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Course Descriptions
Fall 2017:
English

Course Descriptions
Fall 2017:
Film

Course Descriptions
Fall 2017:
Writing

Spring 2017

Summer 2017

Fall 2017

Spring 2017

Summer 2017

Fall 2017

Spring 2017

Summer 2017

Fall 2017

 


ENG 100 Level
ENG 200 Level
ENG 300 Level
ENG 400 Level
ENG Graduate Courses

FILM 200 Level
FILM 400 Level
FILM Graduate Courses

WR 100 Level
WR 200 Level
WR 300 Level
WR 400 Level
WR Graduate Courses


 
Download the Fall Term 2017 Course Descriptions Booklet!

Fall Term 2017 Course Descriptions

Course Name: ENG 104: Introduction to Literature: Fiction
Section: 2
CRN: 17468
Instructor: Davison, Neil
Time: M W F 1000-1050
Instructor Office Hours: M W F 1400-1600
Instructor Office: 230
Course Description: This course will introduce the student to the structural and thematic rudiments of narrative prose fiction and the concepts of both critical interpretation and contextual analysis through the study of the short story genre. We will learn and practice the skill of close reading so as to conduct character, structural, symbol, and linguistic analyses toward the drawing of major thematic inferences. The class will read a series of late-19th and 20th century short stories, examining the texts and their respective historical, cultural, and philosophical contexts as entrances into forming interpretive arguments about the meanings and implications of each story. Students will be evaluated through a series of weekly quizzes and essay-question in-class midterm and final examinations.
BACC Core Fulfillment: Literature and the Arts
   
Course Name: ENG 104: Introduction to Literature Fiction
Section: 402
CRN: 26423
Instructor: Larison, John
Time: Ecampus
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Instructor Office: 306
Course Description: Introduction to Fiction offers you a chance to read, ponder, and explore some of the most influential short stories and novels of the last century.  Specifically, we'll be focusing our explorations on issues of theme, context, and craft.  Expect an inspiring and intellectually rigorous class, one in which you will produce several short writing assignments and two papers. 

We'll read short stories for the first two thirds of the course, then move into novels.  Each student will pick one novel to read, either THE HANDMAID'S TALE or THE ROAD; final papers will be written on this novel.  Throughout each week, we'll be learning to identify key elements from the text and make persuasive arguments involving those elements; these skills will leave you ready for textual analysis in your career--or advanced study in the liberal arts.  
BACC Core Fulfillment: Literature and the Arts
   
Course Name: ENG 104: Introduction to Literature: Fiction
Section: 3
CRN: 17469
Instructor: Scribner, Keith
Time: T R 1400-1520
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Instructor Office: 308
Course Description: In this course we'll read short stories and two novels.  As we proceed through the term, our focus will be on close reading and how these works achieve aesthetic and emotional affect through fictional craft, such as plot, character, setting, voice, and symbolism. Course outcomes will include developing skills in textual analysis, close reading, and critical thinking and writing. We'll examine these works for their historical, literary, social, and political significance, as well as their varying styles and themes, keeping in mind that they are first and foremost works of art. "The value of great fiction...is not just that it entertains us or distracts us from our troubles, not just that it broadens our knowledge of people and places, but also that it helps us to know what we believe, reinforces those qualities that are noblest in us, leads us to feel uneasy about our faults and limitations." - John Gardner, The Art of Fiction
BACC Core Fulfillment: Literature and the Arts
   
Course Name: ENG 104: Introduction to Literature: Fiction
Section: 6
CRN: 21834
Instructor: Elbom, Gilad
Time: T R 0830-0950
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1300-1400
Instructor Office: 232
Course Description: One of our main goals in this class would be to pay close attention to the basic elements of fiction: setting, narration, characters, plot, conflict, tension, motives, emotions, language, style, themes, point of view, and other literary techniques, devices, components, and aspects. Our primary text, Miguel de Unamuno's Mist (1914), is a famous masterpiece that explores the conventions of fiction itself. We will use this novel as a point of entry into a discussion of some crucial questions about the history, nature, and function of literary fiction. We will also read a selection of short stories and watch visual narratives that explore some of the basic elements of fiction.
BACC Core Fulfillment: Literature and the Arts
   
Course Name: ENG 104: Introduction to Literature: Fiction
Section: 1
CRN: 17467
Instructor: Bushnell, JT
Time: M W F 1400-1450
Instructor Office Hours: M W F 1050-1150
Instructor Office: 328
Course Description: This course will introduce students to prose fiction through the short story and novel, with particular (but not exclusive) focus on American writers from the last century. You will learn to read closely for fundamental craft concepts such as description, characterization, conflict, point of view, structure, symbolism, and theme. You will also be asked to think critically about the ideas and issues you encounter. By the end of the term, you will have received exposure to a broad array of narratives, cultures, and ideas, and will have developed the skills to analyze them for meaning and value. 
BACC Core Fulfillment: Literature and the Arts
   
Course Name: ENG 104: Introduction to Literature: Fiction
Section: 400
CRN: 21361
Instructor: Harrison, Wayne
Time: Online
Instructor Office Hours: Online 
Instructor Office: 306
Course Description: This Ecampus course will examine contemporary fiction from the perspective of a fiction writer. In our analysis of two short story collections and two novels, we will study the elements of craft including characterization, significant detail, dialogue, voice, point of view and theme. Students will develop a critical vocabulary with which to deepen their knowledge of the artistic techniques and forms that writers employ in their work, as well as a familiarity with intellectual strategies that literary critics use to interpret and discuss literary works. Student progress will be assessed by reading quizzes, a midterm and final exam, and weekly discussion posts.  
BACC Core Fulfillment: Literature and the Arts
   
Course Name: ENG 104: Introduction to Literature: Fiction
Section: 401
CRN: 26422
Instructor: Harrison, Wayne
Time: Online
Instructor Office Hours: Online
Instructor Office: 306
Course Description: This Ecampus course will examine contemporary fiction from the perspective of a fiction writer. In our analysis of two short story collections and two novels, we will study the elements of craft including characterization, significant detail, dialogue, voice, point of view and theme. Students will develop a critical vocabulary with which to deepen their knowledge of the artistic techniques and forms that writers employ in their work, as well as a familiarity with intellectual strategies that literary critics use to interpret and discuss literary works. Student progress will be assessed by reading quizzes, a midterm and final exam, and weekly discussion posts.  
BACC Core Fulfillment: Literature and the Arts
   
Course Name: ENG 104: Introduction to Literature: Fiction
Section: 1
CRN: 19266
Instructor: Delf, Liz
Time: M W F 1500-1550
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Instructor Office: 204D
Course Description: What is a story? How does fiction create or reflect the culture and historical moment in which they are written? Why do we (or why should we) read literature at all? What does it tell us about the human experience? In this class, we will build answers to these foundational questions. Using a critical lens, we will work to understand both the implied and stated meaning of short stories and a novel from the last two centuries, as well as developing our knowledge of the key elements of fiction.
   
