Catalog and Schedule:
English
Catalog and Schedule:
Film
Catalog and Schedule:
Writing
 
Course Descriptions
Spring 2018:
English
Course Descriptions
Spring 2018:
Film
Course Descriptions
Spring 2018:
Writing

Winter 2018

Spring 2018

Winter 2018

Spring 2018

Winter 2018

Spring 2018

  ENG 100 Level
ENG 200 Level
ENG 300 Level
ENG 400 Level
FILM 100 Level
FILM 200 Level

WR 100 Level
WR 200 Level
WR 300 Level
WR 400 Level

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Looking for graduate course descriptions? Find them here.

 

  

Download the Spring 2018 Course Descriptions Booklet

 

Course Name: ENG 104: Introduction to Literature

Section: 1

CRN: 50444

Instructor Name: Malewitz, Raymond

Class Meeting Times: MWF 1200-1250

Instructor Office Hours: MW 1500-1550

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 340

Course Description: This course offers a rapid introduction to fiction: the central genre of literary studies. The key questions that we will ask concern the ways that we might categorize the large and heterogeneous output of literary artists over the last two centuries. We will examine the ways that genre classifications can help us to understand the forms and themes of individual stories. We will explore relationship between literature and cultural studies through discussions of race, class, gender, and nation. Finally, we will examine how artists draw upon or depart from the forms, themes, and styles of their literary ancestors as they experiment with storytelling. Each week will consist of two lectures (Mon and Wed) followed by a Friday break-out discussions led by Graduate Student Instructors. Capped at 25 students, these smaller discussions will provide a weekly seminar-style experience for the class that privileges active participation and close mentoring. By the end of the course, students should have a clear sense of how to write and speak about fiction, enabling them to fully engage with this important cultural activity.

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Literature and the Arts

 

Course Name: ENG 104: Introduction to Literature: Fiction

Section: 401

CRN: 58042

Instructor Name: Elbom, Gilad

Class Meeting Times: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: By appointment

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 232

Course Description: Through a close reading of influential works of fiction, this class will explore a variety of literary elements: setting, characters, plot, conflict, motives, emotions, language, style, themes, point of view, and other techniques, devices, and components. We will discuss the conventions of fiction, observe innovative modes of writing, and examine fiction in larger contexts: historical, comparative, structural, theological, modernist, postmodern, psychological, philosophical, feminist, postcolonial, and so on. We will begin with a selection of short stories and end with a famous novel: Mist by Miguel de Unamuno, a tragicomic romance that illuminates the mechanisms of fiction and raises interesting questions about reality and the imagination, God and humanity, author and authorship, and the interplay of writers, fictitious characters, and readers. We will also watch visual narratives that explore some of the basic elements of fiction.

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Literature and the Arts

 

Course Name: ENG 104: Introduction to Literature: Fiction

Section: 400

CRN: 53399

Instructor Name: Larison, John

Class Meeting Times: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: By appointment

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 306

Course Description: Introduction to Fiction offers you a chance to read, ponder, and explore some of the most influential fiction of the last century. Specifically, we'll be focusing our explorations on issues of theme, context, and craft. During the first seven weeks, we'll be reading short stories. During the last three weeks of the course, each student will select one of the course novels (listed on the syllabus) to read and analyze. Expect an inspiring and intellectually rigorous course that prioritizes analysis and discussion.

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Literature and the Arts

Writing Intensive Course: No

 

Course Name: ENG 106: Introduction to Literature: Poetry

Section: 3

CRN: 53388

Instructor Name: Biespiel, David

Class Meeting Times: TR 0830-0950

Instructor Office Hours: TR 0730-0830, 1000-1100

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 228

Course Description: For centuries the reading and discussion of poetry has been required learning for an educated person. Not only that, there are many people throughout the world who reads poems frequently, even daily. To read poems for ten weeks in EN 106 with a group of fellow students from across the university, students with diverse majors and life experiences, is to participate in the highest ideals of your liberal arts education. It is to pursue appreciation for the basic human experience of metaphor and to enjoy thinking imaginatively, critically, and creatively for its own sake. EN 106 is less about solving the meaning of poems and more about exploring the questions of life that poems enter (and looking at how poems do that, too). With focus on the experiences of poems, poets, and readers, with focus on the public and private lives that poems explore, with focus on the pleasures of the arrangement of language and metaphor, and with focus on the cultural, social, political, and spiritual subjects that poems explore, students in EN 106 study study poetry.

Special Topic: The Human Condition

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Literature and the Arts

 

Course Name: ENG 106: Introduction to Literature: Poetry

Section: 2

CRN: 52103

Instructor Name: Biespiel, David

Class Meeting Times: TR 1000-1120

Instructor Office Hours: TR 0730-0830, 1000-1100

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 228

Course Description:For centuries the reading and discussion of poetry has been required learning for an educated person. Not only that, there are many people throughout the world who reads poems frequently, even daily. To read poems for ten weeks in EN 106 with a group of fellow students from across the university, students with diverse majors and life experiences, is to participate in the highest ideals of your liberal arts education. It is to pursue appreciation for the basic human experience of metaphor and to enjoy thinking imaginatively, critically, and creatively for its own sake. EN 106 is less about solving the meaning of poems and more about exploring the questions of life that poems enter (and looking at how poems do that, too). With focus on the experiences of poems, poets, and readers, with focus on the public and private lives that poems explore, with focus on the pleasures of the arrangement of language and metaphor, and with focus on the cultural, social, political, and spiritual subjects that poems explore, students in EN 106 study study poetry.

Special Topic:The Human Condition

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled:Literature and the Arts

 

Course Name: ENG 106: Introduction to Literature: Poetry

Section: 400

CRN: 54145

Instructor Name: Brock, Isabelle

Class Meeting Times: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: By appointment

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 232

Course Description: What is poetry, and why does poetry matter? In this class, we will read, think about, write about, and discuss a wide variety of poems, and we’ll look at poetry through a critical lens. Participation in class discussions and completion of exploratory assignments and guided reading responses make up a significant part of your grade. Activities, quizzes and a final exam allow you to illuminate the understanding you’ve gained.
This course is fully online, and uses Canvas, our online learning platform. In our online learning community, you will access learning materials, complete and submit assignments, and interact with your classmates and with the instructor through the discussion board. ENG 106 satisfies Baccalaureate Core for Literature and the Arts. It does this by asking students to identify literary forms and techniques, to situate them within historical contexts, and to think critically about symbolism and other elements of poetry.
Please note:
This is not a creative writing course, but a course in literary appreciation. If your passion is writing your own poems, please do bring your love of language to the course, but please also understand that in this course we will be studying poems that are already in existence, and learning to appreciate them as art forms.

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Literature and the Arts

 

Course Name: ENG 200: Library Skills for Literary Study

Section: 1

CRN: 56505

Instructor Name: McElroy, Kelly

Class Meeting Times: W 0900-0950

Instructor Office Hours: W 1000-1100

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: Valley Library 2511

Course Description: In this course, we will look at the topic of "library skills" broadly. We will spend time learning how to find and use resources from the OSU Libraries' collections and will think about issues related to information. We will look at how information is organized; knowledge you can use to unlock any collection of information, in a library, on the web, or in an archive. We will also explore how to learn from and integrate primary sources (materials from Special Collections and Archives) into our research; we will examine the expertise, authority and credibility of those who create the information we use; we will learn about fair use and the rights we have to information we create and consume. We will also consider the social, political and economic aspects of information and knowledge production to better understand today's information society. The skills and perspectives you develop in this course will help you to be a successful researcher both during and after college, in whatever field you pursue.

