focusing on specific elements of poetry, and guided reading responses make up a significant part of your grade. Quizzes and a final exam allow you to illuminate the understanding you’ve gained.
 
This section of ENG 106 is a hybrid course, and approximately 50% of the course will take place in a traditional face-to-face classroom and 50% will be delivered through Canvas, our online learning platform. In our online learning community, you will access learning materials, complete and submit assignments, take quizzes, and interact with your classmates and with the instructor through the discussion board.
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Literature and the Arts
Course Name: ENG 106H: Introduction to Literature: Poetry
Section: 1
CRN: 59352
Instructor Name: Vicki Tolar Burton
Time: TH 1200-1320
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1330-1430
Office Location (in Moreland): 210
Course Description: English 106H, Introduction to Poetry, provides a general introduction to the study of poetry in a way that is accessible to students in all majors.  Emphasis is placed not only on the essential elements of interpreting poetry but also on the value of poetry for our lives and our society. We will especially focus on how a poem works, and you will gain practice in analyzing and interpreting poems, mostly British and American, from a wide range of time periods and styles. You will also learn strategies for using informal and formal writing as modes of developing critical thinking. Students are not required to write poetry in this class, but rather we will focus on close reading and understanding of texts. 
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Literature and the Arts
Course Name: ENG 107: Introduction to Creative Nonfiction
Section: 1
CRN: 58190
Instructor Name: Passarello, Elena
Time: T R 1600-1720
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1500-16003
Office Location (in Moreland): 342
Course Description: This course covers over a millennium of the nonfiction essay, looking as far back as ancient Rome and up to the world of contemporary graphic memoir. Our guiding question for these ten weeks will be "What is an essay?", and we will note how it differs from the non-literary essays we may have encountered in other parts of our lives. Our texts for this investigation include personal essays, researched public narratives, criticism, and memoirs, and in encountering them, we will interrogate the ways an essayist's specific attention to form, scene, and commentary contribute to reader experience and to our understanding of the facts of our world.  
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Literature and the Arts
Course Name: ENG 200: Library Skills for Literary Study
Section: 1
CRN: 57721
Instructor Name: McElroy, Kelly
Time: W 1100-1150 4/3/17-5/10/17
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1400-1600
Instructor Office Location: LIB 2511
Course Description: In this course, we will look at the topic of “library skills” broadly. We will spend time learning how to find and use resources from the OSU Libraries’ collections and will think about various issues related to information. We will look at how information is organized in these (and other) collections – knowledge you can use to unlock any collection of information, in a library, on the web, or in an archive. We will also explore how to learn from and integrate primary sources (materials from Special Collections and Archives) into our research; we will examine the expertise, authority and credibility of those who create the information we use; we will learn about fair use and the rights we have to information we create and consume. We will also consider the social, political and economic aspects of information and knowledge production to better understand today’s information society.
Course Name: ENG 202: Shakespeare
Section: 1
CRN: 59298
Instructor Name: Barbour, Richmond
Time: M W F 1200-1250
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Instructor Office Location (in Moreland): 322
Course Description: This course treats five plays from the second half of Shakespeare’s career, the Jacobean phase. Our central concern is the careful reading of Shakespeare’s texts. The primary aim is to sharpen everyone’s skills as readers and interpreters of Shakespeare’s work and its cultural energies. Our concerns will range from language, characterization, family dynamics, social relations, class relations, gender, genre (comedy, tragedy, tragi-comedy), and staging to wider questions of Shakespeare’s involvement in the economic, political, theatrical, and popular cultures of his day and ours.  Our sessions will combine lecture and discussion, readings and viewings. Students are expected to keep pace with a challenging syllabus and contribute to discussion.
Course Name: ENG 202: Shakespeare
Section: 1
CRN: 56809
Instructor Name: Bude, Tekla
Time: T R 1600-1720
Instructor Office Hours: T W 1200-1300
Office Location (in Moreland): 320
Course Description: This course is an introduction to the second half of Shakespeare's career, and will focus on close-reading Shakespeare's language and analyzing his plays and poetry. How do Shakespeare's later plays reflect his cultural, historical, and literary context? How, alternatively, might these plays be made relevant to, or comment on, today? We will begin the term by reading a selection of Shakespeare's sonnets, and from there we will read four plays (two tragedies, a comedy, and a history play).  Through our reading, we will focus on problems of genre and form, class and race, nation and empire, gender and sex, and material textual history as well as performance theory. Class will include discussion, lecture, readings, and viewings.
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Western Culture, Literature and the Arts
Course Name: ENG 206: Survey of British Lit: Victorian Era to Twentieth Century
Section: 1
CRN: 58194
Instructor Name: Ward, Megan
Time: MWF 0900-0950
Instructor Office Hours: M W 1430-1600
Office Location (in Moreland): 302
Course Description: Find out the backstory for some of contemporary literature's most pressing issues. By surveying British literature from the Victorian period to today, we will explore important questions about colonial and postcolonial literature, gender politics, science and technology, and race and national identity. Along the way, we'll define four major periods of literature (Victorian, modernist, post-modern, and contemporary) and ask whether and why each piece seems to fit the characteristics of its period. Together, these periods tell a story about how and why the British Empire ballooned during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and what happens to English literature in its aftermath.
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Western Culture, Literature and the Arts
Course Name: ENG 210: Literatures of the World: Asia
Section: 400
CRN: 59903
Instructor Name: Fearnside, Jeff
Time: Ecampus
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Office Location (in Moreland): N/A
Course Description: Utilizing multiple perspectives—cultural, geographical, historical, linguistic, political, religious, structural, stylistic, thematic, and other points of view—students read, discuss, analyze, and write about representative works of poetry, prose, and drama from Asia, with a special emphasis on the literatures of countries along the Silk Road. Texts will be examined in a comparative context and analyses expanded with the help of secondary sources. Involves reading modern and contemporary authors, formal writing assignments involving research, lectures, moderated discussions, and online activities.
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Cultural Diversity, Literature and the Arts
Course Name: ENG 212: Literatures of the World: Meso/South America, Carribean
Section: 1
CRN: 59299
Instructor Name: Christina Leon
Time: TR 1200-1320
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1430-1530
Office Location (in Moreland): 236
Course Description: In this class, we will explore a range of authors and writings from Latin America.  The course will start with the late 19th century and working through to the 21st century. We will survey literary movements such as: the cosmopolitan Modernismo movement, the Boom novel, avant-garde literatures, and contemporaneous experimental literary pieces.  As we read through poetry, prose, and plays, we will consider the multiple aesthetic, historical, and political movements across nations that help to shape the Latin American literary worlds and give us a broadened, hemispheric understanding of what we call "America."
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Cultural Diversity, Literature and the Arts
Course Name: ENG 213: Literatures of the World: The Middle East
Section: 1
CRN: 58191
Instructor Name: Elbom, Gilad
Time: MWF 1600-1650
Instructor Office Hours: M W F 1400-1450
Office Location (in Moreland): 232
Course Description: This class will focus on modern Middle Eastern literature from multiple perspectives: cultural, political, religious, historical, geographical, linguistic, structural, stylistic, thematic, comparative, and other points of view. The texts on our reading list include a postmodern Palestinian novel, a stream-of-consciousness narrative from Egypt, innovative and controversial poetry in Hebrew, a curious bildungsroman from Yemen, and a surrealistic, hallucinatory, self-deceptive novel from Iran. We will also watch and analyze several Middle Eastern movies. Among the topics we will discuss are different languages and dialects of the Middle East, different national and cultural categories, and the idea that the distinctions between these categories are often fluid and dynamic. We will also try to establish connections between Middle Eastern narratives and global cultural and intellectual ideas.
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Cultural Diversity, Literature and the Arts
Course Name: ENG 220: Difference, Power, and Discrimination: Sexuality in Film
Section: 1
CRN: 56204
Instructor Name: St. Jacques, Jillian
Time: M W F 0900-0950 and M 1800-2050
Instructor Office Hours: F 1000-1100
Office Location: 352
Course Description: Course participants concentrate on articulating their own viewpoints concerning the social construction and distribution of difference, power and discrimination in contemporary cinema. By closely analyzing the ways in which an array of films depict sexualities for multifarious political and libidinal ends, ENG/FILM220 participants evaluate the intersection of sex, class, race and age through a variety of genres, nationalities and periods. Beginning with films that centralize tropes of heterosexual normalcy, such as Alfred Hitchcockʼs Vertigo (1958), students evaluate films such as Thelma & Louise, Brokeback Mountain, Ma Vie en Rose and Boys Donʼt Cry. Along with learning to closely read films, students make connections with diverse and even oppositional theories, including but not limited to psychoanalytic, feminist, (post)feminist, post-structural and queer theories. This transdisciplinary mélange serves as a basis for research, writing, group discussion and personal reflection.
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Difference, Power, and Discrimination
Course Name: ENG 254: Survey of American Literature: 1900 to the present
Section: 400
CRN: 57758
Instructor Name: Schwartz, Sam
Time: Ecampus
Instructor Office Hours: T R 0100-0150 and by appointment
Office Location (in Moreland): 300
Course Description: This course provides a broad background for both majors and non-majors in United States literature from 1900 to the present. We'll begin with the important transitional period of the late 1890s,  when "Naturalist" writers like Frank Norris and Theodore Dreiser began to imagine new relationships between literary art, biological destiny, and technological modernity; this set the stage for the modernist revolution that spanned both world wars and its late-century counterpart, postmodernism. We'll read short stories, poems, and one short novel. Because this is an ecampus course, students will engage with texts in sometimes unconventional ways, though at its heart, reading, analysis, and discussion comprise most of the course's activity.
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Western Culture, Literature and the Arts
Course Name: ENG 275: The Bible as Literature
Section: 400
CRN: 55731
Instructor Name: Elbom, Gilad
Time: Ecampus
Instructor Office Hours: M W F 1400-1450
Office Location (in Moreland): 232
Course Description: Emphasizing variety rather than unity, the Bible is a vast collection of literary genres: stories, poems, genealogies, biographies, prophesies, aphorisms, laws, letters, and many other styles. This class will focus primarily on narrative. Paying attention to a variety of literary techniques, we will try to address the complexity and richness of the Bible rather than reduce it to one truth, a single message, or important lessons. In other words, our approach will be critical and analytical, not didactic. We will try to broaden and deepen our understanding of the Bible through a careful reading of the text and a close inspection of biblical commentary. Ultimately, we will try to approach the Bible from as many perspectives as possible: literary, political, social, theological, linguistic, historical, psychological, feminist, structural, postcolonial, and other points of view.
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Western Culture, Literature and the Arts
Course Name: ENG 311: Studies in British Prose
Section: 1
CRN: 59300
Instructor Name: Ward, Megan
Time: MWF 1200-1250
Instructor Office Hours: M W 0230-0400
Office Location (in Moreland): 302
Course Description:

