Catalog and Schedule:
English

Catalog and Schedule:
Film

Catalog and Schedule:
Writing

 

Course Descriptions
Winter 2018:
English

Course Descriptions
Winter 2018:
Film

Course Descriptions
Winter 2018:
Writing

Fall 2017

Winter 2018

Fall 2017

Winter 2018

Fall 2017

Winter 2018

 


ENG 100 Level
ENG 200 Level
ENG 300 Level
ENG 400 Level
 

FILM 100 Level
FILM 200 Level
FILM 400 Level

WR 100 Level
WR 200 Level
WR 300 Level
WR 400 Level

  Download the Winter Term 2018 Course Descriptions Booklet (Coming soon!)

 
Course Name: ENG 104: Introduction to Literature: Fiction

Section: 2

CRN: 33245

Instructor: Elbom, Gilad

Class Time: TR 1600-1720

Instructor Office Hours: TBA

Location (In Moreland): 232

Course Description: Through a close reading of influential works of fiction, this class will explore a variety of literary elements: setting, characters, plot, conflict, motives, emotions, language, style, themes, point of view, and other techniques, devices, and components. We will discuss the conventions of fiction, observe innovative modes of writing, and examine fiction in larger contexts: historical, comparative, structural, theological, modernist, postmodern, psychological, philosophical, feminist, postcolonial, and so on. We will begin with a selection of short stories and end with a famous novel: Mist by Miguel de Unamuno, a tragicomic romance that illuminates the mechanisms of fiction and raises interesting questions about reality and the imagination, God and humanity, author and authorship, and the interplay of writers, fictitious characters, and readers. We will also watch visual narratives that explore some of the basic elements of fiction.

BACC Core: Literature and the Arts


 

Course Name: ENG 104: Introduction to Literature: Fiction

Section: 1

CRN: 31269

Instructor: Scribner, K.

Class Time: MWF 13:00-13:50

Instructor Office Hours: MW 14:00-15:00

Location (In Moreland): 308

Course Description: In this course we'll read short stories and novels. As we proceed through the term, our focus will be on close reading and how these works achieve aesthetic and emotional affect through fictional craft, such as plot, character, setting, voice, and symbolism. Course outcomes will include developing skills in textual analysis, close reading, and critical thinking and writing. We'll examine these works for their historical, literary, social, and political significance, as well as their varying styles and themes, keeping in mind that they are first and foremost works of art. Mondays and Wednesdays will be lecture; Fridays will be discussion groups.

BACC Core: Literature and the Arts


 

Course Name: ENG 104: Introduction to Literature: Fiction

Section: 400

CRN: 33792

Instructor: Larison, John

Class Time: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: Ecampus

Location (In Moreland): 338

Course Description: Introduction to Fiction offers you a chance to read, ponder, and explore some of the most influential fiction of the last century. Specifically, we'll be focusing our explorations on issues of theme, context, and craft. During the first seven weeks, we'll be reading short stories. During the last three weeks of the course, each student will select one of the course novels (listed on the syllabus) to read and analyze. Expect an inspiring and intellectually rigorous course that prioritizes analysis and discussion.

BACC Core: Literature and the Arts


 

Course Name: ENG 104: Introduction to Literature: Fiction

Section: 401

CRN: 38141

Instructor: Larison, John

Class Time: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: Ecampus

Location (In Moreland): 338

Course Description: Introduction to Fiction offers you a chance to read, ponder, and explore some of the most influential fiction of the last century. Specifically, we'll be focusing our explorations on issues of theme, context, and craft. During the first seven weeks, we'll be reading short stories. During the last three weeks of the course, each student will select one of the course novels (listed on the syllabus) to read and analyze. Expect an inspiring and intellectually rigorous course that prioritizes analysis and discussion.

BACC Core: Literature and the Arts


 

Course Name: ENG 106: Introduction to Literature: Poetry

Section: 1

CRN: 30058

Instructor: Biespiel, David

Class Time: TR 0830-0950

Instructor Office Hours: TR 0730-0830am

Location (In Moreland): 228

Course Description: For centuries reading and discussion of poetry has been required learning for an educated person. Not only that, there are many people throughout the world who reads poems frequently, even daily. To read poems for ten weeks in EN 106 with a group of fellow students from across the university, students with diverse majors and life experiences, is to participate in the highest ideals of your liberal arts education. It is to pursue appreciation for the basic human experience of metaphor and to enjoy thinking imaginatively, critically, and creatively for its own sake. EN 106 is less about solving the meaning of poems and more about exploring the questions of life that poems enter (and looking at how poems do that, too). With focus on the experiences of poems, poets, and readers, with focus on the public and private lives that poems explore, with focus on the pleasures of the arrangement of language and metaphor, and with focus on the cultural, social, political, and spiritual subjects.

BACC Core: Literature and the Arts


 

Course Name: ENG 106: Introduction to Literature: Poetry

Section: 400

CRN: 34331

Instructor: Brock, Isabelle

Class Time: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: Ecampus

Location (In Moreland): 232

Course Description: What is poetry, and why does poetry matter? In this class, we will read, think about, write about, and discuss a wide variety of poems as we look at poetry through a critical lens. We'll examine poetic devices such as tone, sound, repetition, rhythm, imagery, and symbolism, and we'll investigate the ways poetry reflects and shapes culture.

This course is not a creative writing course, but we will be creative, and we will explore various elements of poetry by experimenting with techniques ourselves. Participation in class discussions and completion of exploratory assignments and guided reading responses make up a significant part of your grade. Quizzes and a final exam allow you to illuminate the understanding you've gained.
 

BACC Core: Literature and the Arts


 

Course Name: ENG 106: Introduction to Literature: Poetry

Section: 401

CRN: 39540

Instructor: Brock, Isabelle

Class Time: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: Ecampus

Location (In Moreland): 232

Course Description: What is poetry, and why does poetry matter? In this class, we will read, think about, write about, and discuss a wide variety of poems as we look at poetry through a critical lens. We’ll examine poetic devices such as tone, sound, repetition, rhythm, imagery, and symbolism, and we’ll investigate the ways poetry reflects and shapes culture.

This course is not a creative writing course, but we will be creative, and we will explore various elements of poetry by experimenting with techniques ourselves. Participation in class discussions and completion of exploratory assignments and guided reading responses make up a significant part of your grade. Quizzes and a final exam allow you to illuminate the understanding you’ve gained.
 


 

Course Name: ENG 106: Introduction to Literature: Poetry

Section: 3

CRN: 33758

Instructor: Holmberg, Karen

Class Time: MWF 900-950

Instructor Office Hours: MW 1000-1100

Location (In Moreland): 350

Course Description: This course provides an overview of the main modes, techniques, and characteristics of poetry through an examination of world poetry. Using anthology readings and the on-line resources, the course will cover world poetry by geographical region, and will feature 4 units focused on relevant topics or themes within world poetry: Poetics and Craft; Poetry as Cultural Performance; Poetry as Social Action and Historical Witness; Translation and Influence. During each unit, we will also study the poetic devices nearly universal to poetry, such as rhythm, sound play, image, symbol, metaphor, point of view, and tone, and examine connections between poetry, society, culture, and citizenship. This course requires collaboration, group work, and hands on poetry activities.