Students are urged to enroll in both ENG 311 and ENG 200; these courses will work together to increase student engagement and success.

 

Course Name: ENG 202: Shakespeare

Section: 1

CRN: 55872

Instructor Name: Olson, Rebecca

Class Meeting Times: TR 1000-1120

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1130-1220 and by appointment

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 244

Course Description: An introduction to the second half of Shakespeare’s dramatic career (the Jacobean period), with attention to the playwright’s continued global influence. This course is designed to help students become confident readers of Shakespeare’s language, articulate the significance of aural and visual elements of Shakespearean scripts, and analyze the plays in light of specific cultural and historical contexts, both early modern and contemporary. Plays include Macbeth, Measure for Measure, and The Tempest. The course is included in two Baccalaureate Core categories: Western Culture and Literature and the Arts.

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Western Culture,Literature and the Arts

 

Course Name: ENG 206: Survey of British Literature: Victorian Era to the Twentieth Century

Section: 400

CRN: 59667

Instructor Name: Ward, Megan

Class Meeting Times: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: By appointment

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: Ecampus

Course Description: Find out the backstory for some of contemporary literature’s most pressing issues. By surveying British literature from the Victorian period to today, we will explore important questions about colonial and postcolonial literature, gender politics, science and technology, and race and national identity. Along the way, we’ll define four major periods of literature (Victorian, modernist, post-modern, and contemporary) and ask whether and why each piece seems to fit the characteristics of its period. Together, these periods tell a story about how and why the British Empire ballooned during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries – and what happens to English literature in its aftermath.

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Western Culture,Literature and the Arts

 

Course Name: ENG 210: Literatures of the World: Asia

Section: 400

CRN: 58018

Instructor Name: Fearnside, Jeff

Class Meeting Times: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: By appointment

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: Ecampus

Course Description: Utilizing multiple perspectives: cultural, geographical, historical, linguistic, political, religious, structural, stylistic, thematic, and other points of view, students read, discuss, analyze, and write about representative works of fiction, both short and long forms, from Asia, with a special emphasis on the literatures of countries along the historic Silk Road. Texts will be examined in a comparative context and analyses expanded with the help of secondary sources. Involves reading modern and contemporary authors, formal writing assignments involving research, lectures, moderated discussions, and online activities.

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Cultural Diversity,Literature and the Arts

 

Course Name: ENG 211H: Literatures of the World: Africa

Section: 1

CRN: 59238

Instructor Name: Osagie, Iyun

Class Meeting Times: MW 1200-1320

Instructor Office Hours: MW 1000-1100 and by appointment

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland:

Course Description: This course introduces students to a variety of genres in precolonial, colonial, and postcolonial African Literature: drama, fiction, the short story, the oral tradition, and poetry. Through a close reading of primary texts and an examination of applicable critical works, we will reflect on the economic, social, and political impact of the colonial encounter between Africa and Europe. Western imperialism manifests in what can be called "the colonial condition," that is, an internal logic and perception of the other in the relationship between the colonizer and the colonized. Our goal is to frame, analytically, African literary output in light of the body of knowledge produced and or circumscribed by the relationship between Africa and the West. No prior knowledge of African Literature is needed.

Special Topic: Introduction to African Literature

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Cultural Diversity,Literature and the Arts,Contemporary Global Issues

 

Course Name: ENG 214: Literatures of the World: Europe

Section: 1

CRN: 59242

Instructor Name: Davison, Neil

Class Meeting Times: TR 1200-1320

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1400-1700

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 230

Course Description: This course presents the student the opportunity to study influential Western literature from the European Continent and Russia during the 19th and 20th centuries. All texts are read in English translations. We will study a selection of 19th century works from Nikolai Gogol’s “The Overcoat,” Gustave Flaubert’s Madame Bovary, the poetry of Charles Baudelaire, or the social critique of Henrik Ibsen’s dramas. We will situate such works within the movements of Romanticism, Realism, Naturalism, and discuss how these aesthetic conventions attach to political ideologies, such as Royalist, Liberal Humanist, Socialist, and Western assumptions surrounding race, gender, and class. 20th-century works include a selection of writers from Italo Svevo to Franz Kafka to Albert Camus to Margueritte Duras. Student performance will be based on grades derived from an in-class mid-term, a 5-7 page term paper, and a final exam.

 

Course Name: ENG 215: Classical Mythology

Section: 1

CRN: 59243

Instructor Name: Barbour, Richmond

Class Meeting Times: MWF 1500-1550

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1100-1130, 1500-1600

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 322

Course Description: Tales of the ancient Greek and Roman gods, epic heroes/heroines, and their monstrous adversaries speak to our primal concerns about the origins and destinies of human beings, the nature of the world, the patterns of our life-journeys, and the mysteries of the spiritual realm. This course will trace the mythic genealogy of the first beings, the Titans, the Olympians, and heroic humans, examining their domains, conflicts, journeys, and amorous encounters. We will study the myths in their primary ancient sources, which include some of the most significant and influential works in the “Western” literary tradition, and relate them to narratives important in our culture today. Interrogating the human uses of story-telling and other muse-inspired arts, we will also explore the representation of the myths in painting, sculpture, and music.

 

Course Name: ENG 220: Topics in Difference, Power and Discrimination

Section: 1

CRN: 59568

Instructor Name: St. Jacques, Jillian

Class Meeting Times: MWF 0900-0950, M 1800-2150

Instructor Office Hours: F 1000-1100

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 352

Course Description: Participants articulate and cross-examine viewpoints concerning the social construction and distribution of difference, power and discrimination in contemporary cinema. By closely analyzing an array of films depicting sexuality to multifarious political and libidinal ends, ENG/FILM220 participants explore the intersection of sex, class, race and age in a variety of film genres. Beginning with overtly heterocentric films like Alfred Hitchcock's "Vertigo" (1958), students explore the alterious possibilities offered by Ang Lee's "Brokeback
Mountain" and Kimberly Peirce's "Boys Don't Cry." Learning to closely reading films, students make connections with diverse and sometimes oppositional critical theories, forming individualized systems of research, writing and personal reflection.

Special Topic: Sexualities in Film

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Difference, Power, and Discrimination

 

Course Name: ENG 253: American Literature: Pre-Columbian to 1900

Section: 1

CRN: 59609

Instructor Name: Sheehan, Elizabeth

Class Meeting Times: MWF 1100-1150

Instructor Office Hours: MW 1200-1330

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 234

Course Description: This course examines literature written before 1900 that observes, imagines, and shapes life in and near what is now the United States of America. The class covers a lot of textual and cultural ground, beginning with indigenous stories of nature and community and concluding with texts that respond to the dynamics of race, gender, nation, and empire at the dawn of the twentieth century. Along the way, we will consider accounts of colonial contact in the Americas, slave narratives and early American ideas about the self, as well as poems and stories about religious devotion, the natural world, violence, and freedom. In addition to introducing students to early American literary texts, this course is designed to teach vital skills for written and verbal literary analysis. Accordingly, a number of the assignments require students to practice close reading and contextual analysis.