This course will focus on reading just one novel: George Eliot's Middlemarch. Virginia Woolf famously said that Middlemarch is “one of the few English novels written for grown-up ­people," and we will immerse ourselves in the novel and its contexts. Often called the best nineteenth-century novel and a classic example of British realism, Middlemarch offers the opportunity to learn about novelistic form and its historical contexts, including science, nature, religion, and politics. Because this is a WIC course, we'll use our reading of Middlemarch as an opportunity to learn more about writing for the English major, including creating an annotated edition of Middlemarch, journalling, and writing essays. 

*Writing Intensive Course (WIC)

Course Name: ENG 318: The American Novel: Modernist Period
Section: 1
CRN: 59401
Instructor Name: Davison, Neil
Time: T R 0830-0950
Instructor Office Hours: T R 2-4
Office Location (in Moreland): 230
Course Description: This is a survey of the American novel from the turn of the century to the 1930's. During this era the Western novel was influenced by such new schools of writing as Naturalism, Impressionism/Symbolism, and Surrealism, with seminal works synthesizing these into a new 20th century aesthetics known as High Modernist or avant-garde formalism. This was also the period of the novel that in content witnessed the rise of voices on the margins of Western cultural production, such as those of women, African-Americans, Queer, and Jewish writers. Some of these novels of gender, class, racial, and ethnic difference adopted Modernist experimental techniques while others remained tied to versions of Realism. Aside from understanding the particular thematic thrust of each novel, we will examine individual works as examples of the content and form of the various schools mentioned above. Students will be evaluated through a take-home mid-term, a term paper, and a final in-class essay exam.   
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Western Culture, Literature and the Arts
Course Name: ENG 319: The American Novel: Post-WWII
Section: 1
CRN: 50482
Instructor Name: Elbom, Gilad
Time: M W F 1500-1550 
Instructor Office Hours: M W F 1400-1450
Office Location (in Moreland): 232
Course Description: The novels we will read and discuss in this class, each in its own way, offer unique, original, often surprising perspectives on the trauma of World War II, life in America, and the mechanisms of language and literature. In Wise Blood, a young ex-soldier returns from the war to challenge common concepts of sin, faith, sincerity, redemption, personal convictions and commercial enterprise, self-sacrifice and mass deception. His Own Where, a coming-of-age novel written in Black English, calls attention to the fact that domestic sociopolitical struggles may be much harder to win or resolve than major international conflicts. How German Is It examines familiar notions in new contexts: history, family, national character, intimate relations, and the very idea of fiction. In similar ways, Under the Shadow is a postmodern investigation of form and content, unity and fragmentation, reality and the imagination.
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Western Culture, Literature and the Arts
Course Name: ENG 320: Studies in Page, Stage, and Screen: The Power of Music in Literature
Section: 1
CRN: 59302
Instructor Name: Bude, Tekla
Time: T R 1000-1120
Instructor Office Hours: T W 1200-1300
Office Location (in Moreland): 320
Course Description: In this course, we will look at the powerful connection between music and literature, from the earliest recorded poems to contemporary hip-hop.
How do writing and music interact with each other, and how do periodization, form, and genre change or put stress on the relationship of music to words?