BACC Core: Literature and the Arts


 

Course Name: ENG 106: Introduction to Literature: Poetry

Section: 2

CRN: 32644

Instructor: Brock, Isabelle

Class Time: T 1600-1720

Instructor Office Hours: T 1500-1600

Location (In Moreland): 232

Course Description: What is poetry, and why does poetry matter? In this class, we will read, think about, write about, and discuss a wide variety of poems as we look at poetry through a critical lens. We'll examine poetic devices such as tone, sound, repetition, rhythm, imagery, and symbolism, and we'll investigate the ways poetry reflects and shapes culture.

This course is not a creative writing course, but we will be creative, and we will explore various elements of poetry by experimenting with techniques ourselves. Participation in class discussions and completion of exploratory assignments and guided reading responses make up a significant part of your grade. Quizzes and a final exam allow you to illuminate the understanding you've gained.
 

BACC Core: Literature and the Arts


 

Course Name: ENG 107: Introduction to Literature: Nonfiction

Section: 1

CRN: 35155

Instructor: Passarello, Elena

Class Time: TR 1000-1120

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1130-1230

Location (In Moreland): 342

Course Description: This course, which fulfills Oregon State's Literature and the Arts requirement, surveys literary nonfiction from the past millennium. Like fiction and poetry, nonfiction has enjoyed a long tradition as a form of creative expression. Students will study 1,000-year-old diaries from Japanese women of court, boxing journalism from 19th-century England, war dispatches, standup comedy, nature writing, radio documentaries, and memoirs in comics form. As we work through these texts, our discussions and short essays will chart the evolution of literary nonfiction as a genre that fuses art and literature with the (sometimes tricky to prove) truths of our world.

BACC Core: Literature and the Arts


 

Course Name: ENG 200: Library Skills for Literary Study

Section: 1

CRN: 31206

Instructor: McElroy, Kelly

Class Time: W 1000-1050, weeks 1-6

Instructor Office Hours: T 0100-0300

Location (In Moreland): Valley Library 2511

Course Description: In this course, we will look at the topic of "library skills" broadly. We will spend time learning how to find and use resources from the OSU Libraries' collections and will think about issues related to information. We will look at how information is organized; knowledge you can use to unlock any collection of information, in a library, on the web, or in an archive. We will also explore how to learn from and integrate primary sources (materials from Special Collections and Archives) into our research; we will examine the expertise, authority and credibility of those who create the information we use; we will learn about fair use and the rights we have to information we create and consume. We will also consider the social, political and economic aspects of information and knowledge production to better understand today's information society. Course projects will be online so we can practice publicly expressing our work.


 

Course Name: ENG 202: Jacobean Shakespeare

Section: 1

CRN: 39131

Instructor: Barbour, Richmond

Class Time: TR 1200-1320

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1115-1145, 1530-1600

Location (In Moreland): 322

Course Description: This course treats five plays from the "Jacobean" or latter half of Shakespeare's career. Because our principal aim is to sharpen everyone's skills as readers of Shakespeare's work, his texts will earn our primary attention. While attending to the language, we will consider a range of other concerns: staging, plot construction, genre, characterization, family dynamics, social relations, ethnicity, class, gender, cinematic adaptation, and Shakespeare's involvement in the political and popular cultures of his day and ours. Our sessions will combine lecture and discussion, readings and viewings. Shakespeare's language is challenging--and richly rewarding. To do well in this class, students must keep pace with an ambitious syllabus, engage the concerns of the text, and participate in discussion.

BACC Core: Western Culture,Literature and the Arts

Pre-1800: Pre-1800


 

Course Name: ENG 205: British Literature Survey Restoration to Romantic

Section: 1

CRN: 37399

Instructor: Holmberg, Karen

Class Time: MWF 1100-1150

Instructor Office Hours: MW 1000-1100

Location (In Moreland): 350

Course Description: This course presents a chronological survey of British Literature from the Restoration through the Romantic age. We will consider the cultural, historical, and intellectual contexts of the writers we study, as well as issues of influence and inheritance. By reading broadly in British poetry and prose, the student will gain an appreciation of the movements within the history of modern literature in English, will practice close reading and interpretive skills, and refine their understanding of literary forms and structure. Student will be evaluated based on weekly quizzes, two exams and a final essay.

BACC Core: Literature and the Arts


 

English 207: Literature of Western Civilization, Classical to Renaissance

Section: 1

CRN: 37400

Instructor: Anderson, Chris

Class Time: MWF 1000-10:50

Office Hours: MWF 1100-1150

Location (In Moreland): 324

Course Description: In this course we will read parts of five of the greatest books in the Western tradition:  Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, Virgil’s Aeneid, Augustine’s Confessions, and Dante’s Inferno.  Our translations will be brisk and contemporary, and our focus will be on two themes:  the theme of the “hero” and how we are all heroes, on our own journeys; and the theme of the afterlife, or the underworld, or hell, and how we all get into it or out of it or both.  The work for the course will be three multiple-choice exams, a journal and some writing revised from the journal, and weekly in-class quizzes and freewriting.  Fulfills BAC-Core in both Western Culture and Literature and the Arts.  Texts::  The Illiad, translated by Stephen Mitchell; The Odyssey and The Aeneid, translated by Robert Fagles; The Confessions, translated by Rex Warner; and The Inferno, translated John Ciardi.

BACC Core: Western Culture, Literarture and the Arts, Pre-1800

 

Course Name: ENG 213: Literatures of the World: Middle East

Section: 400

CRN: 39542

Instructor: Elbom, Gilad

Class Time: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: TBA

Location (In Moreland): 232

Course Description: This class will focus on modern Middle Eastern literature from multiple perspectives: cultural, political, religious, historical, geographical, linguistic, and other points of view. The texts on our reading list include feminist novels from Egypt and Lebanon, innovative Hebrew poetry from Israel, and a surrealistic, hallucinatory, self-deceptive novel from Iran. We will pay special attention to different national, religious, cultural, and linguistic categories in the Middle East, in particular the intersections between Jewish, Muslim, and Christian narratives. We will also try to establish connections between Middle Eastern literature and global intellectual ideas.

BACC Core: Cultural Diversity, Literature and the Arts


 

Course Name: ENG 221: African American Literature

Section: 1

CRN: 39684

Instructor: Osagie, Iyun

Class Time: TR 1400-1520

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1530-1645

Location (In Moreland): 236

Course Description: Slavery and African American Literature
This course examines African American petitions, poems, slave narratives, drama, autobiographies, and novels as literary reconstructions of the economics, politics, ethics, and poetics of slavery. Stylistically and structurally, we will focus on the use of oratory (including the black vernacular), myths, legends, tales, etc. in selected texts so as to understand the complex relationship between slavery and the literary imagination of African American as subjects (artists) and objects (of art). What limitations and possibilities did African Americans confront as they read, wrote, and talked their way into freedom, literacy, and American citizenry? What challenges do they face some 150 years later in the production of neo-slave narratives in a postmodern era?