Course Name: ENG 106: Intro to Literature: Poetry
Section: 3
CRN: 22800
Instructor: Biespiel
Time: T R 1200-1320
Instructor Office Hours: T R 0730-0830
Instructor Office: 228
Course Description: For centuries the reading and discussion of poetry has been required learning for an educated person. Not only that, there are many people throughout the world who reads poems frequently, even daily. To read poems for ten weeks in EN 106 with a group of fellow students from across the university, students with diverse majors and life experiences, is to participate in the highest ideals of your liberal arts education. It is to pursue appreciation for the basic human experience of metaphor and to enjoy thinking imaginatively, critically, and creatively for its own sake. EN 106 is less about solving the meaning of poems and more about exploring the questions of life that poems enter (and looking at how poems do that, too). With focus on the experiences of poems, poets, and readers, with focus on the public and private lives that poems explore, with focus on the pleasures of the arrangement of language and metaphor, and with focus on the cultural, social, political, and spiritual subjects.
   
Course Name: ENG 106: Introduction to Literature: Poetry
Section: 2
CRN: 21189
Instructor: Gottlieb, Evan
Time: M W F 1100-1150
Instructor Office Hours: M  W F 1000-1050
Instructor Office: 362
Course Description: This is a broad introduction to the study of poetry. For most of the course, we'll read poems from some of the greatest poets in the English language, both historical and contemporary. The final unit focuses on a volume of contemporary poetry by a living American poet. Throughout, we will focus on learning to read poetry for both enjoyment and critical understanding, while gaining some sense of its key formal features, linguistic range, and ongoing cultural relevance. Throughout, we will investigate what makes poetry different from prose, and how those differences allow it to have different effects on readers.
BACC Core Fulfillment: Literature and the Arts
   
Course Name: ENG 106: Introduction to Literature: Poetry 
Section: 1
CRN: 18121
Instructor: Holmberg, Karen
Time: T R 0830-0950
Instructor Office Hours: T 1300-1400 and R 1000-1100
Instructor Office: 350
Course Description: This course provides an overview of the main modes, techniques, and characteristics of poetry through an examination of world poetry. Using anthology readings and the on-line resources, the course will cover world poetry by geographical region (Africa, Europe, Middle East, Asia) and will feature 4 units focused on relevant topics or themes within world poetry: Poetics and Craft; Poetry as Cultural Performance; Poetry as Social Action and Historical Witness; Translation and Influence. During each unit, we will also study the poetic devices nearly universal to poetry, such as rhythm, sound play, image, symbol, metaphor, point of view, and tone.
BACC Core Fulfillment: Literature and the Arts
   
Course Name: ENG 106: Introduction to Literature: Poetry 
Section: 400
CRN: 21963
Instructor: Brock, Isabelle
Time: Ecampus
Instructor Office Hours: by appointment and online 
Instructor Office: Moreland 232
Course Description: ENG 106 is a 3 credit course that introduces students to literature, with a particular focus on poetry. In this class, we will read, think about, write about, and discuss a wide variety of poems, and we'll identify and analyze the effects of poetic tools. We'll also consider the historical contexts of some of the poems we read, and we'll look at the ways poetry can reflect and shape culture. All in all, we'll begin to look at poetry through a critical lens. Participation in class discussions and completion of exploratory assignments and guided reading responses make up a significant part of your grade. Quizzes and a final exam allow you to illuminate the understanding you've gained. 
BACC Core Fulfillment: Literature and the Arts
   
Course Name: ENG 107: Introduction to Creative Nonfiction
Section: 1
CRN: 23457
Instructor: St. Germain, Justin
Time: T R 1200-1320
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1330-1500
Instructor Office: 316
Course Description: In this course we will study a broad selection of contemporary creative nonfiction, including personal essays, lyric essays, memoirs, hybrid forms, and nonfiction works in media other than print. We will examine the various ways a diverse genre engages with the real world, and investigate the relationship between narrative and truth, focusing on how a writer's use of craft, context, and source material shapes the reader's understanding.                                                                                                                                                                
BACC Core Fulfillment: Literature and the Arts
   
Course Name: ENG 200: Library Skills for Literary Study
Section: 200
CRN: 20065
Instructor: Nichols, Jane
Time: W 1000-1050
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Instructor Office: 121 Valley Library
Course Description: Course Description:  In this course, we will look at the topic of “library skills” broadly. We will spend time learning how to find and use resources from the OSU Libraries’ collections and will think about various issues related to information. We will look at how information is organized in these (and other) collections – knowledge you can use to unlock any collection of information, in a library, on the web, or in an archive. We will also explore how to learn from and integrate primary sources (materials from Special Collections and Archives) into our research; we will examine the expertise, authority and credibility of those who create the information we use; we will learn about fair use and the rights we have to information we create and consume. We will also consider the social, political and economic aspects of information and knowledge production to better understand today’s information society. 
   
Course Name: ENG 201: Shakespeare
Section: 2
CRN: 26517
Instructor: Olson, Rebecca
Time: M W F 1100-1150
Instructor Office Hours: M W 1000-1050 and by appointment
Instructor Office: 242
Course Description: An introduction to the first half of Shakespeare's dramatic career (the Elizabethan period), with attention to the playwright's continued global influence. This course is designed to help students become confident readers of Shakespeare's language, articulate the significance of aural and visual elements of Shakespearean scripts, and analyze the plays in light of specific cultural and historical contexts, both early modern and contemporary. Plays include Richard III, Romeo and Juliet, The Merchant of Venice, and Hamlet. The course is included in two Baccalaureate Core categories: Western Culture and Literature and the Arts. 
BACC Core Fulfillment: Western Culture,Literature and the Arts
Pre-1800: Pre-1800
   
Course Name: ENG 201: Shakespeare
Section: 1
CRN: 17475
Instructor: Barbour, Richmond
Time: TR 1200-1320
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Instructor Office: 322
Course Description: This course treats a narrative poem and four plays from the first half of Shakespeare's career: the Elizabethan phase.  The primary goal is to sharpen everyone's skills as readers and interpreters of Shakespeare's work and its cultural energies. Our concerns will range from language, characterization, gender, genre, and staging to wider questions of Shakespeare's involvement in the economic, political, theatrical, and popular cultures of his day and ours.  Our sessions will combine lecture and discussion, readings and viewings. Shakespeare's language is challenging--and richly rewarding. To do well in this class, students must keep pace with an ambitious syllabus, engage the concerns of the text, and participate in discussion.
BACC Core Fulfillment: Western Culture,Literature and the Arts
Pre-1800: Pre-1800
   