What does it mean when Shakespeare has Ophelia break into song as she is going mad in Hamlet? What do the mysterious lyrics written by Sappho in Ancient Greece have to tell us about love in the modern world? In the myth of Orpheus, the hero uses music to charm the beasts of hell; how does music tame wild things, and does it really work?

While this course will approach music from the perspective of literature (Ovid, Shakespeare, William Blake, and Toni Morrison, for example), we will spend much of our time listening to music, too, from Ancient Greek papyrii to Mozart to blues and the Wu-Tang Clan. 
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Western Culture, Literature and the Arts
Course Name: ENG 321: Word, Object, and Image: Fashion and Fiction
Section: 1
CRN: 59303
Instructor Name: Sheehan, Elizabeth
Time: M W F 1100-1150
Instructor Office Hours: M W 1500-1600
Office Location (in Moreland): 234
Course Description:

In the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, fashion has been vital to fiction and vice versa. In fiction, for example, descriptions of dress help to set a scene, while certain fashions invite consumers to create particular narratives about themselves and the world. This course explores the relationship between fashion and fiction with a focus on British and U.S. literature and dress since 1900. Central questions for the course include: What are the similarities and differences between how garments, texts, and bodies are read? What connections emerge between different sartorial and literary styles? What can representations and theories about subcultures, tastes, and marketing in the global fashion system help us to understand about the production and consumption of fiction?

Special Topic: Fashion and Fiction

Bacc Core Fulfillment: Literature and the Arts
Course Name: ENG 330: The Holocaust in Literature and Film
Section: 1
CRN: 55761
Instructor Name: Davison, Neil
Time: T R 1200-1320
Instructor Office Hours: T R 2-4
Office Location (in Moreland): 230
Course Description: In this course we will study fiction, memoir, and films that attempt to re-imagine and gain insight into why and how the Holocaust occurred, especially surrounding the Nazi racist new world order that, in its own terminology, would be cleansed of Jews. We will learn through supplementary documents about the history of European Jewry, religious-based anti-Jewishness, and political racial anti-Semitism. We will position the Holocaust in the context of the racial pseudo-science of the era, and through this, grapple with how pervasive race and racial hierarchy was, or even remains, to the Western mind. Through the texts studied, we will consider the controversy of the uniqueness of the Holocaust in terms of other mass murders before and after it, and whether its particular horrors can ever be justly represented in forms that originated in periods of Western culture preceding it, such as the novel, the short story, poetry, and film.
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Literature and the Arts
Course Name: ENG 345: Introduction to Literary Criticism and Theory
Section: 1
CRN: 53615
Instructor Name: Sheehan, Elizabeth
Time: MWF 1400-1450
Instructor Office Hours: M W 1500-1600
Office Location (in Moreland): 234
Course Description: This course introduces students to the most influential movements and methods that shape literary criticism and theory in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, including Marxism, psychoanalysis, structuralism, post-structuralism, feminism, cultural studies, and queer and critical race theories. During the term, students will grapple with transformative ideas about language, form, subjectivity, bodies, knowledge, power, politics, economics, history, gender, sexuality, and race. Students also will practice using various concepts, theories and methods to analyze and interpret literary texts.
Course Name: ENG 375: Children's Literature
Section: 400
CRN: 59888
Instructor Name: Braun, Clare
Time: Ecampus
Instructor Office Hours: M W 1400-1450, and by appt
Office Location (in Moreland): 136
Course Description: This course surveys a variety of genres, which may include fairy tales, folktales, fables, nonsense poetry, picture books, historical and fantasy novels, examining how these texts represent childhood and connect with historical, cultural, and psychological contexts. What counts as children's literature? Is its purpose to entertain, to socialize, to indoctrinate, or something else?  In this class, we will tackle these questions (and more) as we examine the development of children's literature over time, beginning with the first golden age of the nineteenth century and ending with our current golden age in the twenty-first century.  We will think about how conceptions of childhood have changed over time, shaped by and shaping the literature produced for children. Additionally, we will look at children's literature from the perspective of craft, investigating how literary devices and styles are used by children's authors to influence the child reader in a myriad of ways. 
Course Name: ENG 399: Selected Topics: Career Prep for English Majors
Section: 1
CRN: TBA
Instructor Name: Delf, Liz
Time: T R 1400-1450
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1500-1630
Office Location (in Moreland): 204D
Course Description: English major, huh? What are you going to do with that?

Anything you want! English majors become lawyers, software testers, publishers, social media managers, non-profit outreach specialists, and even (as everyone assumes) teachers. The same skills that you've used to analyze Bleak House and write about Baldwin can help you in the real world, too. As Frank B. Liebold argues in his 2010 article "Where Have All the Jobs Gone?", the current job market requires critical thinking and problem solving skills as much as anything else, and these transferable skill-sets, or competencies, have become the new currency for success and future employability. This class is designed for English majors interested in exploring and preparing for post-graduation career options. You'll consider your own personal strengths and interests, reflect on the English degree and what you've gained, and get real experience and feedback on your resume, cover letter, and LinkedIn profile.
Course Name: ENG 454: Major Authors: To Hell and Back: Dante's Inferno
Section: 1
CRN: 59304
Instructor Name: Anderson, Chris
Time: M W F 1000-1050
Instructor Office Hours: M W F 1100-1150
Office Location (in Moreland): 324
Course Description:

A close reading of Dante's Inferno in relation to the rest of The Divine Comedy and Dante's time and place.  Our emphasis will be on the poem itself and the way it teaches us to read it as we go; on the political critique the poem makes; and on its profound religious ideas. We will also pay attention to the idea of allegory and the subtle ways Dante brings that form alive. Hell isn't so bad, when you know how to read it. In fact, it's great. Allegory isn't so stiff:  Dante's can help us better understand our own lives and culture. Come and join us. In-class freewriting and three shorter essays. 