BACC Core: Literature and the Arts


 

Course Name: ENG 253: Survey of American Literature: Colonial to 1900

Section: 1

CRN: 39132

Instructor: Sheehan, Elizabeth

Class Time: MWF 1100-1150

Instructor Office Hours: MWF 1200-1250

Location (In Moreland): 234

Course Description: In this course, we will study key forms, themes, and contexts for literature written in and about "America" before 1900. The class will move chronologically across a range of genres and style and readings including narratives of exploration, conquest, enslavement, and freedom; poems about devotion, domesticity, and discovery; and short stories about disaffected workers and stubborn, adventurous women. Among the authors whose work we will read are Cabeza de Vaca, Phillis Wheatley, Anne Bradstreet, Benjamin Franklin, Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, W.E.B. Du Bois, Harriet Jacobs, and Henry James.

BACC Core: Western Culture, Literature and the Arts


 

Course Name: ENG 254: Survey of American Literature: 1900 to Present

Section: 1

CRN: 37402

Instructor: Malewitz, Raymond

Class Time: MWF 1300-1350

Instructor Office Hours: MWF 1400-1450

Location (In Moreland): 340

Course Description: This course offers a rapid introduction to the key figures and movements of American literature from 1900 to the present. The key questions that we will ask concern the ways that we might categorize the large and heterogeneous output of American literary artists during this period.

Course Learning Outcomes
1.) We will examine the ways that American Modernist poets and novelists position themselves within regional, national, and international cultures.
2.) We will examine the strategies by which post-World War II American artists depart from the forms, themes, and styles of their literary ancestors.
3.) We will explore relationship between literature and cultural studies through discussions of race, class, gender, and sexuality.
4.) Finally, we will examine emergent genres that may shape the future directions of American literature.

BACC Core: Western Culture,Literature and the Arts


 

Course Name: ENG 254H: Survey of American Literature: 1900 to Present

Section: 1

CRN: 38911

Instructor: Helle, Anita

Class Time: TR 1000-1120

Instructor Office Hours: MW 1400-1530 & by appointment

Location (In Moreland): 224

Course Description: This University Honors College section offers an introduction to the key figures and movements of American literature from 1900 to the present. The key questions that we will ask concern the ways that we might categorize the large and heterogeneous output of American literature artists during this period. We will begin by asking what makes American literature "Modernist" and will conclude with the ways that contemporary writers continue to adapt and depart from these traditions. Our focus will be on literary texts, but there will be opportunities to study the relationships between literature and visual, oral, and cinematic texts.
 

BACC Core: Western Culture,Literature and the Arts


 

Course Name: ENG 311: Studies in British Prose

Section: 1

CRN: 39133

Instructor: Ward, Megan

Class Time: TR 1000 - 1120

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1130 - 1230

Location (In Moreland): 302

Course Description: This course will focus on reading just one novel: George Eliot's Middlemarch. Virginia Woolf famously said that Middlemarch is "one of the few English novels written for grown-up people," and we will immerse ourselves in the novel and its contexts. Often called the best nineteenth-century novel and a classic example of British realism, Middlemarch offers the opportunity to learn about novelistic form and its historical contexts, including science, nature, religion, and politics. Because this is a WIC course, we'll use our reading of Middlemarch as an opportunity to learn more about writing for the English major, including creating an annotated edition of Middlemarch, journaling, and writing essays.


 

Course Name: ENG 318: The American Novel: Modernist Period

Section: 400

CRN: 34332

Instructor: Elbom, Gilad

Class Time: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: TBA

Location (In Moreland): 232

Course Description: Focusing on some of the prominent thematic, stylistic, historical, and cultural aspects of American modernism, this class will combine famous classics with important novels other than the ones commonly perceived as canonical. Through close textual analysis and active participation in ongoing class discussions, we will examine seminal works of American modernism that have paved the way for previously silenced voices, paying attention to the rise of nontraditional authors, characters, literary strategies, and subject matters. Our texts: (1) Willa Cather: My Ántonia (1918); (2) George Schuyler: Black No More (1931); 3. Djuna Barnes: Nightwood (1936); (4) Gertrude Stein: The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas (1933); (5) Ernest Hemingway: The Sun Also Rises (1926).

BACC Core: Western Culture,Literature and the Arts


 

Course Name: ENG 320: Page, Stage, and Screen

Section: 1

CRN: 39134

Instructor: Davison, Neil

Class Time: MWF 0900-0950

Instructor Office Hours: MW 1500-1700 F 1500-1600 & by appointment

Location (In Moreland): 230

Course Description: English 320: Page, Stage, and Screen: Hollywood in Novels and Films

This studies course focuses on various themes, genres, or authors from term to term through relations of text and performance; topics may include content from film, novels, drama, and other visual media. In "Hollywood in Novels and Films" we examine how novelists and directors have made the the American film industry itself the center of their narratives, and in doing so, become self-reflexive as to how fictions or imaginaries of our culture are reconstructed or analyzed in the two genres. We will also confront how adaptation may alter the thematic thrust of a single work as it moves from novel to film. Finally, we will attempt to discover aspects of the 20th-century "American Dream"as it becomes essential to Hollywood's message to the masses. By way of this, we'll study novels written during the "Golden Age" of Hollywood (1930-50's), and film from the 1970's-80's representing critiques of the film industry.

BACC Core: Literature and the Arts

Special Topic: "Hollywood in Novels and Film"


 

Course Name: ENG 321: Studies in Word, Object, and Image

Section: 1

CRN: 39135

Instructor: Sheehan, Elizabeth

Class Time: MWF 1500-1550

Instructor Office Hours: MWF 1200-1250

Location (In Moreland): 234

Course Description: What is fashion? How have writers described its forms and its power? What can the "fashion system" help us to understand about the creation and consumption of fiction? Those questions are central to this class, which examines the relationship between fashion and fiction with a focus on two key moments in costume and literary history: the early twentieth and the early twenty-first centuries. Reading for the class includes novels and short stories by North American and British writers--including Edith Wharton, Nella Larsen, Virginia Woolf, and William Gibson--as well as essays and cultural theory that examines fashion and fiction in a global context.

BACC Core: Literature and the Arts

Special Topic: Fashion and Fiction


 

Course Name: ENG 322: Studies in Globalism, Text, and Event

Section: 1

CRN: 39683

Instructor: Osagie, Iyun

Class Time: TR 1200-1320

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1530-1645

Location (In Moreland): 236

Course Description: Modernity, Race, Global Formations
Undoubtedly, the intersection between modernity and the politics of race account for the global formations in our world today. Globalization is sometimes touted and invited as a progressive platform for economic and social development because it tends to foreground a politics of inclusion; however, globalization raises anxieties about representation, imperialism, institutional power, and cultural domination. Issues of national belonging, race, individuality, and even the environment undergo significant erosion under the banner of globalization. Such cultural encounters in our modern world change how we perceive ourselves and how we produce meaning. This course introduces students to essays and theoretical arguments about the impact of modernity on race and the resulting global formations. We will discuss and reflect on a number of texts from scholars around the world that address different sites of struggle in the global production of meaning.

BACC Core: Literature and the Arts,Contemporary Global Issues


 

Course Name: ENG 362: American Women Writers

Section: 1

CRN: 38217

Instructor: Helle, Anita

Class Time: TR 1400-1520

Instructor Office Hours: MW 1400-1530 & by appointment

Location (In Moreland): 224

Course Description: American Women Writers studies important literary works in a variety of genres by American women writers from historical, thematic, and formalist perspectives. This section is designed to acquaint students with major developments in the study of gender and authorship by American women writers from the late nineteenth century to the present. This course differs from many courses in literary studies by focusing explicitly on themes, plots, and images of women most closely linked to new freedoms, constraints, and changing definitions / performances of gender that have marked new developments in women's writing in the twentieth and twenty-first century.