Course Name: ENG 202H: Shakespeare
Section: 1
CRN: 26788
Instructor: Bude, Tekla
Time: T R 1400-1550
Instructor Office Hours: T 1600-1800
Instructor Office: 320
Course Description: This course is an introduction to the second half of Shakespeare's career, which spanned from roughly 1600 to his death in 1616. We will focus on close-reading Shakespeare's language and analyzing his poetry within its cultural, historical, and literary context, but we will also consider how his plays and poetry are read and made relevant today. How does Shakespeare present issues of genre and form, class and race, nation and empire, gender and sex, material textual history, and authorship?  We will answer these questions through careful reading of five plays written during the second half of Shakespeare's career. Class will include discussion, lecture, readings, and viewings.
BACC Core Fulfillment: Western Culture,Literature and the Arts
Pre-1800: Pre-1800
   
Course Name: ENG 204: Survey of British Literature: Beginnings to 1660
Section: 1
CRN: 17476
Instructor: Bude, Tekla
Time: T R 1000-1120
Instructor Office Hours: T 1600-1800
Instructor Office: 320
Course Description: This course is an introduction to English literature from its beginnings through Chaucer and Shakespeare, and to the early poems of Milton. From Anglo-Saxon riddles and charms to bawdy fabliaux, from travel narratives to sonnets and the rise of professional theater, this course will survey nearly a thousand years of English literary forms in their political, cultural, and artistic contexts, with an eye to understanding how premodern literature and language shaped the course of history. 

In 800 CE, England was merely a loose conglomeration of small kingdoms, a backwater in the North Atlantic fighting to survive against Viking invaders. By 1660, the English Empire was a  growing colonial power internally fragmented by political and religious dissent. What was literature in this early period of English history, and how did its definition, power, and use change over time? What did it mean to read? What did it mean to read in English?
BACC Core Fulfillment: Western Culture,Literature and the Arts
Pre-1800: Pre-1800
   
Course Name: ENG 210: Literatures of the World: Asia
Section: 400
CRN: 25568
Instructor: Fearnside, Jeff
Time: Ecampus
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Instructor Office: Off Campus
Course Description: Utilizing multiple perspectives cultural, geographical, historical, linguistic, political, religious, structural, stylistic, thematic, and other points of views students read, discuss, analyze, and write about representative works of poetry, prose, and drama from Asia, with a special emphasis on the literatures of countries along the historic Silk Road. Texts will be examined in a comparative context and analyses expanded with the help of secondary sources. Involves reading modern and contemporary authors, formal writing assignments involving research, lectures, moderated discussions, and online activities.
BACC Core Fulfillment: Cultural Diversity, Literature and the Arts
   
Course Name: ENG 211: Literature of the World: Africa
Section: 1
CRN: 27588
Instructor: Iyun Osagie
Time: T R 1400-1520
Instructor Office Hours: TBD
Instructor Office: 226
Course Description: This course introduces students to a variety of genres in precolonial, colonial, and postcolonial African Literature: drama, fiction, the short story, the oral tradition, and poetry. Through a close reading of primary texts and an examination of applicable critical works, we will reflect on the economic, social, and political impact of the colonial encounter between Africa and Europe. Western imperialism manifests in what can be called “the colonial condition,” that is, an internal logic and perception of the other in the relationship between the colonizer and the colonized. Our goal is to frame, analytically, African literary output in light of the body of knowledge produced and or circumscribed by the relationship between Africa and the West. No prior knowledge of African Literature is needed.
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Cultural Diversity, Literature and the Arts
   
Course Name: ENG 213: Literatures of the World: The Middle East
Section: 1
CRN: 26520
Instructor: Elbom, Gilad
Time: T R 1000-1120
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1300-1400
Instructor Office: 232
Course Description: This class will focus on modern Middle Eastern literature from multiple perspectives: cultural, political, religious, historical, geographical, linguistic, structural, stylistic, thematic, comparative, and other points of view. The texts on our reading list include a postmodern Palestinian novel, a stream-of-consciousness narrative from Egypt, innovative and controversial poetry in Hebrew, and a surrealistic, hallucinatory, self-deceptive novel from Iran. We will also watch and analyze several Middle Eastern movies. Among the topics we will discuss are different languages and dialects of the Middle East, different national and cultural categories, and the idea that the distinctions between these categories are often fluid and dynamic. We will also try to establish connections between Middle Eastern narratives and global cultural and intellectual ideas.
BACC Core Fulfillment: Cultural Diversity, Literature and the Arts
   
Course Name: ENG 220: Difference, Power, and Discrimination: Sexuality in Film
Section: 1
CRN: 22951
Instructor: Saint Jacques, Jillian
Time: M W F 0900-0950 with film screenings M 1850-2150
Instructor Office Hours: W 1100-1200
Instructor Office: 352
Course Description: In this DPD course, participants concentrate on articulating their own viewpoints concerning the social construction and distribution of difference, power and discrimination in contemporary cinema. By closely analyzing the ways in which an array of films depict sexed characters for a variety of political and libidinal ends. Evaluating the intersection of sex, class, race and age through a variety of genres, nationalities and periods, students learn to closely read films,and to make connections between diverse and even oppositional critical theories, including but not limited to psychoanalytic, feminist, (post)feminist, post-structural and queer theories. This transdisciplinary melange serves as a basis for research, writing, group discussion and personal reflection.
Special Topic: Sexualities in Film
BACC Core Fulfillment: Difference, Power, and Discrimination
   
Course Name: ENG 253: Survey of American Literature: Colonial to 1900
Section: 1
CRN: 22935
Instructor: Betjemann, Peter
Time: M W F 1000-1050
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Instructor Office: 240D
Course Description: Far from just moralizing Puritan sermons or the heady philosophy of writers like Ralph Waldo Emerson, the literature of the early Americas runs the gamut of literary genres, styles, and popularity. This course surveys works ranging across geographies from New Spain (the poetry of Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz) to New England (Bradford’s account of Plymouth Plantation), and across time from fifteenth-century narratives of exploration (Fray Marcos’ diary of his travels in what is now Arizona) to nineteenth-century urban fiction (Herman Melville’s “Bartleby: A Story of Wall Street”). We cover such themes as: the ideological constructions of power and authority in diaries and accounts by European explorers of what was, to them, a “new world”; the relationship between Calvinism and U.S. literary history; the effect of industrialization on writers and their work; and the negotiation of a male-dominated publishing market by such poets as Anne Bradstreet, Phillis Wheatley, and Emily Dickinson.
   