Special Topic: Dante's Inferno

Course Name: ENG 475: Studies in Criticism: Contemporary Eco-Theory
Section: 1
CRN: 59306
Instructor Name: Gottlieb, Evan
Time: M W F 1100-1150
Instructor Office Hours: M W F 1000-1050
Office Location (in Moreland): 362
Course Description: What does ecological theory look like today -- that is, in our era of posthumanism and the Anthropocene? This course will introduce you to some of the most cutting-edge writing regarding the conceptual, behavioral, and institutional paradigm shifts needed to meet the challenges of a rapidly warming planet. We will focus on theorists and novelists who question some of the basic tenets of Western thinking: the subject-object dichotomy, capitalism as the end of history, human rights as innately given, and the very concept of nature itself. Clearly, the old ways of thinking will no longer suffice; business as usual is not an option. Theorists to be studied include Stacey Alaimo, Felix Guattari, Donna Haraway, and Timothy Morton; we'll also read eco-disaster novels by Margaret Atwood and Jeff Vandermeer.
Course Name: ENG 488: Literature and Pedagogy
Section: 1
CRN: 59308
Instructor Name: Helle, Anita
Time: T R 1600-1720
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Office Location (in Moreland): 244
Course Description: Literature and Pedagogy is designed for students who may be interested in teaching college or secondary literature and culture courses in postmodern learning environments. The course focuses on the following questions: What “knowledges” does the study of literature propose? How can reading strategies promote the engagement of real readers (as opposed to hypothetical, “ideal” readers)  in classrooms? How can reading/writing connections be more fully integrated into the teaching of literature? What are some current and traditional “best practices” for designing literature courses and curriculum? What is the future of integrating new media ecologies and visuality in the study of literature in the classroom? The course will incorporate literature “workshops” designed to be scaled up or down for working with students at different levels.  We will be engaged in working between theory and practice in a variety of literary and ancillary fields (narrative and cognitive theory, cultural and visual studies, reception theory, curricular theory and practice).
Course Name: ENG 498: Women and Literature: Woolf and Morrison
Section: 1
CRN: 59310
Instructor Name: Helle, Anita
Time: T R 1000-1120
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Office Location (in Moreland): 244
Course Description: The writing of Virginia Woolf and Toni Morrison has been linked thematically, aesthetically, and politically through a variety of critical lenses (feminist and cultural theory, modernism, postmodernism, to name only a few).   Morrison has explicitly acknowledged Woolf’s influence in the development of fictional techniques.  Each write’s work (fiction and non-fiction) has been associated with explorations of trauma and social violence, structures of dominance,  narrative complexity, linguistic innovation, and conceptions of beauty.   I hope this will be a productively incongruous pairing, an opportunity to explore multiple fruitful intersections  of comparative modernisms. This course is numbered as an undergrad/grad section, and there will be plenty of reading (5-6 novels and short essays). Coursework includes lively participation in our ongoing discussion. For graduate students, an individual presentation or panel on substantive works of literary theory and/or cultural history, and a paper of middling length will be due at the end. Creative writers will have the option, for the midterm essay assignment, of practicing a fictional technique theorized by the “maker” on one condition— the work could not have been conceived or executed outside the context of the course.  Required coursework will also include traditional literary interpretive essay. A full range of textual interpretive theory is welcome, as are interests in relationships among literature, media and visual culture in mainstream modernist and minoritized contexts. 

Spring 2017 Course Descriptions: Film

Course Name: FILM 220: Difference, Power, and Discrimination: Sexuality in Film
Section: 1
CRN: 56204
Instructor Name: St. Jacques, Jillian
Time: M W F 0900-0950 and M 1800-2050
Instructor Office Hours: TBA
Office Location (in Moreland): 352
Course Description: Course participants concentrate on articulating their own viewpoints concerning the social construction and distribution of difference, power and discrimination in contemporary cinema. By closely analyzing the ways in which an array of films depict sexualities for multifarious political and libidinal ends, ENG/FILM220 participants evaluate the intersection of sex, class, race and age through a variety of genres, nationalities and periods. Beginning with films that centralize tropes of heterosexual normalcy, such as Alfred Hitchcockʼs Vertigo (1958), students evaluate films such as Thelma & Louise, Brokeback Mountain, Ma Vie en Rose and Boys Donʼt Cry. Along with learning to closely read films, students make connections with diverse and even oppositional theories, including but not limited to psychoanalytic, feminist, (post)feminist, post-structural and queer theories. This transdisciplinary mélange serves as a basis for research, writing, group discussion and personal reflection.
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Difference, Power, and Discrimination
Course Name: FILM 245: New American Cinema
Section: 1
CRN: 56109
Instructor Name: Lewis, Jon
Time: T 1800-2200; Th 1600-2000
Instructor Office Hours: T 1200-1400
Office Location (in Moreland): 312
Course Description:

This class will closely examine the important films and filmmakers of post-rating system Hollywood (1968-present). Of additional interest will be the transitions and transformations in the business of developing, producing, distributing, and exhibiting motion pictures in modern Hollywood.Topics and Screenings:

 Francis Coppola Saves Hollywood
The Godfather (Coppola, 1972)
 Auteurism: mise-en-scene
Mean Streets (Scorsese, 1973)
Taxi Driver (Scorsese, 1976)
 Auteurism: post-production and popcorn
American Graffiti (Lucas, 1973)
The Exorcist (Friedkin, 1973)
   Francis Coppola Destroys Hollywood
Apocalypse Now (1979)
  Joel Silver’s New Hollywood
Die Hard (McTiernan, 1988)
The Matrix (Wachowski, 1999)
The Blockbuster
Jurassic Park (Spielberg, 1993)
Star Trek (Abrams, 2009)
 A New American Auteur Cinema
Do the Right Thing (Lee, 1989)
Reservoir Dogs (Tarantino, 1993)
Gender and Genre
The Silence of the Lambs (Demme, 1991)
Fight Club

Special Topic: US Cinema

Bacc Core Fulfillment: Literature and the Arts
Course Name: FILM 245: New American Cinema
Section: 400
CRN: 58185
Instructor Name: Rust, Stephen
Time: Ecampus
Instructor Office Hours: T 930-1100 / F 1030-1200
Office Location (in Moreland): N/A
Course Description:

This class offers an interdisciplinary approach to the subject of youth culture. Students should learn a number of parallel critical approaches central to the following disciplines: film and media studies, sociology, and psychology. Also in play is the critical reading of texts on youth culture: films and novels as well as sociological and psychological studies.