BACC Core: Literature and the Arts


 

Course Name: ENG 374: The Modern Short Story

Section: 1

CRN: 39136

Instructor: Sandor, Marjorie

Class Time: MWF 1500-1550

Instructor Office Hours: MWF 1600-1650

Location (In Moreland): 314

Course Description: In this survey of the short story, we will look closely at several masterful stories, long and short, from the early 19th century up through the 21st. We'll explore the origins of the form in folktales and stories of the fantastic, observe the beginnings of the realist tradition, the dazzling experiments of the 20th century modernists, and make our way to the contemporary moment, with its rich international diversity of approaches and subjects. Along the way, students will learn the art of close-reading, and study the elements of the fiction writer's craft, from imagery and setting to point of view, voice and story structure. Written work required: several 2 page close-reading exercises, a midterm, a final, and a final essay.

BACC Core: Literature and the Arts


 

Course Name: ENG 375: Children's Literature

Section: 400

CRN: 37897

Instructor: Braun, Clare

Class Time: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1000-1100

Location (In Moreland): 136

Course Description: This course surveys a variety of genres, which may include fairy tales, folktales, fables, nonsense poetry, picture books, historical and fantasy novels, examining how these texts represent childhood and connect with historical, cultural, and psychological contexts.

What counts as children's literature? Is its purpose to entertain, to socialize, to indoctrinate, or something else? In this class, we will tackle these questions (and more) as we examine the development of children's literature over time, beginning with the first "golden age" of the nineteenth century and ending with our current "golden age" in the twenty-first century. We will think about how conceptions of childhood have changed over time, shaped by and shaping the literature produced for children. Additionally, we will look at children's literature from the perspective of craft, investigating how literary devices and styles are used by children's authors to influence the child reader in a myriad of ways.


 

Course Name: ENG 406: Projects: Editing Shakespeare

Section: 2

CRN: 39139

Instructor: Olson, Rebecca

Class Time: TR 1000-1050

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1100-1200

Location (In Moreland): 244

Course Description: [No description needed; enrollment by instructor approval only]
 


 

Course Name: ENG 445: Studies in Nonfiction: Montaigne and the History of the Essay

Section: 1

CRN: 39158

Instructor: Anderson, Chris

Class Time: MWF 0900-0950

Instructor Office Hours: MWF 1100-1150

Location (In Moreland): 324

Course Description: In this course we'll study Montaigne in historical context, looking for what he can teach us as creative writers, or scholars, or both.. But we're also going to explore what he might be able to teach us as actual people, in the world, now. We'll read an essay of his each period, with some background reading, as well as essays by contemporary writers . We'll be interested in what Montaigne meant by the word "essay", both in the sense of the moves he makes as a writer and in the sense of the world he sees and the ways he invites us to see it. Montaigne invented the essay form, and though the essay has changed over the centuries, to understand contemporary nonfiction we need to understand where it started. The work will be a journal in which I'll ask you to write essayistically about Montaigne's essays, as well as weekly check-Ins in which you answer questions about the reading and do a brief freewrite. Texts: Montaigne's Essays, ed. Donald Frame; How to Live, Sarah Bakewell.

Pre-1800: Pre-1800

Special Topic: Montaigne and the History of the Essay


 

Course Name: ENG 454: Major Authors: Ben Jonson

Section: 1

CRN: 39182

Instructor: Barbour, Richmond

Class Time: TR 1400-1520

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1115-1145, 1530-1600

Location (In Moreland): 322

Course Description: The man who praised the late William Shakespeare as "not of an age, but for all time" was the most respected poet and playwright alive in England at the time. Yet no one has suffered more than Ben Jonson for not being William Shakespeare. Eclipsed by the star-power of "the Bard", Jonson wins far less attention in theaters and literature departments today than he deserves. To give the man and his work some serious respect, we will read and interrogate a generous sampling of his poetry, prose, and plays. A brick-layer's step son, an upwardly mobile, ambitious writer conscious of his merit and acutely sensitive to rejection, Jonson contributed decisively to the development of authorial rights in England. His career and works are fascinating, high-energy performances that distinguish him vividly from Shakespeare and illuminate the social and material realities of Renaissance London in brilliant, variously idealized and scathing, and often hilarious ways.

Pre-1800: Pre-1800

Special Topic: Ben Jonson


 

Course Name: ENG 490: History of the English Language

Section: 1

CRN: 39187

Instructor: Bude, Tekla

Class Time: MWF 1200-1250

Instructor Office Hours: W 1300-1500

Location (In Moreland): 222

Course Description: Between June and September of 2017, 1000 new entries were added to the Oxford English Dictionary's catalog of nearly 230,000 English words. Among them were "funked up" ,"bracketologist", and "fatberg“ proof that English is constantly changing to address the concerns and interests of the present. In this class, we will study the history of the English language over the last 1500 years, examining its syntax, grammar, and vocabulary in its social, political, and artistic context. How do war, trade, globalization, memes, and tourism affect language? How is it that we consider the creole of Papua New Guinea (Mi lukim dok), Old English (Ic seo thone hund), Middle English (Y se the dogge), and Modern Standard English (I see the dog) as belonging to the same language despite broad differences? Although we will focus on the whole history of English, this class will pay particularly close attention to Old English, Middle English, and contemporary Englishes from around the world.

Pre-1800: Pre-1800

 

Course Name: FILM 110: Introduction to Film Studies: 1895-1945

Section: 1

CRN: 39191

Instructor: Lewis, Jon

Class Time: M 1800-2150 / TR 1400-1520

Instructor Office Hours: T 1200-1400

Location (In Moreland): 312

Course Description: This course will introduce students to an international history of film from its very beginnings in the 1890s through the onset of World War II. Of particular interest and import will be the era's key film movements (formalism, expressionism, etc.) and the evolution of American studio film production (with a focus on various important film genres and auteurs). Throughout, the course presents a Hollywood/industrial, as well as global cultural (political, economic and social) history. Weekly films screenings to include: Potemkin, Nosferatu, Scarface, Stagecoach, It Happened One Night, Rules of the Game, and Citizen Kane.

BACC Core: Western Culture, Literature and the Arts

 

Course Name: FILM 125: Introduction to Film Studies

Section: 1

CRN: 37409

Instructor: Zuo, Mila

Class Time: TR 1600-1720/R 1800-2150

Instructor Office Hours: T 1130-1330

Location (In Moreland): 200

Course Description: The 1960s, referred to as the " Long Decade" because of its lasting impacts, was an exciting time for cinema. Post-war atmospheres, revolutionary politics, and new technologies kindled experimentation with film form, genre, and style. Surveying national cinemas of the 60s throughout the Americas, Europe, and Asia, this course explores the development of modern cinemas by focusing on the period's most influential and remarkable filmmakers and film movements. New cinemas of this era were often in dialogue with one another, and we examine film as a global phenomenon that developed within diverse historical and industrial contexts. Capaciously approaching "revolution" through politics, as well as aesthetics and forms, we study film's social praxis and the possibilities of innovative disruption. In this introductory course, students will be equipped with foundational tools with which to critically engage with cinema as artistic form, political object, and commercial artifact.
 