Course Name: ENG 275: The Bible as Literature
Section: 1
CRN: 25152
Instructor: Anderson, Chris
Time: M W F 1000-1050
Instructor Office Hours: M W F 1100-1200
Instructor Office: 324
Course Description: A survey of the major themes, forms, and styles of the Christian Bible, with an emphasis on genre and strategies of narrative.  What is the Bible?  How do the different literary forms of the Bible invite different ways of reading?  How does the language of these stories convey meaning while also requiring interpretation?  How has the  Bible been interpreted in the past?  Who wrote the Bible?  How has the Bible been translated?  How did the books of the Bible become the books of the Bible?  For students of all faiths and varieties of doubt--those without any experience with the Bible, or those with a great deal..  All are welcome, all respected.  And the Bible itself:  examined, explored, and celebrated as in part, whatever else it is, an anthology of important literary texts.  Three midterm exams and frequent in-class writing.
BACC Core Fulfillment: Western Culture,Literature and the Arts
Pre-1800: Pre-1800
   
Course Name: ENG 311: Studies in British Prose
Section: 1
CRN: 26521
Instructor: Davison, Neil
Time: M W F 1400-1450
Instructor Office Hours: M W F 1500-1600
Instructor Office: 230
Course Description: English 311 is an upper division study of the genre of British prose literature with intensive practice in reading and writing skills for literary study. For English Majors, this course is intended as a bridge between 200-level survey and 400-level courses in advanced literary studies. For all students, the amount and type of writing assignments in the course satisfies the OSU WIC requirement. The goal of this course is to give students the opportunity to engage with the cultural, political, and philosophical aspects of British prose through a study of various eras from term to term. In the fall 2017 version, we will study the paired expository and creative prose of a selection of British writers including Walter Pater, Oscar Wilde, James Joyce, and E.M Forster, who together represent key Western cultural questions form the end of the 19th to the first half of the 20th century. 
   
Course Name: ENG 318: The American Novel: Modernist Period
Section: 1
CRN: 26523
Instructor: Sheehan, Elizabeth
Time: T R 1400-1520
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1230-1350
Instructor Office: 234
Course Description: This course explores one of the most dynamic periods in American literary and social history: the early twentieth century. The class focuses on developments in the form of the novel, particularly the flourishing of avant-garde techniques that transformed what novels could say and how. We will study some of the cultural movements and concepts that shaped the era, including the Harlem Renaissance, the "Lost Generation," as well modernism and modernismo. We will also keep in view how formal changes relate to political and cultural phenomena, such as the U.S.'s increasingly global power, immigration and emigration across the Americas, world war, and radical and reformist movements related to civil rights and economic justice. Readings for the course include novels by Gertrude Stein, Claude McKay, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and others!
BACC Core Fulfillment: Literature and the Arts
   
Course Name: ENG 319: The American Novel: Post-World War II
Section: 400
CRN: 24087
Instructor: Elbom, Gilad
Time: Ecampus
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1300-1400
Instructor Office: 232
Course Description: The novels we will read and discuss in this class grapple with the trauma of World War II, the future of America, and the mechanisms of literature itself. In Wise Blood, a young ex-soldier returns from the war to challenge common concepts of sin, faith, sincerity, redemption, personal convictions and commercial enterprise, self-sacrifice and mass deception. A New Life is an academic novel that raises interesting questions about higher education, professional ethics, heroes and antiheroes, humanity and the humanities. His Own Where, a coming-of-age novel written in Black English, calls attention to the fact that domestic sociopolitical struggles may be harder to win or resolve than major international conflicts. How German Is It is a masterpiece of postmodern literature that examines familiar notions in new contexts: history, family, national character, intimate relations, and the very idea of fiction.
BACC Core Fulfillment: Western Culture,Literature and the Arts
   
Course Name: ENG 321: Studies in Word, Object, and Image
Section: 1
CRN: 26524
Instructor: Ward, Megan
Time: M W 1200-1250
Instructor Office Hours: M W 1300-1400
Instructor Office: 302
Course Description: This course examines real and imagined collections and the collectors who like to gather, curate, and/or hoard. We will do this through difference media: first, we will read books of short stories and poems, both for their representations of collecting and as collections themselves. We will also engage with collecting as a material practice by visiting the Linus Pauling collection and the OSU archives and creating and analyzing our own personal collections. Finally, we'll leave the physical realm to explore virtual collections such as Instagram and Tumblr. Over the course of the term, students will write several essays analyzing literature and material culture, as well as complete critical and creative assignments related to archival practices.
Special Topic: Collect Yourself
   
Course Name: ENG 375: Children's Literature
Section: 1
CRN: 27088
Instructor: Ward, Megan
Time: M W F 1500-1550
Instructor Office Hours: M W 1300-1400
Instructor Office: 302
Course Description: The late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries are usually referred to as a golden age of children's literature, meaning that, for the first time, there was a specific body of literature, written and published exclusively for children. Some people, though, think that we are in a second golden age of children's literature, when even adults are turning to children's or young adult (YA) literature to tackle complex contemporary issues such as race, religion, nationalism, and gender. This term, we'll read poetry, fiction, graphic narratives, memoirs, and periodicals from both golden ages in order to examine the kinds of narratives that constitute children's literature, the changing notion of the child, and how children's literature represents modern questions. Assignments include a presentation, short essays, and an open-book final exam.
   
Course Name: ENG 375: Children's Literature
Section: 400
CRN: 26424
Instructor: Braun, Clare
Time: Ecampus
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1300-1400
Instructor Office: 136
Course Description: This course surveys a variety of genres, which may include fairy tales, folktales, fables, nonsense poetry, picture books, historical and fantasy novels, examining how these texts represent childhood and connect with historical, cultural, and psychological contexts.

What counts as children's literature?  Is its purpose to entertain, to socialize, to indoctrinate, or something else?  In this class, we will tackle these questions (and more) as we examine the development of children's literature over time, beginning with the first golden age of the nineteenth century and ending with our current golden age in the twenty-first century.  We will think about how conceptions of childhood have changed over time, shaped by and shaping the literature produced for children. Additionally, we will look at children's literature from the perspective of craft, investigating how literary devices and styles are used by children's authors to influence the child reader in a myriad of ways.
   