1.    Film and media studies: The class offers about twenty films focusing on youth culture. Students are encouraged to “read” these works as re-presentations of lived experience, translations of teen life as it is lived in the U.S.
2.    Contemporary literature: Readings and discussion of 4 novels about teenagers.
3.    Psychology: This course offers an introduction to adolescent psychology, especially the psycho-social approach popular in the 1960s when youth culture first became a subject of real interest in the psychological community.
4.    Sociology: Students will learn to read (and interrogate) so-called empirical data

Special Topic: US Cinema

Bacc Core Fulfillment: Literature and the Arts
Course Name: FILM 480: Studies in Film, Culture, and Society
Section: 1
CRN: 56812
Instructor Name: Lewis, Jon
Time: T 1800-2200; Th 1600-2000
Instructor Office Hours: T 1200-1400
Office Location (in Moreland): 312
Course Description: This class offers an interdisciplinary approach to the subject of youth culture. Students should learn a number of parallel critical approaches central to the following disciplines: film and media studies, sociology, and psychology. Also in play is the critical reading of texts on youth culture: films and novels as well as sociological and psychological studies.

1. Film and media studies: The class offers about twenty films focusing on youth culture. Students are encouraged to “read” these works as re-presentations of lived experience, translations of teen life as it is lived in the U.S.
2. Contemporary literature: Readings and discussion of 4 novels about teenagers.
3. Psychology: This course offers an introduction to adolescent psychology, especially the psycho-social approach popular in the 1960s when youth culture first became a subject of real interest in the psychological community.
4. Sociology: Students will learn to read (and interrogate) so-called empirical data
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Western Culture, Literature and the Arts