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Western Culture,Literature and the Arts

 

Course Name: ENG 254: Survey of American Literature: 1900 to Present

Section: 1

CRN: 59245

Instructor Name: Helle, Anita

Class Meeting Times: TR 1200-1320

Instructor Office Hours: MW 1445-1550

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 224

Course Description: This class offers an introduction to the key figures and movements of American literature from 1900 to the present. The key questions that we will ask concern the ways that we might categorize the diverse production of American writers during this period. We will begin by asking what makes American literature "Modernist" and will conclude with the ways that contemporary writers continue to adapt to and depart from literary modernist traditions. Our focus will be on literary texts, but there will be opportunities to study the relationships among literature and visual, oral, and cinematic texts. In addition to introducing students to modern American literary texts written between 1900-the present, this course is designed to teach vital skills for written and verbal literary analysis. Assignments require students to practice close reading and to make sustained arguments about the significance of texts, sometimes in relation to historical contexts.
Key questions that will inform this course include: how does modern American literature emerge from regional traditions and how is it shaped by the global/international encounters of American writers? What ideas and influences from other disciplines and arts inform modernist writing? How has the concept of “self” and identity (national, geographic, racial, class, gender, generation) changed and evolved over the past 100 years or so of American writing? What linguistic and formal innovations shape what we call modernist style?

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Western Culture,Literature and the Arts

 

Course Name: ENG 254: Survey of American Literature: 1900 to present

Section: 400

CRN: 56518

Instructor Name: Schwartz, Sam

Class Meeting Times: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: By appointment

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 300

Course Description: This ecampus course picks up where English 253 leaves off: at the year 1900. It covers around twelve decades and a highly diverse range of texts. It's designed to provide English majors with a broad foundation of knowledge regarding the most influential themes, genres, and movements from the era, such as naturalism, modernism, the Harlem Renaissance, postmodernism, and the various "schools" of U.S. poetry. However, it's designed to be accessible for students taking it for Bacc Core credit, too. Basic literary concepts will be taught and applied in order to foster an understanding of how literature's aesthetic qualities produce meaning and pleasure while simultaneously operating as "texts" that often address and reflect prominent social and political issues. Students will participate in weekly discussions, take quizzes, contribute to "collective annotations," read short stories, poetry, and some explanatory texts; you'll finish by reading a play and comparing it to one of its film versions. Weekly "close reading" lectures are a key feature of this course, and the discussion will sometimes require some light research. The Norton Anthology of American Literature, vols c, d, and e are required. Ebook versions are allowed (they're much cheaper!).

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled:Western Culture,Literature and the Arts

 

Course Name: ENG 275: The Bible as Literature

Section: 400

CRN: 54991

Instructor Name: Elbom, Gilad

Class Meeting Times: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: By appointment

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 232

Course Description: Emphasizing diversity rather than unity, the Bible is a vast collection of literary genres: stories, poems, genealogies, biographies, prophesies, aphorisms, laws, letters, and many other styles. This class will focus primarily on biblical narrative. Paying attention to a variety of literary techniques, we will try to address the complexity and richness of the Bible rather than reduce it to one truth, a single message, or important lessons. In other words, our approach will be analytical rather than didactic. We will try to broaden and deepen our understanding of the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, and deuterocanonical literature through a careful reading of the text and a close inspection of some biblical scholarship. Ultimately, we will try to approach the Bible from as many perspectives as possible: literary, political, social, theological, linguistic, historical, psychological, philosophical, feminist, structural, postcolonial, and other points of view. We will also inspect samples from other related texts: the Epic of Gilgamesh, the Talmud, and the Quran.

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Western Culture,Literature and the Arts

 

Course Name: ENG 295: Feminism and the Bible

Section: 1

CRN: 59922

Instructor Name: Shaw, Susan

Class Meeting Times: W 1600-1850

Instructor Office Hours: MW 1000-1100

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: Waldo 320B

Course Description: This course examines feminist interpretations of the Bible and pays special attention to intersections of race, social class, sexual identity, and nation in biblical interpretation.

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Literature and the Arts

 

Course Name: ENG 311: Studies in British Prose

Section: 1

CRN: 57501

Instructor Name: Olson, Rebecca

Class Meeting Times: TR 1400-1520

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1130-1220 and by appointment

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 244

Course Description: Utopia: does the word mean “good place” or “no place”? This course will go back to the beginning to explore the characteristics of, and impulses behind, English literary utopias. Part satire, part travel narrative, and part call to action, early utopias helps us think about the role of the imagination in creating ideal communities. Assignments include a researched argument, short fiction, and the creation of a group utopia. Readings include Sir Thomas More’s Utopia, Christine de Pizan’s Book of the City of Ladies, and Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis. This course satisfies the Bacc Core Wic requirement and the upper-division pre-1800 requirement for English majors.

Special Topic: Utopia

Students are urged to enroll in both ENG 311 and ENG 200; these courses will work together to increase student engagement and success.

*Writing Intensive Course

 

Course Name: ENG 319: The American Novel Post World War II

Section: 1

CRN: 50452

Instructor Name: Dybek, Nick

Class Meeting Times: TR 1200-1320

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1320-1420

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 204A

Course Description: In this course we will analyze six novels written since 1945, with a particular eye towards the representation of “haves” and “have-nots” in postwar America. In works by such authors as Marilynne Robinson, Denis Johnson, and Jesmyn Ward, we’ll explore how the lenses of class, wealth, poverty, privilege and consumption both reduce and complicate basic notions of success, failure, alienation, and belonging in America.

 

Course Name: ENG 319: The American Novel: Post-WWII

Section: 400

CRN: 59565

Instructor Name: Elbom, Gilad

Class Meeting Times: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: By appointment

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 232

Course Description: The novels we will read and discuss in this class, each in its own way, offer unique, original, often surprising perspectives on the trauma of World War II, life in a postmodern world, the mechanisms of language and literature, and the construction of narrative, identity, subjectivity, and reality. In Wise Blood (1952), a young ex-soldier returns from the war to challenge common concepts of sin, faith, sincerity, redemption, personal convictions and commercial enterprise, self-sacrifice and mass deception. In Nightmare in Pink (1964), Florida detective Travis McGee is temporarily in New York, trying to protect an attractive woman—and himself—from hallucinatory drugs, a lobotomized millionaire, a corrupt medical institution, and changing codes of masculinity and femininity. His Own Where (1971), a coming-of-age novel written in Black English, calls attention to the fact that domestic sociopolitical struggles may be much harder to win or resolve than major international conflicts. In similar ways, How German Is It (1980) examines familiar notions in new contexts: history, family, national character, intimate relations, and the very idea of fiction.

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Western Culture,Literature and the Arts

Writing Intensive Course: No

 

Course Name: ENG 320: Modern Medievalisms

Section: 1

CRN: 57503

Instructor Name: Bude, Tekla

Class Meeting Times: TR 830-950

Instructor Office Hours: T 1000-1200

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 222

Course Description: Some of the most popular contemporary works of fiction, film, and media take place in worlds that look medieval or that draw on the idea of the medieval period to build speculative universes. What is it about the medieval period that serves as such as proliferate generator of fictional genres and forms? How do contemporary appropriations of the medieval period (with all of their inaccuracies and romanticizations) serve the political, ideological, and aesthetic demands of the present? What new readings of contemporary medievalisms might medieval literary and historical analysis allow? In this course, we will read and consider texts and media from the last century (The Silmarillion, The Name of the Rose, The Princess Bride, Game of Thrones, and others) alongside works of literature from the medieval period (romances and adventure stories, histories and historiography, travelogues and marvelous tales) in order to better understand what we mean when we invoke "the medieval" in contemporary fiction.