Course Name: ENG 435: Studies in Shakespeare
Section: 1
CRN: 26525
Instructor: Olson, Rebecca
Time: M W F 1300-1350
Instructor Office Hours: M W 1000-1050 and by appointment
Instructor Office: 242
Course Description: Although William Shakespeare is one of the most famous writers of all time, we don't actually know what he wrote: he left behind no manuscripts and never authorized the publication of his drama. The plays we know as Hamlet and Romeo and Juliet are essentially the constructs of editors, who compare various and conflicting early printings to present readable versions for modern audiences. In this course students prepare to become editors themselves. How, we will ask, have specific editing decisions led to mainstream interpretations of Shakespearean drama? To what extent do such decisions reflect ideological and cultural biases? Students will engage regularly in hands-on activities, including work with rare books.

This course serves as the prerequisite for Winter term's Editing Romeo and Juliet internship project, in which students will produce a new textbook edition of the play with a new generation of readers in mind. The edition will published online via Open Oregon State.
Special Topic: Editing Shakespeare
Pre-1800: Pre-1800
   
Course Name: FILM 220: Difference, Power, and Discrimination: Sexuality in Film
Section: 1
CRN: 23061
Instructor: Saint Jacques, Jillian
Time: M W F 0900-0950 with film screenings M 1800-2150
Instructor Office Hours: W 1100-1200
Instructor Office: 352
Course Description: In this DPD course, participants concentrate on articulating their own viewpoints concerning the social construction and distribution of difference, power and discrimination in contemporary cinema. By closely analyzing the ways in which an array of films depict sexed characters for a variety of political and libidinal ends. Evaluating the intersection of sex, class, race and age through a variety of genres, nationalities and periods, students learn to closely read films,and to make connections between diverse and even oppositional critical theories, including but not limited to psychoanalytic, feminist, (post)feminist, post-structural and queer theories. This transdisciplinary melange serves as a basis for research, writing, group discussion and personal reflection.
Special Topic: Sexuality in Film
BACC Core Fulfillment: Difference, Power, and Discrimination
   
Course Name: FILM 245: The New American Cinema
Section: 400
CRN: 22736
Instructor: Rust, Stephen
Time: Ecampus
Instructor Office Hours: M W F 1600-1700
Instructor Office: Off campus
Course Description: This online version of Film 245 will attend to post rating-system Hollywood (1968-present) by closely examining the important films and filmmakers of the period along with key events in the business of developing, producing, distributing, and exhibiting motion pictures. There are no prerequisites for the course; however, please keep in mind that this is an ambitious 200-level academic course that requires significant engagement. This is not a film appreciation class.  This course will be delivered via Canvas, where you will interact with your classmates and with your instructor. Within the Canvas site you will access the learning materials, such as the syllabus, class discussions, assignments, projects, and exams.  This course fulfills OSU Baccalaureate Core Perspectives Requirements in Literature and the Arts (L&A) by providing specific forms of content and assessment. 
BACC Core Fulfillment: Literature and the Arts
   
Course Name: FILM 245: The New American Cinema
Section: 245
CRN: 26527
Instructor: Lewis, Jon
Time: T R 1600-1720
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Instructor Office: 312
Course Description: This class will closely examine the important films and filmmakers of post-rating system Hollywood (1968-present). We will focus on the form and style of modern American movies and examine their relationship to contemporary American culture. Of additional interest will be the transitions and transformations in the business of developing, producing, distributing, and exhibiting motion pictures in modern Hollywood.

Screenings include: The Godfather, Taxi Driver, American Graffiti, Jurassic Park, Star Trek, The Silence of the Lambs, Fight Club, Reservoir Dogs, Die Hard, The Matrix, Do the Right Thing, Far from Heaven, Tangerine. 
BACC Core Fulfillment: Literature and the Arts
   
Course Name: FILM 452: Studies in Film
Section: 452
CRN: 25705
Instructor: Zuo, Mila
Time: R 1600-1950/ W (screening) 1800-2050
Instructor Office Hours: R 1400-1550
Instructor Office: 200
Course Description: Genre films (commercial features) are sometimes dismissed for their formulaic storytelling and sensationalistic, bodily appeal. Nevertheless, genre films are the most visible and patronized type of cinema product, as they constitute the majority of global filmmaking practices. In this course, students will develop deeper understandings of the forms, ideologies, and social significance of East Asian (Chinese, Korean, Japanese) popular cinemas, including melodrama, wu xia (martial arts) action, horror, animation, and romantic comedy. We will also view and discuss Asian art films as a point of contrast. Using a transnational framework, we examine the unique developments of genre cinemas in East Asia as well as the ways in which they are repackaged for Western audiences. Students will learn various methodologies for critical analysis in film in addition to ethical and philosophical issues underlying cross-cultural study. How do body genres attempt to "solve cultural problems?"
Special Topic: East Asian Film Genres
   
Course Name: FILM 480: The Sixties: A Cultural History
Section: 1
CRN: 26528
Instructor: Lewis, Jon
Time: T R 1200-1320
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Instructor Office: 312
Course Description: This class offers a multi-media study of the United States during the 1960s, focusing on film and popular music from 1967 and 1968. The class will engage any and all aspects of cultural (that is social and political) history: the Monterey Pop Music Festival, the Democratic Party convention in Chicago, the Vietnam War, and the Mexico City Olympics (at which the Black Power salute became an enduring symbol of the times). Film screenings will range from direct cinema to beach party films, from popular titles like The Graduate and Bonnie and Clyde to the experimental cinema of Andy Warhol. Rare footage and music recordings from the Monterey Pop music festival and the San Francisco summer of love will be studied as well. This course builds upon the OSU/Grammy Museum connection and students will be asked to develop an exhibit for and travel to the Grammy Museum in Los Angeles.
Writing Intensive Course (WIC): Yes
   

Fall Term 2017  Writing Courses

Course Name: WR 121: English Composition
CRN: See Course Catalog
Instructor: Staff
Course Description: WR 121 is designed to help students develop skills and confidence in analytical writing. It also emphasizes rhetorical awareness—the perception of where, how, and why persuasion is occurring. This section offers the unique opportunity for collaboration with the Valley Library’s Special Collections and Archives Research Center. Students will engage directly with materials from the University’s collections in the process of writing a high-quality, researched academic essay. Assignments and in-class activities will emphasize and explore the process of writing, including acts of reading, researching, analytical thinking, freewriting, drafting, review, revision, and editing.
BACC Core Fulfillment: Writing l
   