BACC Core: Western Culture,Literature and the Arts

Special Topic: Revolutionary Cinemas of the 1960s


 

Course Name: FILM 245: New American Cinema

Section: 400

CRN: 36896

Instructor: Rust, Stephen

Class Time: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: MWF 1300-1400

Location (In Moreland): NA

Course Description: This course will attend to the development of the economic, aesthetic, and cultural aspects of the modern U.S. motion picture industry (1968-present). Important films and filmmakers, along with key events in the business of developing, producing, distributing, and exhibiting motion pictures will be analyzed. Based upon the on-campus version of the course taught by Distinguished Professor of Film Jon Lewis, this eCampus course features interview-style video lectures by Dr. Lewis, supplementary audio-visual material, and weekly reading and film screening assignments. While there are no prerequisites for the course and students from all majors and minors are welcome, it is important to note that this is an ambitious 200-level academic course, not a film appreciate class.

BACC Core: Literature and the Arts


 

Course Name: FILM 255: World Cinema Part I: Origins to 1968

Section: 1

CRN: 39194

Instructor: Zuo, Mila

Class Time: TR 1000-1120/T 1800-2150

Instructor Office Hours: T 1130-1330

Location (In Moreland): 200

Course Description: This course surveys the global evolution of motion pictures from the 1890s to the beginning of cinema's modern era. It provides cultural, historical, industrial/technological, and theoretical frameworks with which to comprehend the development of filmic traditions around the world, including German Expressionism, Russian Formalism, classical Hollywood cinema, Italian Neorealism, classical Asian cinemas (Indian, Chinese, Japanese), and New Wave cinemas. Although the course focuses on narrative cinema, other filmmaking modes including documentary and avant-garde will also be examined. A historical appreciation of world cinemas will be supplemented with discussions on film language and various approaches to film analysis, including formalism, psychoanalytic theory, cultural studies, and star studies.

BACC Core: Literature and the Arts


 

Course Name: FILM 265: Films for the Future

Section: 1

CRN: 38119

Instructor: Nagypal, Tamas

Class Time: MWF 1400-1450 / W 1800-2150

Instructor Office Hours: M 1500-1700

Location (In Moreland): Autzen House 203

Course Description: The course examines the contemporary post-cinematic condition in which cinema has expanded beyond the limits of the film medium and the classical Hollywood narrative to offer a more holistic, immersive, and interactive experience for its audiences. It explores how the technological innovations of the medium are attached to particular philosophical and ideological visions of the future, such as the transformation and extension of the humanity sensorium through what André Bazin called the myth of total cinema. Topics include: the digital image, virtual reality, 3D, media convergence culture, videogames, trans-media narratives, DIY films, surveillance cinema.

BACC Core: Literature and the Arts


 

Course Name: FILM 452: Studies in Film: Alfred Hitchcock

Section: 1

CRN: 39680

Instructor: Lewis, Jon

Class Time: W 1800-2150 / R 1600-1950

Instructor Office Hours: T 1200-1400

Location: Darkside Cinema and Owen 103

Course Description: This course tracks the film career of one of the medium's foremost creative talents, Alfred Hitchcock, from his early years as a director in England through his many successes in Hollywood between 1940 and 1964. Of interest will be his evolution as an auteur, as a "film author" with a distinctive visual (anti-montage) style and a fondness for certain themes and story-lines: his predilection for playful psychodrama, for example. Weekly screenings will include his silent era masterpiece, The Lodger and Britain's first synch sound film, Blackmail as well as his better known Hollywood films: Rear Window, Psycho, Vertigo, and The Birds.

 

 

Course Name: WR 121: Writing Composition

Section: See Course Catalog

Course  Description: WR 121 is designed to help students develop skills and confidence in analytical writing. It also emphasizes rhetorical awareness—the perception of where, how, and why persuasion is occurring. This section offers the unique opportunity for collaboration with the Valley Library’s Special Collections and Archives Research Center. Students will engage directly with materials from the University’s collections in the process of writing a high-quality, researched academic essay. Assignments and in-class activities will emphasize and explore the process of writing, including acts of reading, researching, analytical thinking, freewriting, drafting, review, revision, and editing.

BACC Core: Writing l


 

Course Name: WR 201: Writing for Media

Section: 2

CRN: 31400

Instructor: St Jacques, Jillian

Class Time: MWF 1100-1150

Instructor Office Hours: F 1000-1050

Location (In Moreland): 352

Course Description: A veritable explosion in media culture took place after the popularization of the internet in the 1990s. Yes, we still have traditional media outlets -- but the advent of interactive media in the news has given rise to new forms of journalism; instantaneously breaking citizen reporting, blogs and podcasts, Twitter feeds and YouTube webcasts. While these media forms engage different visual and linguistic styles of representation and (sometimes) conform to different rules, the core skill set in writing for media remains the same: an ability to generate tight, accurate, insightful stories about real-time events at a moment's notice. Participants in WR201 begin this course by learning to formulate headlines, deks and summary leads using the inverted pyramid style. Having gained command of this basic writer's toolbox, participants progress to pitching and generating their own feature stories and profiles.

BACC Core: Writing ll


 

Course Name: WR 201: Writing for Media

Section: 4

CRN: 32788

Instructor: St Jacques, Jillian

Class Time: MWF 1300-1350

Instructor Office Hours: F 1000-1050

Location (In Moreland): 352

Course Description: A veritable explosion in media culture took place after the popularization of the internet in the 1990s. Yes, we still have traditional media outlets -- but the advent of interactive media in the news has given rise to new forms of journalism; instantaneously breaking citizen reporting, blogs and podcasts, Twitter feeds and YouTube webcasts. While these media forms engage different visual and linguistic styles of representation and (sometimes) conform to different rules, the core skill set in writing for media remains the same: an ability to generate tight, accurate, insightful stories about real-time events at a moment's notice. Participants in WR201 begin this course by learning to formulate headlines, deks and summary leads using the inverted pyramid style. Having gained command of this basic writer's toolbox, participants progress to pitching and generating their own feature stories and profiles.

BACC Core: Writing ll


 

Course Name: WR 201: Writing for Media

Section: 400

CRN: TBD

Instructor: St Jacques, Jillian

Class Time: MWF 1300-1350

Instructor Office Hours: F 1000-1050

Location (In Moreland): 352

Course Description: A veritable explosion in media culture took place after the popularization of the internet in the 1990s. Yes, we still have traditional media outlets -- but the advent of interactive media in the news has given rise to new forms of journalism; instantaneously breaking citizen reporting, blogs and podcasts, Twitter feeds and YouTube webcasts. While these media forms engage different visual and linguistic styles of representation and (sometimes) conform to different rules, the core skill set in writing for media remains the same: an ability to generate tight, accurate, insightful stories about real-time events at a moment's notice. Participants in WR201 begin this course by learning to formulate headlines, deks and summary leads using the inverted pyramid style. Having gained command of this basic writer's toolbox, participants progress to pitching and generating their own feature stories and profiles.