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Western Culture,Literature and the Arts

 

Course Name: ENG 345: Introduction to Literary Criticism and Theory

Section: 1

CRN: 53167

Instructor Name: Malewitz, Raymond

Class Meeting Times: MWF 1400-1450

Instructor Office Hours: MW 1500-1550

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 340

Course Description: This course provides a rapid introduction to theories and concepts that drive current literary scholarship. Pairing a selection of critical essays with a diverse set of cultural artifacts (a novella, poems, music videos, film clips, paintings, internet memes, and so on), the course teaches literary theory through application, showing how the same text can yield very different interpretations when viewed through different lenses (New Criticism, Marxism, Gender Theory, Race Theory, Queer Theory, Post-Structuralism, etc.)
By the end of the term, students should be able to:
1.) Identify major theoretical/critical movements and theorists, as well as the primary concepts with which they are associated
2.) Define and apply specific theoretical concepts and terms to literary and cultural texts
3.) Evaluate and analyze strengths and limitations of critical/theoretical arguments in terms of internal logic and specific applications
4.) Examine historical contexts for the development of contemporary theory and criticism
5.) Strengthen critical reading, writing, and interpretive practices for comprehension and analysis

 

Course Name: ENG 362: American Women Writers

Section: 1

CRN: 59246

Instructor Name: Sandor, Marjorie

Class Meeting Times: TR 1000-1120

Instructor Office Hours: T 1130-1230 R 1530-1630

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 314

Course Description: In this course, we will read and examine the work of six great American women writers from the early 20th century to the present, studying both their literary artistry and their diverse representations of women as artists and outsiders, mothers, daughters, sisters, wives and mentors, and in a host of other roles in 20th and 21st century American culture. We will also look at and incorporate selections from theoretical texts as they become applicable during the course. Required work: midterm and final exams, oral and written research presentation, a one-page single-spaced typed analysis, occasional written homework, and a 6-8 page final essay. There will also be occasional quizzes and short in-class writing assignments.

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Literature and the Arts

 

Course Name: ENG 375: Children's Literature

Section: 400

CRN: 58004

Instructor Name: Braun, Clare

Class Meeting Times: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: By appointment

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 136

Course Description: This course surveys a variety of genres, which may include fairy tales, folktales, fables, nonsense poetry, picture books, historical and fantasy novels, examining how these texts represent childhood and connect with historical, cultural, and psychological contexts.
What counts as children’s literature? Is its purpose to entertain, to socialize, to indoctrinate, or something else? In this class, we will tackle these questions (and more) as we examine the development of children’s literature over time, beginning with the first “golden age” of the nineteenth century and ending with our current “golden age” in the twenty-first century. We will think about how conceptions of childhood have changed over time, shaped by and shaping the literature produced for children. Additionally, we will look at children’s literature from the perspective of craft, investigating how literary devices and styles are used by children’s authors to influence the child reader in a myriad of ways.

 

Course Name: ENG 399: Career Prep for English Majors (Special Topics)

Section: 1

CRN: 59561

Instructor Name: Delf, Liz

Class Meeting Times: TR 1200-1250

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1030-1200

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 204D

Course Description: “English major, huh? What are you going to do with that?” Anything you want! English majors become lawyers, software testers, publishers, social media managers, non-profit outreach specialists, and even (as everyone assumes) teachers. The same skills that you’ve used to analyze Bleak House and write about Baldwin can help you in the real world, too. As Frank B. Liebold argues in his 2010 article “Where Have All the Jobs Gone?,” the current job market requires critical thinking and problem solving skills as much as anything else, and these “transferable skill-sets, or competencies, have become the new currency for success and future employability.”
This class is designed for English majors interested in exploring and preparing for post-graduation career options. You’ll consider your own personal strengths and interests, reflect on the English degree and what you’ve gained, and get real interview experience and resume feedback.

Special Topic: Career Prep for English Majors

 

Course Name: ENG 460: Studies in Drama: Classical Greek Drama

Section: 1

CRN: 59247

Instructor Name: Barbour, Richmond

Class Meeting Times: MWF 1300-1350

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1100-1130, 1500-1600

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 322

Course Description: The course examines tragedy and comedy in ancient Athens, where these arts forms originated. Studying powerful dramas vital to the body politic in their own day and crucial to literary and theatrical history ever since, we will read them as both literary texts and theatrical shows. We will examine the myths that imparted action and imagery to the plays, the festivals where they were staged, and the historical pressures that shaped the visions of dramatists and spectators. We will also explore the meaning and impact of classical drama for audiences today. Course requirements include oral presentations, a critical essay, a research paper, and a final exam.

 

Course Name: ENG 488: Literature and Pedagogy

Section: 1

CRN: 57507

Instructor Name: Helle, Anita

Class Meeting Times: TR 1600-1720

Instructor Office Hours: MW 1445-1550

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 224

Course Description: Literature and Pedagogy is designed for students who may be interested in teaching college or secondary English classes in reading and literature (or literature and cultural studies) in 21st century classrooms. The course focuses on reading as a “transaction” between the flesh-and-blood reader, the writer, the text, and the social contexts—classrooms, communities, and youth cultures--in which reading of literature takes place. Points of emphasis may change from term to term, but topics typically include the disposition of readers in the classroom, cultural and critical pedagogies, histories and traditions of “professing literature,” and special issues associated with the teaching of genres and/or media. Assignments include in-class workshops on pedagogical practice, literacy narrative on histories of reading, and a final project shaping a course of study or researching a major figure in the history of literature and culture pedagogies. Connections between reading and writing, lit and comp, are part of the course. Be prepared to be part of a community of readers, scholars, and teachers at the secondary and college levels.

 

Course Name: FILM 220: Difference, Power and Discrimination

Section: 1

CRN: 59569

Instructor Name: St. Jacques, Jillian

Class Meeting Times: MWF 0900-0950 plus mandatory weekly film screenings M 1800-2150

Instructor Office Hours: F 1000-1100

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 352

Course Description: Participants articulate and cross-examine disparate viewpoints concerning the social construction and distribution of difference, power and discrimination in contemporary cinema. By closely analyzing an array of films depicting sexuality to multifarious political and libidinal ends, ENG/FILM220 participants explore the intersection of sex, class, race and age in a variety of film genres. Beginning with overtly heterocentric films like Alfred Hitchcock's "Vertigo" (1958), students explore the alterious possibilities offered by Ang Lee's "Brokeback Mountain" and Kimberly Peirce's "Boys Don't Cry." Learning to closely reading films, students make connections with diverse and sometimes oppositional critical theories, forming individualized systems of research, writing and personal reflection.

Special Topic: Sexualities in Film

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Difference, Power, and Discrimination

 

Course Name: FILM 245: New America Cinema

Section: 400

CRN: 56781

Instructor Name: Rust, Stephen

Class Meeting Times: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: By appointment

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: Ecampus

Course Description: This class will attend post-rating system Hollywood (1968-present) by closely examining the important films and filmmakers of the period along with key events in the business of developing, producing, distributing, and exhibiting motion pictures. This online eCampus section of Film 245 is based on the on-campus version taught by OSU Distinguished Professor Jon Lewis. Course readings examine the development of the modern blockbuster film, auteur theory, the modern US film industry, and the independent film industry. There are no prerequisites for this course. This is an ambitious academic course, not a film appreciation class. As such, students will learn to understand and and apply key vocabulary terms in the study of motion picture texts, such as cinematography, mise-en-scene, editing, and sound design.