Course Name: WR 121H: English Composition
Section: 1
CRN: 25468
Instructor: Braun, Clare
Time: T R 0830-0950
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1300-1400
Instructor Office: 136
Course Description: WR 121 is designed to help you develop skills and confidence in analytical writing and to foster your rhetorical awareness and your perception of the where, how, and why of persuasion. We see this course as the beginning of and foundation for your writing development as an undergraduate at OSU and in situations that extend beyond your university studies.
This course places emphasis on the process of writing, including acts of reading, researching, analytical thinking, freewriting, drafting, review, revision, and editing. Complementing this approach is our focus on the final product quality compositions that demonstrate rhetorical awareness and evidence of critical thinking. Writing in WR 121 is approached as both process and product, not only a mode of expression, but also a mode of inquiry and exploration. With practice and a willing, open mind, we're confident that you will leave this course a stronger writer and thinker.
BACC Core Fulfillment: Writing l
   
Course Name: WR 201: Writing for Media
Section: 4
CRN: 21224
Instructor: Strini, Thomas
Time: T R 1600-1720
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1500-1600
Instructor Office: 360
Course Description: An introduction to journalism, including news writing, story structure, interviewing techniques, ethics, copyright and libel. Students alternate in the roles of editors and writers. In my section, I emphasize writing for the internet, including photo selection, cropping and sizing; formatting; basic search engine optimization techniques, which draw readers to online stories; and use of social media to disseminate stories. I publish the best student stories at a public website, The Corvallis Review. The curriculum includes a segment on the history of journalism and related economics and technology.
BACC Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
   
Course Name: WR 201: Writing for Media
Section: 1
CRN: 18669
Instructor: Saint Jacques, Jillian
Time: M W F 1200-1250
Instructor Office Hours: W 1100-1200
Instructor Office: 352
Course Description: Since the popularization of the Internet in the 1980s, we've witnessed a veritable explosion in media culture. We still have traditional media outlets, but the advent of interactive media has also given rise to new forms of journalism; instantaneously breaking “citizen reporting on blogs and podcasts, Twitter feeds and YouTube webcasts. While each of these media forms engage different visual and linguistic styles of representation and appear to conform to different rules, the core skill set in writing for media remains the ability to generate tight, accurate, insightful stories about real-time events at a moment's notice. WR201 students begin the course by learning to formulate headlines, deks and summary leads using the inverted pyramid style. Having gained command of a basic writer's toolbox, participants progress to pitching and generating their own reviews, feature stories and profiles.
BACC Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
   
Course Name: WR 201: Writing for Media
Section: 2
CRN: 18670
Instructor: Saint Jacques, Jillian
Time: M W F 1400-1450
Instructor Office Hours: W 1100-1200
Instructor Office: 352
Course Description: Since the popularization of the Internet in the 1980s, we've witnessed a veritable explosion in media culture. We still have traditional media outlets, but the advent of interactive media has also given rise to new forms of journalism; instantaneously breaking citizen reporting on blogs and podcasts, Twitter feeds and YouTube webcasts. While these media forms engage different visual and linguistic styles of representation and (sometimes) appear to conform to different rules, the core skill set in writing for media remains the ability to generate tight, accurate, insightful stories about real-time events at a moment's notice. WR201 students begin the course by learning to formulate headlines, deks and summary leads using the inverted pyramid style. Having gained command of a basic writer's toolbox, participants progress to pitching and generating their own reviews, feature stories and profiles.
BACC Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
Writing Intensive Course (WIC): Yes
   
Course Name: WR 201: Writing for Media
Section: 400
CRN: 18669
Instructor: Saint Jacques, Jillian
Time: Ecampus
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Instructor Office: Off campus
Course Description: Since the popularization of the Internet in the 1980s, we've witnessed a veritable explosion in media culture. We still have traditional media outlets, but the advent of interactive media has also given rise to new forms of journalism; instantaneously breaking citizen reporting on blogs and podcasts, Twitter feeds and YouTube webcasts. While these media forms engage different visual and linguistic styles of representation and (sometimes) appear to conform to different rules, the core skill set in writing for media remains the ability to generate tight, accurate, insightful stories about real-time events at a moment's notice. WR201 students begin the course by learning to formulate headlines, deks and summary leads using the inverted pyramid style. Having gained command of a basic writer's toolbox, participants progress to pitching and generating their own reviews, feature stories and profiles.
BACC Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
Writing Intensive Course (WIC): Yes
   
Course Name: WR 214: Writing in the Workplace
CRN: See Course Catalog
Instructor: Staff
Course Description: Course Description: Thoughtful and thorough communication across multiple audiences and for multiple purposes continues to be an extremely important skill set in business. Writing in Business helps you build these skills and makes use of different networked technologies, software, and online materials in order to broaden your understanding of where, why, and how writing in the workplace happens. You’ll learn the principles and practices necessary for writing ethical and effective business letters, memos, and reports for a range of professional contexts. WR 214 will also help you present yourself as a professional, research job opportunities, write materials for job applications, and then land the position you want. The work you’ll do in this course is informed by current research in rhetoric and professional writing and is guided by the needs and practices of business, industry, and society at large.
BACC Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
   
Course Name: WR 222: English Composition
CRN: See Course Catalog
Course Description: Argument may seem like a simple word; it’s anything but. One look at the title of your textbook supports that claim. Arguments live in everything we see, think and do. They can be as overt as a Presidential debate and as subtle as a paint color. When you start seeing argumentation in this way, the possibilities are endless. As varied as arguments come, there are tried and true constants in the analysis and crafting of their myriad messages. Arguments are conversations. There is more than one voice in the room. They are grounded in the art of persuasion. They succeed and fail on an understanding of audience. In this course, you will learn the basics of what goes into good argumentative writing through extensive reading, analyzing, brain storming, peer reviewing, revising, debating and (of course) writing. You will develop strategies to help you interpret a variety of texts and compose in a variety of media. This course will show you how a sound argument moves, considering structure, support and form. You will improve your ability to revise your ideas, the reasoning that supports those ideas, and the writing that illustrates them.
BACC Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
   
Course Name: WR 224: Introduction to Fiction Writing
Section: 5
CRN: 22048
Instructor: Griffin, Kristin
Time: T R 1200-1320
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1430-1530 and by appointment
Instructor Office: 354
Course Description: WR 224 is an introduction to the study and practice of fiction writing. This course focuses exclusively on the analysis and composition of short stories. I like to think of the class as having two parts. In Part 1, you will read deeply in the genre and learn the foundations of the craft of fiction writing. In Part 2, you and your peers take the reigns, as each of you will compose your own pieces of short fiction and the majority of what we read and discuss will be your writing. There is no final, but you'll be responsible for creating a final portfolio in which you include your original workshop story, describe your revision process in a cover letter, and present the final version of your short story.
BACC Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
   