Spring 2017 Course Descriptions: Writing

Course Name: WR 121: Eglish Composition
CRN: See Course Catalog
Instructor Name: Staff
Course Description: WR 121 is designed to help you develop skills and confidence in analytical writing and to strengthen rhetorical awareness—your perception of where, how, and why persuasion is occurring. We envision this course as the beginning of and foundation for your writing development as an undergraduate at OSU. WR 121 places emphasis on the process of writing, including acts of reading, researching, analytical thinking, freewriting, drafting, review, revision, and editing. Complementing this approach is a focus on the final product—quality compositions that demonstrate rhetorical awareness and evidence of critical thinking. Writing in WR 121, then, is approached as both process and product. Writing is an invitation to think and a way to think. It is not only a mode of expression, but also a mode of inquiry and exploration. The skills learned in this course will help you write effectively for situations in your university studies and beyond.
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Writing l
Course Name: WR 201: Writing for Media
Section: 2
CRN: 51633
Instructor Name: St. Jacques, Jillian
Time: M W F 1200-1250
Instructor Office Hours: F 1000-1100
Instructor Office Location (in Moreland): F
Course Description: Since the popularization of the Internet in the 1980s, weʼve witnessed a veritable explosion in media culture. We still have “traditional” media outlets—magazines, newspapers, television, radio—but the advent of interactive media has also given rise to new forms of journalism; instantaneously breaking “citizen reporting” on blogs and podcasts, Twitter feeds and YouTube webcasts. Although these media forms engage different visual and linguistic styles of representation and (sometimes) appear to conform to different rules, the core skill in writing for media remains the ability to generate tight, accurate, insightful stories about real-time events at a momentʼs notice. WR201 students begin the course by learning to formulate headlines, deks and summary leads using the inverted pyramid style. Having gained command of a basic writerʼs toolbox, participants progress to pitching and generating their own reviews, feature stories and profiles.
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
Course Name: WR 201: Writing for Media
Section: 4
CRN: 54162
Instructor Name: St. Jacques, Jillian
Time: M W F 1400-1450
Instructor Office Hours: F 1000-1100
Instructor Office Location (in Moreland): 352
Course Description: Since the popularization of the Internet in the 1980s, weʼve witnessed a veritable explosion in media culture. We still have “traditional” media outlets—magazines, newspapers, television, radio—but the advent of interactive media has also given rise to new forms of journalism; instantaneously breaking “citizen reporting” on blogs and podcasts, Twitter feeds and YouTube webcasts. Although these media forms engage different visual and linguistic styles of representation and (sometimes) appear to conform to different rules, the core skill in writing for media remains the ability to generate tight, accurate, insightful stories about real-time events at a momentʼs notice. WR201 students begin the course by learning to formulate headlines, deks and summary leads using the inverted pyramid style. Having gained command of a basic writerʼs toolbox, participants progress to pitching and generating their own reviews, feature stories and profiles.
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
Course Name: WR 214: Writing in Business
CRN: See Course Catalog
Instructor Name: Staff
Course Description: Thoughtful and thorough communication across multiple audiences and for multiple purposes continues to be an extremely important skill set in business. Writing in Business helps you build these skills and makes use of different networked technologies, software, and online materials in order to broaden your understanding of where, why, and how writing in the workplace happens. You'll learn the principles and practices necessary for writing ethical and effective business letters, memos, and reports for a range of professional contexts. WR 214 will also help you present yourself as a professional, research job opportunities, write materials for job applications, and then land the position you want. The work you'll do in this course is informed by current research in rhetoric and professional writing and is guided by the needs and practices of business, industry, and society at large.
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
Course Name: WR 222: English Composition II: Argumentation
CRN: See Course Catalog
Instructor Name: Staff
Course Description: Argument may seem like a simple word; it’s anything but. One look at the title of your textbook supports that claim. Arguments live in everything we see, think and do. They can be as overt as a Presidential debate and as subtle as a paint color. When you start seeing argumentation in this way, the possibilities are endless. As varied as arguments come, there are tried and true constants in the analysis and crafting of their myriad messages. Arguments are conversations. There is more than one voice in the room. They are grounded in the art of persuasion. They succeed and fail on an understanding of audience. In this course, you will learn the basics of what goes into good argumentative writing through extensive reading, analyzing, brain storming, peer reviewing, revising, debating and (of course) writing. You will develop strategies to help you interpret a variety of texts and compose in a variety of media. This course will show you how a sound argument moves, considering structure, support, and form. You will improve your ability to revise your ideas, the reasoning that supports those ideas, and the writing that illustrates them.
Bacc Core Fulfillment:  Writing ll
Course Name: WR 224: Introduction to Fiction Writing
Section: 2
CRN: 50514
Instructor Name: Griffin, Kristin
Time: T R 1000-1120
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1400-1500 and by appointment
Office Location (in Moreland): 354
Course Description: WR 224 is an introduction to the study and practice of fiction writing. This course focuses exclusively on the analysis and composition of literary short stories. I like to think of the class as having two parts. In Part 1, you will read deeply in the genre and learn the foundations of the craft of fiction writing, including characterization, structure, pacing, tone, dialogue, stakes etc. We will study a diverse selection of published contemporary writers in the genre from ZZ Packer to Jhumpa Lahiri to Maile Meloy. In Part 2, you and your peers take the reigns, as each of you will compose your own pieces of short fiction and the majority of what we read and discuss in class will be your writing. In-class workshops will follow a traditional model and special attention will be paid to the revision process.  
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
Course Name: WR 224: Introduction to Fiction Writing
Section: 4
CRN: 50516
Instructor Name: Davis, Ben
Time: M W F 1000-1050
Instructor Office Hours: M W F 1100-1200 / 1300-1400
Office Location (in Moreland): 360
Course Description: In this course, we will explore the world of literary short fiction. We will read and discuss short stories by contemporary authors that exemplify elements of craft such as character, conflict, perspective, and structure. Keeping these techniques in mind, you will complete frequent in-class writing exercises and produce one polished short story by the end of the term. Your writing will be discussed in a class workshop held during the second half of the course. In response to your work, you will receive written critique letters from your classmates and attend an individual conference with me. Also, as part of a group, you will lead a class discussion on one work of contemporary short fiction during the term. As a community, we will work toward becoming better readers, critics, and writers of literary short fiction. 
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
Course Name: WR 224: Introduction to Fiction Writing
Section: 400
CRN: 52995
Instructor Name: Harrison, Wayne
Time: Ecampus
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Office Location (in Moreland): 306
Course Description: This course examines the basic techniques of fiction, with related writing exercises involving elements such as point of view, characterization, plot, setting, fictional time and dialogue. Students will develop a working vocabulary to discuss literary fiction as they study the work of professional fiction writers and apply the principles of contemporary fiction to their own creative writing. Throughout the term students will participate in weekly writing workshops that will help them revise their own work. Finally, students will submit a complete short story that demonstrates principles and techniques they have studied. 
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
Course Name: WR 239: Introduction to Fiction and Creative Nonfiction
Section: 400
CRN: 58187
Instructor Name: Katz, Tanya
Time: ecampus
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Office Location (in Moreland): 354
Course Description: This class explores how to write good stories, whether real or imagined. We'll read and write both fiction and creative nonfiction, identifying the elements that make stories more vivid, more human, and more true. Students will write short, informal pieces and one longer work in each genre, and will get peer feedback about one story and one essay. In the reading component, we'll look at works in both genres centered around themes: parents and children, friends and lovers, living with death, and telling stories. We'll examine the ways the tools of each genre are used to reveal the heart of the story. In the writing component, students will write one piece in each genre, using techniques from the published pieces we've read. Through this exploration, students will gain a deeper understanding of the ways they can use the elements of good storytelling voice, point of view, characterization, dialogue, setting, and sentence rhythm to bring any story to life, whether true or imagined.
Course Name: WR 241: Hybrid: Introduction to Poetry Writing
Section: 5
CRN: 56960
Instructor Name: Holmberg, Karen
Time: T 1000 - 1120
Instructor Office Hours: M 1100-1200
Office Location (in Moreland): 350
Course Description: In this course you will try your hand at a wide range of poetic techniques, projects, and stances available to poets. In doing so, you will learn to recognize the poetic subject, as well as design a fitting structure for it.  At the end of this course you will turn in a portfolio of 4 poems:  a syllabic riddle poem on an animal or common object, a poem based on a word or phrase, a narrative poem in persona modeled on a character from a fairy tale, myth, art work (visual, literary, film) or from history, and an ars poetica (poem directly or indirectly about the art of poetry). 

In addition, the workshop group will complete two collaborative projects:
1. a linked haiku poem, or renku, and
2. a collection of collaboratively written riddles