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Literature and the Arts

 

Course Name: FILM 256: World Cinema Part 2 (1968-present)

Section: 400

CRN: 59052

Instructor Name: Zuo, Mila

Class Meeting Times: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: By appointment

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 200

Course Description: This course surveys a broad range of non-western art cinemas produced in the modern era. We will discuss significant genres, movements, and authors in conjunction with important historical, industrial, and socio-political developments that impacted national cinemas across Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America. Beginning after the “long decade” of the 1960s and ending in the present day, we discuss the growth of new artistic cinemas produced out of continually changing contexts of transnational filmmaking and globalization. Themes include post-socialist and post-colonial aesthetics; representations of gender and sexuality; historical memory and trauma; and time and temporality. Key filmmakers we will discuss include Wong Kar-wai, Hou Hsiao-hsien, Abbas Kiorastami, Mira Nair, Takeshi Kitano, Souleymane Cissé, and Alfonso Cuaron. We will screen films every week including "The World," "Good Men, Good Women," "Sonatine," "Wend Kuuni," "Y Tu Mama Tambien," "XXY," "Monsoon Wedding," and "A Taste of Cherry."

Special Topic: Non-Western Art Cinemas

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Cultural Diversity,Literature and the Arts

 

Course Name: FILM 399: Film Theory and Criticism

Section: 1

CRN: 60010

Instructor Name: Zuo, Mila

Class Meeting Times: TR 1000-1120

Instructor Office Hours: T 1130-1330

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 200 Moreland

This course offers a survey of significant works and movements in film theory and criticism, from classical to contemporary eras. We begin with the question of what distinguishes film from other visual arts, pursuing questions about the ontology of film, medium specificity, and aesthetics. Then, we proceed with investigations concerning issues of technology, authorship, genre, the avant-garde, gender, race and ethnicity, commercialism, transnationalism, queer theory, and affect. Weekly screenings, which include films like “Get Out,” “American Honey,” “Joy Luck Club,” “Suzhou River,” “Wild at Heart,” “Moonlight,” and “Jeanne Dielman” will supplement class readings, lectures and discussions.  

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Literature and the Arts

 

Course Name: FILM 480: Studies in Film, Culture and Society

Section: 1

CRN: 55873

Instructor Name: Lewis, Jon

Class Meeting Times: W 1800-2150; R 1800-2250

Instructor Office Hours: T 1145-1345

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 312

Course Description: This class offers a multi-media study of the United States during the 1960s, focusing on film and popular music from 1967 and 1968. The class will engage any and all aspects of cultural (that is social and political) history: the Monterey Pop Music Festival, the Democratic Party convention in Chicago, the Vietnam War, and the Mexico City Olympics (at which the Black Power salute became an enduring symbol of the times). Film screenings will range from direct cinema to beach party films, from popular titles like The Graduate and Bonnie and Clyde to the experimental cinema of Andy Warhol. Additional screenings to include Medium Cool, Wild in the Streets, and The Dreamers. Rare footage and music recordings from the Monterey Pop music festival and the San Francisco summer of love will be studied as well. This course builds upon the OSU/Grammy Museum connection and students will be asked to develop an exhibit for and travel to the Grammy Museum in Los Angeles.

 

Course Name: FILM 480: Studies in Film, Culture and Society: Postsocialist Cinema

Section: 2

CRN: 59252

Instructor Name: Nagypal, Tamas

Class Meeting Times: MW 1400-1520 / M 1800-2150

Instructor Office Hours: M 1000-1200

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: Autzen House 203

Course Description: Through the lens of transnational film analysis, the course examines the fundamental sociocultural transformation that countries of Eastern Europe, the Balkans, and East Asia underwent after abandoning their state socialist political systems for neoliberal capitalism. While the nature of this shift ranged from gradual reform (China), through relatively bloodless revolution (Eastern Europe), to civil war (the Balkans), its outcome (rising inequality and insecurity, loss of human rights, return of nationalism and ethnicism) is comparable across different regions. We will therefore consider how the unique aesthetics, narrative themes, and genre formulas of postsocialist cinemas address their local as well as trans-local history of the transition process, its winners and losers, its impact on race, class, and gender relations, and its political and economic role in the expansion of global capitalism after the Cold War. Topics include: the Polish gangster film, the cinema of the Balkans war, postsocialist nostalgia, the Romanian New Wave, film noirs and documentaries of Sixth Generation Chinese filmmakers, and nationalist blockbusters from Russia.

Special Topic: Postsocialist Cinema

 

Course Name: WR 121: Writing Composition

Section: See Course Catalog

Course Description: WR 121 is designed to help students develop skills and confidence in analytical writing. It also emphasizes rhetorical awareness—the perception of where, how, and why persuasion is occurring. This section offers the unique opportunity for collaboration with the Valley Library’s Special Collections and Archives Research Center. Students will engage directly with materials from the University’s collections in the process of writing a high-quality, researched academic essay. Assignments and in-class activities will emphasize and explore the process of writing, including acts of reading, researching, analytical thinking, freewriting, drafting, review, revision, and editing.

BACC Core: Writing 1

 

Course Name: WR 130: Fundamentals of Grammar, Syntax, and Sentence Building

Section: none provided (course begins in Week 3)

CRN: none provided (course begins in Week 3)

Instructor Name: Brock, Isabelle

Class Meeting Times: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: By appointment

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 232

Course Description: This course provides opportunities to improve writing at the sentence level and focuses on the fundamental elements of the sentence (grammar), the principles and rules of sentence structure (syntax), and techniques for writing meaningful, compelling sentences (sentence building). In this course, you'll think through your own history with learning language and consider how that's affected your current relationship with grammar. You will learn to recognize common grammatical errors, how to fix them, and strategies for avoiding them in the first place. You will also combine sentences, select powerful verbs, and develop an understanding of grammar fundamentals and style.
This course maintains a focus on standard grammatical correctness, but recognizes, discusses, and appreciates language differences.
This course is fully online, and uses Canvas, our online learning platform. In our online learning community, you will access learning materials, complete and submit assignments, and interact with your classmates and with the instructor through the discussion board.

 

Course Name: WR 201: Writing for Media

Section: 2

CRN: 51394

Instructor Name: St. Jacques, Jillian

Class Meeting Times: MWF 1200-1250

Instructor Office Hours: F 1000-1100

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 352

Course Description: Since the popularization of the Internet in the 1980s, we've witnessed a veritable explosion of media culture. There are still the "traditional" media outlets (magazines, newspapers, television, radio) but the advent of interactive media has given rise to new forms of journalism; instantaneously breaking "citizen reporting" on blogs and podcasts, Twitter feeds and YouTube webcasts. Although these media forms engage different visual and linguistic styles of representation and appear to conform to different rules, the core skill set in writing for media remains the ability to generate tight, accurate, insightful stories about real-time events at a moment's notice. WR201 students begin the course by learning to formulate headlines, deks and summary leads using the inverted pyramid style. Having gained command of a basic writer's toolbox, participants progress to pitching and generating their own reviews, feature stories and profile articles.