Course Name: WR 224: Introduction to Fiction Writing
Section: 400
CRN: 20527
Instructor: Harrison, Wayne
Time: Ecampus
Instructor Office Hours: Online
Instructor Office: 306
Course Description: This online fiction writing workshop examines the basic techniques of fiction, with related writing exercises involving elements such as point of view, theme, characterization, and dialogue. Students will study the work of professional fiction writers and apply the principles of contemporary fiction to their own creative writing, creating and revising a satisfying short story. Assessment methods include creative writing exercises, quizzes and reading checks on textbook craft sections, peer review, and the evolution of a short story from rough draft to a 10 page final draft that meets the structural and thematic qualifications of literature.  
BACC Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
   
Course Name: WR 224: Introduction to Fiction Writing
Section: 401
CRN: 26431
Instructor: Harrison, Wayne
Time: Online
Instructor Office Hours: Online
Instructor Office: 306
Course Description: This online fiction writing workshop examines the basic techniques of fiction, with related writing exercises involving elements such as point of view, theme, characterization, and dialogue. Students will study the work of professional fiction writers and apply the principles of contemporary fiction to their own creative writing, creating and revising a satisfying short story. Assessment methods include creative writing exercises, quizzes and reading checks on textbook craft sections, peer review, and the evolution of a short story from rough draft to a 10 page final draft that meets the structural and thematic qualifications of literature.  
BACC Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
   
Course Name: WR 240: Introduction to Nonfiction Writing
Section: 1
CRN: 24158
Time: M W F 1200-1250
Instructor Office Hours: TBD
Instructor Office: TBD
Course Description: This introductory creative writing course offers an overview of Creative Nonfiction, a genre that includes personal essay, memoir, lyric essay, literary journalism, radio essays, and more. Through a series of short readings and weekly prompts, students will gain experience with many of these forms, learning how to use scene and commentary to best present the stories of their own lives and the lives of others. Because of its emphasis on personal narratives, this Writing II-credit-elligible course is perfect for students looking for a course that fuses creativity and exciting readings with the practical writing skills needed to bring effective storytelling to their statements of purpose, cover letters, and other personally-focused application materials. Students should come to this course prepared to read, discuss, and experiment!
Bacc Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
   
Course Name: WR 241: Intro to Poetry Writing
Section: 2
CRN: 18543
Instructor: David Biespiel
Time: T R 1600-1720
Instructor Office Hours: T R 0730am-0830
Instructor Office: 228
Course Description: A seminar practice for students who are beginning to write poetry or who have no prior workshop experience at Oregon State University. Emphasis is on generating new writing. BACCALAUREATE CORE LEARNING OUTCOMES
Category and Outcomes
Relative to Course Content

Recognize literary and artistic forms/styles, techniques, and the cultural/historical contexts in which they evolve
Recognize poetic modes and means and aesthetic techniques in the context of general examples of poems.
Analyze how literature/the arts reflect, shape, and influence culture
Analyze how the study of poetry informs a reader of the opportunities of the inner life and provides a culture with a necessary civic discussion about the psyche and public life.
Reflect critically on the characteristics and effects of literary and artistic works
Close readings of individual poems based on a sequence of analytic and creative filters.
   
Course Name: WR 241: Intro to Poetry Writing
Section: 4
CRN: 24104
Instructor: David Biespiel
Time: T R 1400-15:20
Instructor Office Hours: T R 0730-0830
Instructor Office: 228
Course Description: A seminar practice for students who are beginning to write poetry or who have no prior workshop experience at Oregon State University. Emphasis is on generating new writing. BACCALAUREATE CORE LEARNING OUTCOMES
Category and Outcomes
Relative to Course Content

Recognize literary and artistic forms/styles, techniques, and the cultural/historical contexts in which they evolve
Recognize poetic modes and means and aesthetic techniques in the context of general examples of poems.
Analyze how literature/the arts reflect, shape, and influence culture
Analyze how the study of poetry informs a reader of the opportunities of the inner life and provides a culture with a necessary civic discussion about the psyche and public life.
Reflect critically on the characteristics and effects of literary and artistic works
Close readings of individual poems based on a sequence of analytic and creative filters.
   
Course Name: WR 241: Introduction to Poetry Writing
Section: 3
CRN: 21942
Instructor: Richter, Jennifer
Time: T R 0830-0950
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1330-1430
Instructor Office: 204D
Course Description: This course is designed to help you sharpen your sensitivity to language and become a skilled reader and writer of poetry.  We will study the basic elements of poetry's imagery, voice, lineation, meter, and so on to further develop our understanding of poetic techniques.
We will work on in-class writing exercises to help coax your initial ideas into finished poems.  In the workshop, we will discuss your own poems in depth.  Our goal in workshopping one another's poems will be to sharpen our own critical faculties, while at the same time providing a useful critical appraisal of the piece in question for its author. We will also read and study a variety of published poems to understand both the nature of contemporary poetry and the literary tradition of which we, as poets, are a part. 
ACC Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
   
Course Name: WR 241: Introduction to Poetry Writing
Section: 400
CRN: 26432
Instructor: Roush, Stephanie
Time: Ecampus
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Instructor Office: 358
Course Description: "A poet is, before anything else, a person who is passionately in love with language” ― W.H. Auden. In this course, we will explore the poetic craft and immerse ourselves in language as both readers and writers. This course will provide a firm grounding in the rudiments of poetic craft such as word choice, line breaks, imagery, and sound, as well as an introduction to different forms available to poets. We will consistently work through writing exercises and read the work of various poets in order to aid us in the generation of our own poems. I hope that you will become genuinely attached to the works/words of a few, if not all, of the poets we engage.
   