BACC Core: Writing ll


 

Course Name: WR 201: Writing for Media

Section: 3

CRN: 36659

Instructor: Strini, Thomas

Class Time: MWF 0900-0950

Instructor Office Hours: MWF 1000-1130

Location (In Moreland): 360

Course Description: Tom Strini's sections of WR201 Introduction emphasize internet publication and development of job skills related not only to journalism but also to public relations, content marketing and corporate communications. Students will learn to write clear, efficient, accurate prose on short deadlines. They will fill both writing and editing roles and learn to apply Associated Press style rules to their work. They will learn and practice the basics of journalism, including reporting, interviewing and editing. They will learn about the ethics of journalism and libel issues. And they will study and practice web publishing and the Search Engine Optimization techniques that bring readers to stories published on the web.

BACC Core: Writing ll

 

 

Course Name: WR 214: Business Writing

Section: See Course Catalog

Course Description: Thoughtful and thorough communication across multiple audiences and for multiple purposes continues to be an extremely important skill set in business. Writing in Business helps you build these skills and makes use of different networked technologies, software, and online materials in order to broaden your understanding of where, why, and how writing in the workplace happens. You’ll learn the principles and practices necessary for writing ethical and effective business letters, memos, and reports for a range of professional contexts. WR 214 will also help you present yourself as a professional, research job opportunities, write materials for job applications, and then land the position you want. The work you’ll do in this course is informed by current research in rhetoric and professional writing and is guided by the needs and practices of business, industry, and society at large.

BACC Core: Writing lI


 

Course Name: WR 224: Introdcution to Fiction Writing

Section: 400

CRN: 32904

Instructor: Harrison, Wayne

Class Time: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: Ecampus

Location (In Moreland): NA

Course Description: This online fiction writing workshop examines the basic techniques of fiction, with related writing exercises involving elements such as point of view, theme, characterization, and dialogue. Students will study the work of professional fiction writers and apply the principles of contemporary fiction to their own creative writing, creating and revising a satisfying short story. Assessment methods include creative writing exercises, quizzes and reading checks on textbook craft sections, peer review, and the evolution of a short story from rough draft to a 10 page final draft that meets the structural and thematic qualifications of literature.

BACC Core: Writing ll


 

Course Name: WR 224: Introduction to Fiction Writing

Section: 401

CRN: 38147

Instructor: Braun, Clare

Class Time: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1000-1100

Location (In Moreland): 136

Course Description: It's impossible to complete a study of writing literary short fiction in a ten week term. Our goal, then, will be to make a good beginning of this study both individually and as a writerly community, a beginning that you can continue to build on when this course is over. Over the next ten weeks, we will read and analyze short stories by contemporary authors that exemplify elements of writing craft such as character, point of view, conflict, and small detail. You will practice these craft elements in your own writing, some of which you will share with your peers to further our discussion and understanding of craft. As a community, we will work toward becoming better readers, critics, and writers of literary short fiction.

BACC Core: Writing ll


 

Course Name: WR 240: Intro to Non Fiction Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 35393

Instructor: GTA

Class Time: MWF 1000-1050

Instructor Office Hours: TBA

Location (In Moreland): NA

Course Description: This introductory creative writing course offers an overview of Creative Nonfiction, a genre that includes personal essay, memoir, lyric essay, literary journalism, radio essays, and more. Through a series of short readings and weekly prompts, students will gain experience with many of these forms, learning how to use scene and commentary to best present the stories of their own lives and the lives of others. Because of its emphasis on personal narratives, this Writing II-credit-elligible course is perfect for students looking for a course that fuses creativity and exciting readings with the practical writing skills needed to bring effective storytelling to their statements of purpose, cover letters, and other personally-focused application materials. Students should come to this course prepared to read, discuss, and experiment!


 
Course Name: WR 241: Introduction to Poetry Writing

Section: 4

CRN: 34882

Instructor: Biespiel, David

Class Time: TR 1200-1320

Instructor Office Hours: TR 0730-0830am

Location (In Moreland): 228

Course Description: A seminar practice for students who are beginning to write poetry or who have no prior workshop experience at Oregon State University. Emphasis is on generating new writing. The philosophy of this course is anti-critique, anti-nit-picking feedback. Nothing gets in the way of new writers more than old professors correcting a poem before the poet even knows what they are doing. Not that the old professor can't offer advice, experience, tips, know-how, and ideas. But the idea here is to write, rip it out of your notebook, and then write again. Then again, and again, and again. The goal is to help you catch the bug, get the bit in your teeth. If you do that right now, if you try that out right now, you may or may not become a writer, but you will be thinking and feeling and being alert to the world like a poet. For a little while at least. And that is how literature helps repair the wounds the world.

BACC Core: Literature and the Arts


 

Course Name: WR 241: Introduction to Poetry Writing

Section: 400

CRN: 32986

Instructor: Roush, Stephanie

Class Time: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: MWF 0900-1000

Location (In Moreland): 358

Course Description: "A poet is, before anything else, a person who is passionately in love with language" - W.H. Auden. In this course, we will explore the poetic craft and immerse ourselves in language as both readers and writers. This course will provide a firm grounding in the rudiments of poetic craft such as word choice, line breaks, imagery, and sound, as well as an introduction to different forms available to poets. We will consistently work through writing exercises and read the work of various poets in order to aid us in the generation of our own poems. I hope that you will become genuinely attached to the works/words of a few, if not all, of the poets we engage.

BACC Core: Writing ll


 

Course Name: WR 303: Writing for the Web

Section: 1

CRN: 38125

Instructor: Kelly, Kristy

Class Time: MWF 1000-1050

Instructor Office Hours: MW 1100-1300

Location (In Moreland): 208

Course Description: Writing for the Web prepares students to produce instructive, informative, and rhetorically savvy writing for Web-based locations and applications. Web-based writing is often written differently than writing meant for different media, because writing on the Web is more often concerned with helping people find information, get things done, convey their opinions, build communities, and collaborate on complex projects. To this end, Writing for the Web will teach students processes, strategies, and principles for analyzing writing contexts and producing writing for different content management systems, websites, webwares, and apps. This course also responds to the need for clear, effective, and detail-oriented writing in existing genres and for analysis and production in new and developing platforms. Instruction is grounded in rhetorical theory and by current research in digital rhetoric and technical writing as well as current multimedia writing practices.

BACC Core: Writing ll


 

Course Name: WR 323: English Composition

Section: 400

CRN: 32887

Instructor: Peters, Patrick

Class Time: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: T 0900 - 1200

Location (In Moreland): NA

Course Description: Writing and the reading of writing are social processes that encourage the reader to interpret and respond to texts in varied, unique, and often complex ways. Students in WR 323 will be asked to read and respond to the work of others and compose their own texts with a heightened awareness of style, or the way in which language is used to clearly and gracefully articulate one's own worldview. Students will be challenged to conceive of and develop their own style, focusing on elements of diction, tone, emphasis, shape and clarity. Coursework involves discussions, reading responses, on-going exercises such as style projects, author case studies, and two formal articles, one short and one feature length.

BACC Core: Writing ll


 

Course Name: WR 324: Short Story Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 30122

Instructor: Griffin, Kristin

Class Time: TR 1400-1520

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1130-1230

Location (In Moreland): 354

Course Description: This course is a workshop for writers with experience in writing fiction. Students learn techniques of the form by discussing their work, as well as the assigned readings, in a group setting. We'll be reading work by current writers, some of whom will Skype in with advice, and learning the features of today's literary landscape. The course assumes familiarity with major fiction writers and fundamental craft concepts, such as point of view, characterization, dialogue, and theme. Special attention will be paid to working on scenes "evoking emotion through dramatization, rather than through exposition" and to developing strategies for revision.