 

Course Name:WR 201: Writing for Media

Section: 4

CRN: 53647

Instructor Name: St. Jacques, Jillian

Class Meeting Times: MWF 1400-1450

Instructor Office Hours: F 1000-1100

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 352

Course Description: Since the Internet boom of the 1980s, there's been an explosion of media culture. There are still the "traditional" media -- television, radio, and print journalism -- but there are "new" forms of mass communication; instantaneously breaking "citizen reporting" on blogs and podcasts, Twitter feeds,YouTube webcasts and online 'zines. Although these media forms engage different visual and linguistic styles of representation, the core skill set in writing for media remains the ability to generate tight, accurate, insightful stories about real-time events at a moment's notice. Learning to formulate headlines, deks and summary leads using the inverted pyramid style. students progress to pitching and generating their own reviews, feature stories and profile articles.

 

Course Name: WR 214: Business Writing

Section: See Course Catalog

Course Description: Thoughtful and thorough communication across multiple audiences and for multiple purposes continues to be an extremely important skill set in business. Writing in Business helps you build these skills and makes use of different networked technologies, software, and online materials in order to broaden your understanding of where, why, and how writing in the workplace happens. You’ll learn the principles and practices necessary for writing ethical and effective business letters, memos, and reports for a range of professional contexts. WR 214 will also help you present yourself as a professional, research job opportunities, write materials for job applications, and then land the position you want. The work you’ll do in this course is informed by current research in rhetoric and professional writing and is guided by the needs and practices of business, industry, and society at large.

BACC Core: Writing lI

 

Course Name: WR 222: English Composition

CRN: See Course Catalog

Course Description: Argument may seem like a simple word; it’s anything but. One look at the title of your textbook supports that claim. Arguments live in everything we see, think and do. They can be as overt as a Presidential debate and as subtle as a paint color. When you start seeing argumentation in this way, the possibilities are endless. As varied as arguments come, there are tried and true constants in the analysis and crafting of their myriad messages. Arguments are conversations. There is more than one voice in the room. They are grounded in the art of persuasion. They succeed and fail on an understanding of audience. In this course, you will learn the basics of what goes into good argumentative writing through extensive reading, analyzing, brain storming, peer reviewing, revising, debating and (of course) writing. You will develop strategies to help you interpret a variety of texts and compose in a variety of media. This course will show you how a sound argument moves, considering structure, support and form. You will improve your ability to revise your ideas, the reasoning that supports those ideas, and the writing that illustrates them.
BACC Core Fulfillment: Writing ll

 

Course Name: WR 224: Introduction to Fiction Writing

Section: 2

CRN: 50483

Instructor Name: Griffin, Kristin

Class Meeting Times: TR 1000-1120

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1245-1345

Instructor Office in Moreland: 354

Course Description: This course is an introduction to the study and practice of fiction writing. This course focuses exclusively on the analysis and composition of short stories. I like to think of the class as having two parts. In Part 1, you will read deeply in the genre and learn the foundations of the craft of fiction writing from characterization to setting to point of view. Readings for the class are diverse, drawn from the work of some of the strongest writers we have today from Karen Russel to Jhumpa Lahiri to Tobias Wolff. In Part 2, you and your peers take the reigns, as each of you will compose your own pieces of short fiction and the majority of what we read and discuss will be your own writing. There is no final, but you’ll be responsible for creating a final portfolio in which you include your original workshop story, describe your revision process in a cover letter, and present the final version of your short story. Workshop story revisions will be celebrated with an in-class reading at the end of the term.

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled:Writing ll

 

Course Name: WR 224: Introduction to Fiction Writing

Section: 400

CRN: 52618

Instructor Name: Harrison, Wayne

Class Meeting Times: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: By appointment

Instructor Office in Moreland: Ecampus

Course Description:This online fiction writing workshop examines the basic techniques of fiction, with related creative writing exercises and assessment. We will discuss literary craft elements that include characterization, significant detail, dialogue, voice, point of view, tone, pacing and setting, as well as figurative language concepts such as symbolism, metaphor and theme. Students will develop a critical vocabulary with which to analyze how successfully fiction meets the expectations of literature. They will study the work of professional fiction writers and apply the principles of contemporary fiction to their own writing to establish dimensional characters and plotlines, and to create dialogue that is rich and revealing, and exploring aspects of narrative, point of view, tone, pacing, plot, and theme, which they will utilize in creating and revising a satisfying short story. They will also critique the creative work of their fellow students in weekly peer review workshops. Assessment methods include creative writing exercises, quizzes and reading checks on textbook craft sections, peer review, and the evolution of a short story from rough draft to a 10 page final draft that meets the structural and thematic qualifications of literature.

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Writing ll

 

Course Name: WR 241: Introduction to Poetry Writing

Section: 400

CRN: 58022

Instructor Name: Roush, Stephanie

Class Meeting Times: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: MWF 1100-1200

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 358

Course Description: “A poet is, before anything else, a person who is passionately in love with language” ― W.H. Auden. In this course, we will explore the poetic craft and immerse ourselves in language as both readers and writers. This course will provide a firm grounding in the rudiments of poetic craft such as word choice, line breaks, imagery, and sound, as well as an introduction to different forms available to poets. We will consistently work through writing exercises and read the work of various poets in order to aid us in the generation of our own poems. I hope that you will become genuinely attached to the works/words of a few, if not all, of the poets we engage.

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Writing ll

 

Course Name: WR 301: Publishing and Editing

Section: 400

CRN: 59583

Instructor Name: Love, Jennifer

Class Meeting Times: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: By appointment

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: Ecampus

Course Description: WR 301 invites participants to gain and demonstrate knowledge of editing and copyediting techniques, broader editorial decisions, and online publishing platforms. We will explore editing within a rhetorical dimension, considering purpose and audience, as well as conventions of grammar, mechanics, and usage. Participants will be asked to analyze an online literary magazine or journal from an editorial perspective; as well as choose, edit, and comment on a Wikipedia article as a contribution to a collaborative online publication. Weekly discussion of readings, videos, and related activities, as well as informal, low-stakes quizzes that allow participants to implement their knowledge of editing, will contribute to an interactive learning environment. Participants will be asked to read, respond to, and edit/copyedit one another's writing to gain firsthand experience with editing and copyediting. A balance of individual projects and collaboration among participants will be featured in the course.

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Writing ll

 

Course Name: WR 303: Writing for the Web

Section: 1

CRN: 55311

Instructor Name: Jensen, Tim

Class Meeting Times: TR 1000-1120

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1300-1430 and by appointment

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 204B

Course Description: Writing for the Web will prepare students to produce rhetorically savvy writing for web-based platforms and applications. Web-based writing is often crafted differently, as it's often concerned with helping people find information, get things done, convey their opinions, build communities, and collaborate on complex projects. Writing for the Web will teach students strategies and principles for analyzing and producing writing that is specifically designed for web circulation. Instruction is grounded in rhetorical theory, guided by current research in digital rhetoric and technical writing, and attuned to current multimedia writing platforms and practices.

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Writing ll

 

Course Name: WR 323: English Composition

Section: 400

CRN: 52617

Instructor Name: Peters, Patrick

Class Meeting Times: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: T 0900-1100

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: NA

Course Description: Writing and the reading of writing are social processes that encourage the reader to interpret and respond to texts in varied, unique, and often complex ways. Students in WR 323 will be asked to read and respond to the work of others and compose their own texts with a heightened awareness of style, or the way in which language is used to clearly and gracefully articulate one’s own worldview. Students will be challenged to conceive of and develop their own style, focusing on elements of diction, tone, emphasis, shape and clarity.