This is a hybrid class, which means that half of the class time is replaced with online activities.
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
Course Name: WR 241: Introduction to Poetry Writing
Section: 2
CRN: 51634
Instructor Name: Biespiel, David
Time: T R 1200-1320
intructor Office Hours: TBA
Office Location (in Moreland): 238
Course Description: Writing poems is one of the most difficult joys in the creative arts. How do you make the language you use everyday have special, heightened significance? How do you invent new metaphors? How do you translate your contradictory emotions and complex relationships into poems that can be experienced by others? WR 241 is designed to guide students through the “process of failure” as the route to success in writing poems. With emphasis on developing metaphor, on microscopic observation, on writing poems as an arrangement of life, and on birth, sex, and death, students will write dozens of poems during the term and have their poems shared, discussed, and celebrated.
Bass Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
Course Name: WR 241: Introduction to Poetry Writing
Section: 400
CRN: TBA
Instructor Name: Roush, Stephanie
Time: Ecampus
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Office Location (in Moreland): 358
Course Description: "A poet is, before anything else, a person who is passionately in love with language." - W.H. Auden. In this course, we will explore the poetic craft and immerse ourselves in language as
both readers and writers. This course will provide a firm grounding in the rudiments of poetic craft such as word choice, line breaks, imagery, and sound, as well as an introduction to different forms available to poets. We will consistently work through writing exercises and read the work of various poets in order to aid us in the generation of our own poems. I hope that you will become genuinely attached to the works/words of a few, if not all, of the poets we engage.
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
Course Name: WR 303: Writing for the Web
Section: 1
CRN: 56112
Instructor Name: Ribero, Ana Milena
Time: M W F 1300-1350
Instructor Office Hours: M 1400-1600
Office Location (in Moreland): 318
Course Description: Writing for the Web prepares students to produce engaging, informative, and rhetorically savvy writing for Web-based locations. Students will read, discuss, and write about topics relevant to writing in new media platforms, and will create blogs, websites, and digital stories geared toward online audiences. As a class, we will explore the implications of online writing on politics, ethics, and literacy. Instruction is grounded in rhetorical theory and by current research in digital literacies and multimedia writing practices. As such, this class requires that students read assigned materials carefully and critically, write the assigned responses, and prepare for weekly class discussions. 
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
Course Name: WR 323: English Composition
Section: 400
CRN: 52994
Instructor Name: Peters, Patrick
Time: Ecampus
Instructor Office Hours: T 0900 - 1200
Office Location (in Moreland): N/A
Course Description: Writing and the reading of writing are social processes that encourage the reader to interpret and respond to texts in varied, unique, and often complex ways. Students in English Composition will be asked to read and respond to the work of others (published authors and peers) and compose their own texts with a heightened awareness of style, or the way in which language is used to clearly and gracefully articulate one’s own worldview. Students will be challenged to conceive of and develop their own style, focusing on elements of diction, tone, emphasis, shape and clarity, all while showing an awareness of audience.
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
Course Name: WR 324:  Short Story Writing
Section: 1
CRN: 50517
Instructor Name: Rodgers, Susan
Time: M W F 0900-0950
Instructor Office Hours: M 1000-1100 and R 1400-1500
Office Location (in Moreland): 344
Course Description: Prerequisite: WR 224. In WR 324 students will further develop their understanding of the elements of narrative (plot, point of view, characterization, setting, tone, metaphor, subtext, etc.) both as writer and reader; engage in a range of writing exercises and assignments to develop authentic voice and material for their own short fiction; and hone critical skills, both written and oral. Requirements include informal writing exercises, 3-4 short writing assignments, analyses of readings, and regular quizzes. Students will also participate in small group workshops, and write reviews of their personal stories. The instructor will meet with each student for a conference at least once during the term.
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
Course Name: WR 324: Short Story Writing
Section: 2
CRN: 59318
Instructor Name: Scribner, Keith
Time: T R 1400-1520
Instructor Office Hours: W 1500-1700
Office Location (in Moreland): 308
Course Description: In this course we will study the basic elements of fiction—character, dialogue, point of view, tone, and so on—to further develop our understanding of fictional techniques.  Our class will combine reading, writing, and discussion.  Assignments will include one full-length short story (7-12 pages), a short short, and six writing exercises. In order to understand how fiction is put together—how the raw material of inspiration is transmuted into art—we will read and discuss in class a selection of short stories.  We will try to understand these works in terms of why the author has made the aesthetic choices he or she has made.  Why first person?  Why third person?  Why is X the narrator rather than Y?  Why the present tense?  Why dramatize this scene; why narrate this information? Genre fiction, such as sci fi, bodice-ripping romance, mystery, fantasy, young adult, will not be considered. Prerequisite: WR 224.
Text:  30/30: Thirty American Stories from the Last Thirty Year
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
Course Name: WR 327: Technical Writing
CRN: See Course Catalog
Instructor: Staff
Course Description: WR 327 will prepare you to produce instructive, informational, and persuasive documents aimed at well-defined and achievable outcomes. Technical documents are precise, concise, and organized, but often based on complex information. However, the purpose and target audience of each document often determines how that information is presented, including writing style, document layout, vocabulary, sentence and paragraph structure, and visuals, among other factors. To this end, this course teaches processes for analyzing writing contexts and producing effective, clean, and reader-centered documents in an efficient manner. Grounded in rhetorical theory, WR 327 presents contemporary research in technical communication and instructs students in current best practices. Individually and in groups, students learn effective strategies for communicating with technology in the modern, networked workplace.
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
Course Name: WR 330: Understanding Grammar
Section: 1
CRN: 52702
Instructor Name: Brock, Isabelle
Time: Hybrid course: R 1400-1520
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1300-1400
Office Location (in Moreland): 232
Course Description: WR 330 is an advanced study of traditional grammatical forms and conventional grammatical terms with emphasis on the assumptions underlying the structure of traditional grammar. As a 300-level course, this class will require significant student practice, discussion, and evaluation. In this course, we will study the sentence—its structure, and the possible ways to create one. We'll gain the vocabulary to discuss language; we'll read and demonstrate comprehension of relevant theory, concepts, and techniques for understanding grammatically correct communication; and we'll develop appreciation of language, form, and style.

This section of WR 330 is a hybrid course, and approximately 50% of the course will take place in a traditional face-to-face classroom and 50% will be delivered through Canvas. In our online learning community, you will access learning materials, complete and submit assignments, take quizzes, and interact with your classmates and with the instructor.
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
Course Name: WR 330: Understanding Grammar 
Section: 402
CRN: 70983
Instructor Name: Brock, Isabelle
Time: E-campus course 
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1300-1400
Office Location (in Moreland): 232
Course Description: WR 330 is an advanced study of traditional grammatical forms and conventional grammatical terms with emphasis on the assumptions underlying the structure of traditional grammar. As a 300-level course, this class will require significant student practice, discussion, and evaluation. In this course, we will study the sentence, its structure, and all the possible ways to create one. We'll gain the vocabulary to discuss language; we'll read and demonstrate comprehension of relevant theory, concepts, and techniques for understanding grammatically correct communication; and we'll develop appreciation of language, form, and style.