BACC Core: Writing ll


 

Course Name: WR 324: Short Story Writing

Section: 400

CRN: 32888

Instructor: Harrison, Wayne

Class Time: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: Ecampus

Location (In Moreland): NA

Course Description: In this Ecampus fiction writing workshop, students motivated to advance their creative writing skills will build upon a working knowledge of the elements of a fiction writer's craft, including point of view, dialogue, imagery and setting, character development, voice, and dramatic structure developed in WR 224. Students will study the work of major contemporary authors to advance their own writing. Exercises allow students to develop the beginning, middle, and end of stories, to work with imagery, and to listen for their own voice and style. In addition to these exercises, students write two complete short stories and revise one.

BACC Core: Writing ll

 

Course Name: WR 327: Technical Writing

Section: See Course Catalog

Course Description: WR 327 will prepare you to produce instructive, informational, and persuasive documents aimed at well-defined and achievable outcomes. Technical documents are precise, concise, and organized, but often based on complex information. However, the purpose and target audience of each document often determines how that information is presented, including writing style, document layout, vocabulary, sentence and paragraph structure, and visuals, among other factors. To this end, this course teaches processes for analyzing writing contexts and producing effective, clean, and reader-centered documents in an efficient manner. Grounded in rhetorical theory, WR 327 presents contemporary research in technical communication and instructs students in current best practices. Individually and in groups, students learn effective strategies for communicating with technology in the modern, networked workplace.

BACC Core: Writing ll

 

Course Name: WR 327: Technical Writing (Engineering)

Section: See Course Catalog

Course Description: In the "Technical Writing for Engineers" sections of WR 327, students use an engineering communication textbook and engage with the course objectives and learning outcomes through engineering-specific activities and assignments. This approach serves two purposes. First, by focusing specifically on principles of effective engineering communication, the course builds proficiency in the kinds of communication practices you will be tasked with both in pro-school and in the engineering workplace. Second, your engagement with fundamental engineering concepts in each of the course assignments will both solidify and extend your repertoire of technical knowledge. In other words, participation in this course not only will help you become a better engineering communicator but will also lead to greater conceptual and technical fluency in your chosen field.

BACC Core: Writing ll

Special Topic: Engineering


 

Course Name: WR 327: Technical Writing

Section: 10

CRN: 32089

Instructor: Elbom, Emily

Class Time: MWF 1400-1450

Instructor Office Hours: TBA

Location (In Moreland): 358

Course Description: In the "Technical Writing for Engineers" sections of WR 327, students use an engineering communication textbook and engage with the course objectives and learning outcomes through engineering-specific activities and assignments. This approach serves two purposes. First, by focusing specifically on principles of effective engineering communication, the course builds proficiency in the kinds of communication practices you will be tasked with both in pro-school and in the engineering workplace. Second, your engagement with fundamental engineering concepts in each of the course assignments will both solidify and extend your repertoire of technical knowledge. In other words, participation in this course not only will help you become a better engineering communicator but will also lead to greater conceptual and technical fluency in your chosen field.

BACC Core: Writing ll

Special Topic: Engineering

 
Course Name: WR 330: Understanding Grammar

Section: 400
CRN: 39708
Instructor: Brock, Isabelle
Class Time: Ecampus
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1300-1400
Location (In Moreland): 232

WR 330 is an advanced study of traditional grammatical forms and conventional grammatical terms with emphasis on the assumptions underlying the structure of traditional grammar. As a 300-level course, this class will require significant student practice, discussion, and evaluation. In this course, we will study the sentence—its structure, and all the possible ways to create one. We’ll gain the vocabulary to discuss language; we’ll read and demonstrate comprehension of relevant theory, concepts, and techniques for understanding grammatically correct communication; and we’ll develop appreciation of language, form, and style.

You will learn through reading assignments, homework completion, class discussions, various guided activities, discourse analysis projects, and weekly quizzes. Completing all assignments will be essential for your success in this course.

WR 330 satisfies Baccalaureate Core for Writing II. It does this by guiding students through traditional grammatical forms and terms and by asking them to think critically about writing choices and audience diversity.
BACC Core: Writing ll

 

Course Name: WR 341: Advanced Poetry Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 35151

Instructor: Richter, Jennifer

Class Time: TR 0830-0950

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1000-1200

Location (In Moreland): 204D

Course Description: This course is designed to sharpen the writing, critiquing, and close-reading skills gained in WR 241/341. Through in- and out-of-class exercises, you will work to improve the imagery, voice, lineation, and rhythm of your poems. In this course you will practice the stages of writing; from generative brainstorming to composing solid drafts to polishing accomplished work; revision will be emphasized at every stage. In our rigorous, supportive workshop, we will discuss your poems in depth and offer useful, insightful feedback. We will also read, study, and imitate a variety of contemporary poets as models and inspiration. Prerequisites: WR 241/341 and/or instructor approval.

 


Course Name: WR 353: Writing About Places

Section: 400

CRN: 39709

Instructor: Fearnside, Jeff

Class Time: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: Online

Location (In Moreland): Online

Course Description: In order to communicate effectively with others, we must understand not only where they come from but where we come from. This course is designed to help in that understanding, using place not only to ground us in our mutually entwined dialogues but to provide a jumping off point into new explorations of other places and selves, including our many own. Utilizing personal experience and research, students study, discuss, and practice the conventions of writing about place from a global and local perspective for various audiences. Involves reading contemporary authors of place-based writing, informal and formal writing assignments, research assignments, lectures, group and online activities, and a final portfolio.

 

 

Course Name: WR 362: Science Writing

Section: 400

CRN: 34030

Instructor: Snyder, Wesley

Class Time: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: Ecampus

Location (In Moreland): 300

Course Description: In WR 362, Science Writing, we’ll study the practice and conventions for writing about science to a broader public of non-professionals. We’ll read and analyze some of the best and most influential science journalism from the past few years and see what makes that writing successful, before we write our own news pieces and feature articles, paying attention to both print and digital outlets for that work. While the course addresses some of the more practical skills involved in writing about complex scientific information, we’ll also learn about the models of science communication that support that work. We’ll work on some writing projects together, as an entire class, though all students will have the opportunity to pursue their specific areas of scientific interest – and investigate fields in which OSU excels. Reading and writing assignments have been designed to help students gain greater insight into the issues and challenges of science writing in a variety of contexts.

BACC Core: Writing II

 

 

Course Name: WR 383: Food Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 36212

Instructor: Griffin, Kristin

Class Time: TR 1000-1120

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1130-1230

Location (In Moreland): 354

Course Description: From the recipe to the memoir essay, the investigative feature to the food crawl, this course will expose you to the booming world of food writing. We'll discuss the classics in American food writing; MFK Fisher, Julia Child, James Beard; and read deeply in what's current, from personal blogs like Smitten Kitchen to online magazines like Serious Eats to print magazines like Saveur. Once you have a sense of the genre and its possibilities, each student will become editor, writer, and designer of a new issue of Buckteeth Magazine, an online food magazine associated with the class and produced collaboratively over the course of the term. You'll assign yourself a food-focused story, learn effective strategies for pitching it, and hone your revision skills, earning yourself a spot on the Masthead and a publication for your resume.