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Writing ll

 

Course Name: WR 324: Short Story Writing

Section: 400

CRN: 59579

Instructor Name: Brock, Isabelle

Class Meeting Times: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: By appointment

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 232

Course Description: This section of Short Story Writing focuses on flash fiction—the very short story. We will read a wide range of flash fictions, and we’ll discuss what might make a piece of flash fiction successful. We’ll evaluate the snap-shot feel of a 1000 (or fewer!) word story, and we’ll identify and question elements of traditional stories.
Students will write a minimum of three flash fictions, and submit them for student and instructor feedback in a workshop discussion board. Students will also read and discuss numerous flash fictions and be exposed to a wide variety of resources for creative writers online. This course makes use of open-source materials; no textbook is required.
This course is fully online, and uses Canvas, our online learning platform. In our online learning community, you will access learning materials, complete and submit assignments, and interact with your classmates and with the instructor through the discussion board. WR 324 satisfies the Writing II requirement for Bacc Core. It does this by challenging students to write creative short fiction, think critically about writing, and undergo a writing process including revision and reflection.

Special Topic: Flash Fiction

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Writing ll

 

Course Name: WR 324: Short Story Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 50486

Instructor Name: Sandor, Marjorie

Class Meeting Times: TR 1400-1520

Instructor Office Hours: T 1130-1230 R 1530-1630

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 314

Course Description: In this intermediate level course we will explore, through your own imaginative writing and the analysis of masterful professional short fiction, the art and craft of the literary short story. The main question: how do elements of the writer's craft--imagery, point of view, character and story structure--contribute to a story's effect on us as readers? Written work required: three sketches, two short stories (6 to 8 pages in length), written analyses of all peer and professional works of fiction, regular attendance and active participation in class discussion. We will also be reading a textbook, Reading Like a Writer, and exploring the art of emulating professional story writers' by looking at several "updates" of three famous short stories. Please note: genre fiction, including science fiction, fantasy, romance, and children’s literature, will not be considered in this class. Prerequisite: Wr 224.

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Writing ll

 

Course Name: WR 324: Short Story Writing

Section: 2

CRN: 57516

Instructor Name: Scribner, Keith

Class Meeting Times: T 1800-2050

Instructor Office Hours: MW 1400-1500

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 308

Course Description: In this course we will study the basic elements of fiction—character, dialogue, point of view, tone, and so on—to further develop our understanding of fictional techniques. Our class will combine reading, writing, and discussion. Assignments will include one full-length short story (6-10 pages), a short short, five writing exercises, and written critiques on workshop stories
In order to understand how fiction is put together—how the raw material of inspiration is transmuted into art—we will read and discuss in class a selection of short stories. We will try to understand these works in terms of why the author has made the aesthetic choices he or she has made. Why first person? Why third person? Why is X the narrator rather than Y? Why the present tense? Why dramatize this scene; why narrate this information?
Genre fiction, such as sci fi, bodice-ripping romance, mystery, fantasy, young adult, will not be considered.
Prerequisite: WR 224
This is not a remedial course. It is assumed that submitted work will not contain basic grammatical, punctuation, or spelling errors. All work must be typed and double-spaced with roughly one inch margins. Number your pages. Title every piece. Proofread, don’t just spell-check.

 

Course Name: WR 327: Technical Writing

Section: See Course Catalog

Course Description: WR 327 will prepare you to produce instructive, informational, and persuasive documents aimed at well-defined and achievable outcomes. Technical documents are precise, concise, and organized, but often based on complex information. However, the purpose and target audience of each document often determines how that information is presented, including writing style, document layout, vocabulary, sentence and paragraph structure, and visuals, among other factors. To this end, this course teaches processes for analyzing writing contexts and producing effective, clean, and reader-centered documents in an efficient manner. Grounded in rhetorical theory, WR 327 presents contemporary research in technical communication and instructs students in current best practices. Individually and in groups, students learn effective strategies for communicating with technology in the modern, networked workplace.

BACC Core: Writing ll

 

Course Name: WR 330: Understanding Grammar

Section: 402

CRN: 52643

Instructor Name: Brock, Isabelle

Class Meeting Times: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: By appointment

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 232

Course Description: WR 330 is an advanced study of traditional grammatical forms and conventional grammatical terms with emphasis on the assumptions underlying the structure of traditional grammar. As a 300-level course, this class will require significant student practice, discussion, and evaluation. In this course, we will study the sentence—its structure, and all the possible ways to create one. We’ll gain the vocabulary to discuss language; we’ll read and demonstrate comprehension of relevant theory, concepts, and techniques for understanding grammatically correct communication; and we’ll develop appreciation of language, form, and style.
This course is fully online, and uses Canvas, our online learning platform. In our online learning community, you will access learning materials, complete and submit assignments, and interact with your classmates and with the instructor through the discussion board. You will learn through reading assignments, homework completion, class discussions, various guided activities, discourse analysis projects, and weekly quizzes. Completing all assignments will be essential for your success in this course. WR 330 satisfies Baccalaureate Core for Writing II. It does this by guiding students through traditional grammatical forms and terms and by asking them to think critically about writing choices and audience diversity.

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Writing ll

 

Course Name: WR 330: Understanding Grammar

Section: 1

CRN: 59562

Instructor Name: Brock, Isabelle

Class Meeting Times: R 1400-1520

Instructor Office Hours: R 1300-1400 and Online

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 232

Course Description: This course is an advanced study of traditional grammatical forms and conventional grammatical terms with emphasis on the assumptions underlying the structure of traditional grammar. As a 300-level course, this class will require significant student practice, discussion, and evaluation. In this course, we will study the sentence—its structure, and all the possible ways to create one. We’ll gain the vocabulary to discuss language; we’ll read and demonstrate comprehension of relevant theory, concepts, and techniques for understanding grammatically correct communication; and we’ll develop appreciation of language, form, and style.
You will learn through reading assignments, homework completion, class discussions, various guided activities, discourse analysis projects, and weekly quizzes. Completing all assignments will be essential for your success in this course.
WR 330 satisfies Baccalaureate Core for Writing II. It does this by guiding students through traditional grammatical forms and terms and by asking them to think critically about writing choices and audience diversity.

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled: Writing ll

 

Course Name:WR 341: Intermediate Poetry Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 52578

Instructor Name: Holmberg, Karen

Class Meeting Times: TR 1400-1750

Instructor Office Hours: W 1300-1500

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 350

Course Description: In this poetry course, 341 students will further refine the skills gained in WR 241: recognizing the poetic subject, using vivid and accurate language, creating appropriate metaphors and imagery, breaking lines effectively, and maximizing the musicality and rhythmic intensity of poetic lines. 441 students will continue work on these skills as well, while expanding the complexity, ambition, and literary sophistication of their poems; more demanding variations of the poem prompts will be provided, and other graded projects will be required. The focus of our class will be on creating character. Students will gain practice in writing poems in persona, and in the less-used third person point of view; we will also consider the use of setting and detail to develop character. Projects include a poem on a documentary photograph, a poem set in either the future or at least 100 years in the past, and a poem based off a study of ephemera, journals, and other materials in the Valley Library’s Special Collections. During this course, students will read widely, using a variety of on line anthologies.