This section of WR 330 is fully online, and will be delivered through Canvas, our online learning platform. In our online learning community, you will access learning materials, complete and submit assignments, take quizzes, and interact with your classmates and with the instructor through the discussion board.
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
Course Name: WR 340: Creative Nonfiction
Section: 1
CRN: 59319
Instructor Name: St. Germain, Justin
Time: M W F 1500-1550
Instructor Office Hours: M W F 1400-1450
Office Location (in Moreland): 316
Course Description: This course will focus on reading and writing creative nonfiction. Students will read extensively and gain experience writing and revising their own work, as well as participating in discussion and workshops. We'll examine contemporary works of creative nonfiction from writers such as James Baldwin, Jo Ann Beard, and David Foster Wallace, in order to analyze their use of craft form, scene, characterization, sources, etc.—and to use them as examples. You will be expected to read up to 100 pages per week, to participate each day in discussion, and to write assignments or exercises every week, as well as to write multiple drafts of creative pieces. Please consider this workload before enrolling in the course.
Course Name: ENG 341: Poetry Writing
Section: 1
CRN: 52951
Instructor Name: Biespiel, David
Time: 1400-1520
Instructor Office Hours: TBA
Instructor Office Location (in Moreland): 238
Course Description: Writing poetry isn’t about making money or making friends, getting dates or getting famous. It’s about celebrating and following the journey of your mind and imagination through the art and framework of writing new, original poems. Becoming a poet is like wanting to be an artist or musician or athlete. It’s having faith in the idea that practice and discipline and studying those poetic frameworks gives you the opportunity to better understand your psyche and then to transfer that understanding to others who might be in need of your insight through your poems. It’s about reading more poems than you write and reading about poetry, too. It’s about a strong desire to participate in the community of poets of today and the past. And it’s about writing new poems and sharing them with a special group of peers and discussing how the language of your experiences can become the metaphors and language of your poems. WR 341 Intermediate Poetry Workshop is designed specifically for students who have taken WR 241 Beginning Poetry Workshop.
Course Name: WR 362: Science Writing
Section: 1
CRN: 56817
Instructor Name: Connor, Roby
Time: M W F 1300-1350
Instructor Office Hours: M W F 1200-1300
Instructor Office Location (in Moreland): 328
Course Description: Learn and practice the conventions for writing scientific information for a general audience, including print and digital publishing, in magazine and newspaper style, using effective images and graphics to explain challenging concepts. While working on good writing style to create engaging feature articles which explain science to a general educated audience, the course will also look at the field of writing science for various audiences. Case studies of professional science writers and analysis of publications will give you a strong foundation for researching and writing your own informative feature articles and book reviews.
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
Course Name: WR 362: Science Writing
Section: 400
CRN: TBA
Instructor Name: Jameson, Sara
Time: Ecampus
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Office Location (in Moreland): N/A
Course Description: Learn and practice the conventions for writing scientific information for a general audience, including print and digital publishing, in magazine and newspaper style, using effective images and graphics to explain challenging concepts. While working on good writing style to create engaging feature articles which explain science to a general educated audience, the course will also look at the field of writing science for various audiences. Case studies of professional science writers and analysis of publications will give you a strong foundation for researching and writing your own informative feature articles and book reviews. The course has a special focus on The New York Times.
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
Course Name: WR 414: Advertising and Public Relations Writing
Section: 400
CRN: 59911
Instructor Name: St. Jacques, Jillian
Time: Ecampus
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Instructor Office Location (in Moreland) 352
Course Description: Consider the use of rhetoric and persuasive writing in contemporary advertising, from high-end television commercials and slick fashion ads to blatant spam and pay per click pop-ups. Next, consider the use of similar rhetorical tactics in public relations campaigns, with their tactfully poised messages designed to remedy crisis situations or promote an institutionʼs assets. Although the two fields might seem worlds apart, advertising and public relations actually share a deeply intrinsic task: deploying rhetorical skills to persuade, convince and motivate target audiences to take a desired action. To achieve this aim, professionals in advertising and public relations must be adept at writing in any media form that conveys a message plausibly and expediently. Assignments: Students will synthesize their efforts in assembling and critiquing two multi-document portfolios – an advertising campaign and a press kit.
Course Name: WR 420: Style and the Sentence
Section: 1
CRN: 55758
Instructor Name: Jensen, Tim
Time: M W F 1500-1550
Instructor Office Hours: M W 1030-1200
Office Location (in Moreland): 204B
Course Description: This course will study the sentence on various levels and using multiple approaches. We'll approach sentences like architecture, examining the interaction between structural elements and overall design. We'll dissect and diagram sentences with a steady hand as if we were anatomists. We'll enhance our aesthetic and sensorial appreciation of sentences through rigorous study of the environmental factors that influence their character and quality, just as a sommelier studies viticulture to add complexity and depth to the appreciation of wine. Most importantly, perhaps, we'll study the craft of sentences by crafting them ourselves, developing skills through regular practice, varied exercises, and scaffolded projects.

Successful students will leave the course with an improved understanding of syntax and grammar; heightened awareness of the relationship between sentence structure and clarity of communication; an expanded critical vocabulary for discussing style; and stronger skills in craft.
Course Name: WR 424: Advanced Fiction Writing
Section: 1
CRN: 51210
Instructor Name: Dybek, Nick
Time: T R 1000-1120
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1120-1220
Office Location (in Moreland): 204A
Course Description: In this course, you will continue to build on the skills you developed in WR 224 and WR 324 by reading and discussing the work of both published authors and your peers with an eye toward construction and craft. Our particular focus will be on reading and writing our own linked short stories that is, groups of stories in which each works independently, while also forming a longer narrative with the others, organized around confluences of character, setting, voice, etc. You will read three linked collections of published fiction and produce your own mini-collection of at least three linked stories by the end of the term.  Prerequisites:  WR 224 and 324.
Course Name: WR 441: Advanced Poetry Writing
Section: 1
CRN: 53188
Instructor Name: Biespiel, David
Time: T R 1400-1520
Instructor Office Hours: TBA
Office Location (in Moreland): 238
Course Description: Writing poetry isn’t about making money or making friends, getting dates or getting famous. It’s about celebrating and following the journey of your mind and imagination through the art and framework of writing new, original poems. Becoming a poet is like wanting to be an artist or musician or athlete. It’s having faith in the idea that practice and discipline and studying those poetic frameworks gives you the opportunity to better understand your psyche and then to transfer that understanding to others who might be in need of your insight through your poems. It’s about reading more poems than you write and reading about poetry, too. It’s about a strong desire to participate in the community of poets of today and the past. And it’s about writing new poems and sharing them with a special group of peers and discussing how the language of your experiences can become the metaphors and language of your poems. WR 341 Intermediate Poetry Workshop is designed specifically for students who have taken WR 241 Beginning Poetry Workshop.
Course Name: WR 449: Critical Reviewing
Section: 1
CRN: TBA
Instructor Name: Strini, Thomas
Time: T 1730-1820
Instructor Office Hours: TBA
Office Location (in Moreland): 360
Course Description:

In Critical Reviewing, students write analytical critiques of music, art, film, theater, television, architecture, design, fashion, literature and related subjects, under the instruction of a professional critic with more than three decades of newspaper and online magazine experience. Students write one story per week and publish their stories in The Corvallis Review, an online magazine with a real-world readership. We discuss and evaluate the results in a writers' workshop setting. The goals include improved writing style and structure on the one hand and deepening understanding of the arts on the other. Students also learn to win an audience for their work in an online setting, through leveraging social media and through applying simple search engine optimization techniques. Overall readership growth wins bonus points for all students.