 

Course Name: WR 407: Screenwriting: Writing for Television

Section: 1

CRN: 38129

Instructor: Turkel, David

Class Time: M 1600-1850

Instructor Office Hours: M 1300-1500

Location (In Moreland): 306

Course Description: This seminar adopts the practices of a contemporary television "writer's room" in which students work as a group to design a complete season of a TV show. Students will collaborate on group pitches, learn proper script formatting, and practice techniques for plotting well-structured teleplays "beat for beat". Each student will create their own episode within the series, and students will learn how to participate effectively in the "prescriptive"workshop setting unique to the industry. Throughout the course we’ll examine, in both shot and written forms, the varied techniques of master practitioners (Vince Gilligan, David Simon, Jane Campion), as we attempt to understand the elements that unite to structure a TV season, one compelling episode at a time. Students will also have the opportunity to Skype-chat with professional TV writers currently working in the field.

Special Topic: Writing for television


 

Course Name: WR 407: Current Composition Theory

Section: 1

CRN: TBD

Instructor: Ribero, Ana Milena

Class Time: TR 1200-1320

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1400-1500

Location (In Moreland): 318

Course Description: Current Composition Theory will introduce students to theories, practices, and principles in Composition Studies; the academic discipline that investigates how writing creates meaning in the world. We will read landmark research that has shaped the ways in which writing is taught and understood, and delve into contemporary theories and practices that problematize the discipline's intellectual history. Taking on a critical stance, we will analyze how Composition Studies is itself a discourse of power; a system of ideas that assigns value to some writers and their writing at the expense of others. In this way, we will call into question the discipline's assumptions and seek to understand how the teaching of writing is political.

Special Topic: Pedagogy


 

Course Name: WR 414: Advertising and Public Relations Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 37413

Instructor: St Jacques, Jillian

Class Time: MWF 1400-1450

Instructor Office Hours: F 1000-1050

Location (In Moreland): 352

Course Description: Advertising. High-end television commercials and slick fashion ads, blatant spam and pay per click pop-ups. Public relations: town hall campaigns with their tactfully poised messages designed to remedy crisis situations or promote an institution's assets. Although these two fields, advertising and public relations, might seem worlds apart, advertising and public relations actually share a deeply intrinsic task: deploying rhetorical skills to persuade, convince and motivate target audiences to take a desired action. To achieve this aim, professionals in advertising and public relations must be adept at writing in any media form that conveys a message plausibly and expediently. This skill set demands proficiency at generating persuasive prose quickly, creatively and convincingly under tight deadline constraints.


 

Course Name: WR 420: Studies in Writing

Section: 400

CRN: 36063

Instructor: Detar, Liddy

Class Time: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: TBA

Location (In Moreland): Waldo Hall 225

Course Description: This course explores how women's lives are transformed from lived experience into written texts of many different forms: from autobiography, memoir, poetry, fiction to personal essays and academic writing. We will explore what moves us to write the stories of our lives or someone else's and how questions of genre and form are related to the stores we need to tell. Selected texts highlight lives and communities historically marginalized in one way or another, and as we read, we will pay particular attention to articulations of self that both inhabit and resist dominant cultural configurations of gender, sexuality, race, class and ethnicity. What does that resistance to these categories look like in textual form? What are its possibilities and its limits? Through these discussions, we will explore how the acts of writing are performative and strategic representations of the self and of personal experience.

Special Topic: Writing Women's Lives: Representing Resistance, Strategies of Critique


 

Course Name: WR 424: Advanced Fiction Writing

Section: 400

CRN: 35394

Instructor: Larison, John

Class Time: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: Ecampus

Location (In Moreland): 338

Course Description: Welcome to Advanced Fiction Writing, a course that will delve into the subtle mechanics behind compelling, moving, and thematically important fiction. Though our readings this term will focus on short novels, the lessons taught will apply equally well to short stories and long novels.This term, we'll be focusing our inquiries on issues of belief, character, structure ,dialogue, and endings. Also, we'll begin to better define the process of revision used by professional writers. This section ofWR 424 will include guided readings of published work, workshop, and regular writing and commenting.

BACC Core: Writing ll


 

Course Name: WR 424: Advanced Fiction Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 37414

Instructor: Rodgers, Susan

Class Time: TR 1200-1320

Instructor Office Hours: T 13:30-1500 R 1000-1100 & by appointment

Location (In Moreland): 344

Course Description: Our focus will be to explore in deeper and more sophisticated ways both "macro" and "micro" levels of fiction writing. The macro level is narrative structure; how stories are put together and how to choose or create the best possible structure for our material. The micro level is language; words, sentences, paragraphs, openings, titles, transitions, metaphors, etc. We will read, examine, and discuss stories from professional writers as our models. By the end of the term you will have studied and experimented with at least four narrative structures, further developed your critical writing and thinking skills, applied a range of editing strategies to your revision process, played with a variety of sentence types, and widened your knowledge of contemporary authors' work and the creative writing field generally. Assignments include four 3-6 page stories (each one experimenting with a different structure), one revised story, regular readings, quizzes, and a written analysis of a short story.


 

Course Name: WR 441: Advanced Poetry Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 37410

Instructor: Richter, Jennifer

Class Time: TR 0830-0950

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1000-1200

Location (In Moreland): 204D

Course Description: This course is designed to sharpen the writing, critiquing, and close-reading skills gained in WR 241/341.
Through in- and out-of-class exercises, you will work to improve the imagery, voice, lineation, and rhythm of your poems. In this course you will practice the stages of writing; ”from generative brainstorming to composing solid drafts to polishing accomplished work; revision will be emphasized at every stage. In our rigorous, supportive workshop, we will discuss your poems in depth and offer useful, insightful feedback. We will also read, study, and imitate a variety of contemporary poets as models and inspiration. Prerequisites: WR 241/341 and/or instructor approval.


 

Course Name: WR 448: Magazine Writing

Section: 400

CRN: 39704

Instructor: Larison, John

Class Time: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: Ecampus

Location (In Moreland): 338

Course Description: In this course, students will learn to write articles for real-world magazines. Lessons will include: how to build a freelance writing career, how to pitch ideas, how to "break into" new magazines, how to develop feature ideas, and how to develop working relationships with editors. Students will write small articles, query emails, and one feature article. All formal assignments in the class will be targeted to real-world magazines, meaning that students can submit those assignments for publication. Past students have published their work for pay. Most magazines pay their writers between $.30 and 3 dollars a word.

BACC Core: Writing ll


 

Course Name: WR 462: Environmental Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 39206

Instructor: Pflugfelder, Ehren

Class Time: TR 1400-1520

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1300-1400

Location (In Moreland): 212

Course Description: In Environmental Writing, you'll read works by leading environmental thinkers while doing your own environmental writing. We'll work on environmental writing techniques and strategies as a way to think about the environment, communicate important issues, and explore specific topics in ecology, nature writing, wilderness, environmental communication, the Anthropocene, and climate change. You'll learn more about the history of environmental writing in America, and be able to articulate ongoing and currently unfolding debates. We'll talk about environmental theory, trends in science writing, and environmental rhetoric, and head out into the woods for a field trip or two. Bring a waterproof notebook!