 

Course Name: WR 362: Science Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 55877

Instructor Name: Conner, Roby

Class Meeting Times: MWF 1300-1350

Instructor Office Hours: MWF 1200-1250

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 328

Course Description: WR 362: Science Writing explores the practice and conventions for writing about science to a public audience of non-professionals. We will read and analyze some of the best and most influential science journalism from the past few years to see what makes that writing successful. The course addresses the practical skills involved in writing about complex scientific information and the models of science communication that those skills enable. Then we’ll write our own news pieces and feature articles focused that communicate that information to the public. Students will explore their specific areas of scientific interest and work to inspire that same interest in their audience, both in print and online. Reading and writing assignments have been designed to help students gain greater insight into the issues and challenges of science writing in a variety of contexts.

BACC Core Requirement Fulfilled:Writing ll

 

Course Name: WR 407: Seminar in Screenwriting

Section: 1

CRN: 38129

Instructor Name: Turkel, David

Class Meeting Times: T 1400-1650

Instructor Office Hours: M 1300-1500

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 306

Course Description: Fundamentally, this is a seminar about story structure—how to recognize, analyze and utilize its salient features as creative practitioners. In simplest terms, this structure can be boiled down to beginning, middle and end. Yet, clearly, there’s more to it. All stories end; not all feel complete. This sense of completion doesn’t derive from our characters—however well-drawn—or even their circumstances—however vivid and compelling they may be. It results directly from a story’s internal scaffolding, its structure. Students in this course will examine the underlying architecture which unites sitcom pilots with masterworks of the cinema and the stage, as they plot their own story outlines (or "beat-sheets") and practice the fundamentals of professional screenplay formatting. They will meet—via Skype and in-class visitation—with seasoned professionals, present pitches and short-form creative assignments, and participate in the “prescriptive” workshop setting relatively unique to the industry.

Writing Intensive Course: Yes

 

Course Name: WR 408: Advanced Nonfiction Workshop

Section: 1

CRN: 59257

Instructor Name: Passarello, Elena

Class Meeting Times: T 1600-1850

Instructor Office Hours: T 1400-1600

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 342

Course Description: This is an advanced creative nonfiction workshop. Students with upper-level experience in any creative genre (Intermediate Nonfiction, Writing the Short Story, or Intermediate Poetry Writing) or in SWLF's specialty professional writing courses (Arts Writing, Food Writing, Magazine Writing, etc) are welcome to register. Over the course of the term, we will build a nonfiction writing group. Mimicking the working style of a professional prose cohort, the class will devise, draft, and polish nonfiction essays via a series of generative prompts. Then the class will deeply discuss their creative work in formal, MFA-style workshops. Over the course of the term, the class will also dissect some of the most riveting personal essays, memoirs, graphic texts, and works of literary journalism from the most recent Best American Essays anthologies, including work by Zadie Smith, David Foster Wallace, Francisco Cantu, and Leslie Jamison. Expect a fun and lively course with lots of creative activities, discussions, and a serious evaluation of your creative activity.

 

Course Name: WR 414: Advertising and Public Relations Writing

Section: 400

CRN: 58026

Instructor Name: St. Jacques, Jillian

Class Meeting Times: Ecampus

Instructor Office Hours: F 1000-1100

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 352

Course Description: To the casual observer, public relations and advertising might seem like two distinctly separate fields. Yet consider the use of slogan and branding in contemporary advertising, The Real Thing. Make America Great Again. Red Bull Gives You Wings. Each of these slogans relates to a specific product and historical moment. Now, consider the use of similar rhetorical tactics in public relations, with its poised messages and talking points designed to remedy a crisis or promote an institutions assets. Although advertising and public relations might seem worlds apart, they actually share a deeply intrinsic task: deploying rhetorical skills to persuade, convince and motivate target audiences to take a desired action. This skill set demands proficiency at generating persuasive prose quickly, creatively and convincingly under deadline constraints. Assembling two multi-document portfolios in an advertising campaign and a press kit. WR414 participants hone skills at crafting their writing for advertising and public relations.

 

Course Name: WR 420: Studies in Writing: Style and the Sentence

Section: 1

CRN: 55015

Instructor Name: Anderson, Chris

Class Meeting Times: MWF 0900-0950

Instructor Office Hours: MWF 1000-1050

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 324

Course Description: A course in the writing of sentences, and the enjoying of sentences, and the analyzing of sentences. For creative writers, academic writers, all writers. Will only be writing sentences, hundreds of them. Nothing beyond the level of the sentence. An exercise class in a way: every day in class we'll be doing things with sentences, even diagramming them. Imitating them. Content won't matter. Originality won't matter. Just sentences, all over the place. You'll keep a notebook and keep track of everything there. Also, some reading in the theory of the sentence, in rhetoric and comp studies. The idea: to give you tools for making your sentences clearer, sharper, and more direct, whatever kind of writing you do. So mastery. But also: mystery. A sense of the mystery and beauty of the sentences we write and the sentences we read and the sentences we hear. Texts: Joseph Williams, STYLE; Moutoux, DRAWING SENTENCES.

Special Topic: Style and the Sentence

 

Course Name: WR 424: Advanced Fiction Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 51056

Instructor Name: Dybek, Nick

Class Meeting Times: TR 1000-1120

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1320-1420

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 204A

Course Description: This term we’ll continue to build on the skills studied in WR 224 and WR 324 by reading and discussing both published and student stories with an eye towards how the pieces are constructed and crafted. Our particular focus, though, will be on reading and crafting our own “linked” short stories—that is, a collection or group of stories that can be read and understood alone and on their own terms but also work together to form a longer and cohesive narratives via such confluences as character, setting and voice. By the end of the term expect to read three linked collections of published work and to have produced your own mini collection of at least three “linked” stories.

 

Course Name: WR 441: Advanced Poetry Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 52788

Instructor Name: Holmberg, Karen

Class Meeting Times: TR 1400-11520

Instructor Office Hours: W 1300-1500

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 350

Course Description: In this poetry course, 341 students will further refine the skills gained in WR 241: recognizing the poetic subject, using vivid and accurate language, creating appropriate metaphors and imagery, breaking lines effectively, and maximizing the musicality and rhythmic intensity of poetic lines. 441 students will continue work on these skills as well, while expanding the complexity, ambition, and literary sophistication of their poems; more demanding variations of the poem prompts will be provided, and other graded projects will be required. The focus of our class will be on creating character. Students will gain practice in writing poems in persona, and in the less-used third person point of view; we will also consider the use of setting and detail to develop character. Projects include a poem on a documentary photograph, a poem set in either the future or at least 100 years in the past, and a poem based off a study of ephemera, journals, and other materials in the Valley Library’s Special Collections. During this course, students will read widely, using a variety of on line anthologies.

 

Course Name: WR 448: Magazine Article Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 59258

Instructor Name: Griffin, Kristin

Class Meeting Times: TR 1400-1520

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1245-1345

Instructor Office Hours in Moreland: 354

Course Description: This course will guide you through the process of querying, writing, and selling your first magazine article. Reading deeply in the genre, both in print and online, you will develop an understanding of the marketplace and learn strategies for building a freelance writing practice. This includes considerations of what makes for a good magazine article, discussions about recognizing and cultivating expertise, and exercises intended to hone your unique voice. You'll be introduced to valuable resources, will have the opportunity to chat with active editors, and will share your work with peers during in-class workshops. We'll discuss the freelance marketplace and you will be encouraged to follow your own personal interests wherever they may lead, from snowboarding to fly fishing to travel and food. Course readings will be current and varied, reflecting the freelance marketplace as it exists today. Expect a practical nuts and bolts class, one that leaves you a stronger and more confident writer.