Course Name: WR 303: Writing for the Web
Section: 1
CRN: 24299
Instructor: Kelly, Kristy
Time: M W F 1100-1150
Instructor Office Hours: M W 0930-1100
Instructor Office: 208
Course Description: Writing for the Web prepares students to produce instructive, informative, and rhetorically savvy writing for Web-based locations and applications. Web-based writing is often written differently than writing meant for different media, because writing on the Web is more often concerned with helping people find information, get things done, convey their opinions, build communities, and collaborate on complex projects. To this end, Writing for the Web will teach students processes, strategies, and principles for analyzing writing contexts and producing writing for different content management systems, websites, webwares, and apps. This course also a responds to the need for clear, effective, and detail-oriented writing in existing genres and for analysis and production in new and developing platforms. Instruction is grounded in rhetorical theory and by current research in digital rhetoric and technical writing as well as current multimedia writing practices.
BACC Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
   
Course Name: WR 323: English Composition: Writing Bodies in Illness and Health
Section: 1
CRN: 17416
Instructor: Helle, Anita
Time: T R 1000-1120
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1300-1420
Instructor Office: 242
Course Description: Writing Bodies in Medicine and Health meets WR II requirements by: This section of WR 323 fulfills WR II requirements for English Composition. Reading and writing in the course consider written genres and themes relevant to communication in health care professions such as medicine, nursing, public health, and medical humanities.  Students will write essays of definition, analysis, and advocacy on health care issues of personal and public concern.
This section meets WR II requirements by:
- Emphasizing elements of critical thinking
-Focuses on improving skills in essayistic, narrative, and argumentative writing in health care and medicine
- Encourages appreciation and understanding of language, form, and style
-Provides concepts and guidelines for effective written communication within health care
and medical professions
Special Topic: Writing Bodies in Medicine and Health
BACC Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
   
Course Name: WR 323: English Composition
Section: 400
CRN: 21064
Instructor: Katz, Tanya
Time: Ecampus
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Instructor Office: 354
Course Description: Students in WR 323 will be asked to read and respond to the work of others and compose their own texts with a heightened awareness of style, or the way in which language is used to clearly and gracefully articulate one’s own worldview. We will focus on creative nonfiction, reading and responding to several essays by published authors. We will study these essays with an eye toward techniques to borrow, discussing the writer's choices with regard to elements of craft (point of view, structure, characterization, voice, etc.). Students will write several short, weekly exercises and one long essay, and also revise the long essay. Students’ long essays will also be discussed in workshop format.
   
Course Name: WR 324: Short Story Writing
Section: 400
CRN: 20805
Instructor: Brock, Isabelle
Time: Ecampus
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Instructor Office: 232
Course Description: This section of Short Story Writing focuses on flash fiction, the very short story. We will read a wide range of flash fictions, and we'll discuss what might make a piece of flash fiction successful. We'll evaluate the snap-shot feel of a 1000 (or fewer!) word story, and we'll identify and question elements of traditional stories.

Students will write a minimum of three flash fictions, and submit them for student and instructor feedback in a workshop discussion board. Students will also read and discuss numerous flash fictions and be exposed to a wide variety of resources for creative writers online. This course makes use of open-source materials; no textbook is required.

This course is fully online, and uses Canvas, our online learning platform. In our online learning community, you will access learning materials, complete and submit assignments, and interact with your classmates and with the instructor through the discussion board.
BACC Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
   
Course Name: WR 327: Technical Writing
CRN: See Course Catalog
Course Description: Course Description: WR 327 will prepare you to produce instructive, informational, and persuasive documents aimed at well-defined and achievable outcomes. Technical documents are precise, concise, and organized, but often based on complex information. However, the purpose and target audience of each document often determines how that information is presented, including writing style, document layout, vocabulary, sentence and paragraph structure, and visuals, among other factors. To this end, this course teaches processes for analyzing writing contexts and producing effective, clean, and reader-centered documents in an efficient manner. Grounded in rhetorical theory, WR 327 presents contemporary research in technical communication and instructs students in current best practices. Individually and in groups, students learn effective strategies for communicating with technology in the modern, networked workplace.
BACC Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
   
Course Name: WR 327: Technical Writing in Engineering
Section: 1
CRN: 17418
Instructor: Elbom, Emily
Time: M W F 1400-1450
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Instructor Office: 358
Course Description: In the “Technical Writing for Engineers” sections of WR 327, students use an engineering communication textbook and engage with the course objectives and learning outcomes through engineering-specific activities and assignments. This approach serves two purposes. First, by focusing specifically on principles of effective engineering communication, the course builds proficiency in the kinds of communication practices you will be tasked with both in pro-school and in the engineering workplace. Second, your engagement with fundamental engineering concepts in each of the course assignments will both solidify and extend your repertoire of technical knowledge. In other words, participation in this course not only will help you become a better engineering communicator but will also lead to greater conceptual and technical fluency in your chosen field.
BACC Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
   
Course Name: WR 327: Technical Writing in Engineering
Section: 2
CRN: 18879
Instructor: Elbom, Emily
Time: M W F 1300-1350
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Instructor Office: 358
Course Description: In the “Technical Writing for Engineers” sections of WR 327, students use an engineering communication textbook and engage with the course objectives and learning outcomes through engineering-specific activities and assignments. This approach serves two purposes. First, by focusing specifically on principles of effective engineering communication, the course builds proficiency in the kinds of communication practices you will be tasked with both in pro-school and in the engineering workplace. Second, your engagement with fundamental engineering concepts in each of the course assignments will both solidify and extend your repertoire of technical knowledge. In other words, participation in this course not only will help you become a better engineering communicator but will also lead to greater conceptual and technical fluency in your chosen field.
BACC Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
   
Course Name: WR 330: Understanding Grammar
Section: 400
CRN: 19910
Instructor: Brock, Isabelle
Time: Ecampus
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Instructor Office: 232
Course Description: WR 330 is an advanced study of traditional grammatical forms and conventional grammatical terms with emphasis on the assumptions underlying the structure of traditional grammar. As a 300-level course, this class will require significant student practice, discussion, and evaluation. In this course, we will study the sentence, its structure, and all the possible ways to create one. We'll gain the vocabulary to discuss language; we'll read and demonstrate comprehension of relevant theory, concepts, and techniques for understanding grammatically correct communication; and we'll develop appreciation of language, form, and style.

You will learn through reading assignments, homework completion, class discussions, various guided activities, discourse analysis projects, and weekly quizzes. Completing all assignments will be essential for your success in this course.
BACC Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
   
Course Name: WR 340: Creative Nonfiction Writing
Section: 1
CRN: 26533
Instructor: Passarello, Elena
Time: T R 1400-1520
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1530-1630
Instructor Office: 342
Course Description: This intermediate-level creative writing class focuses on nonfiction: personal essays, memoirs, and graphic/ multi-media pieces. OSU students who have completed 200-level coursework in writing fiction, poetry, or nonfiction are welcome to enroll. Over the ten weeks of the course we will read, discuss, and practice the crucial aspects of vibrant contemporary creative nonfiction writing. Students will draft three pieces, each responding to a specific nonfiction sub-genre. We will also read several published essays by living authors, paying special attention to the nonfiction writers scheduled to visit our campus in the 2017-2018 academic year. Expect at least one formal, MFA-style workshop at some point in the term.
   
Course Name: WR 341: Poetry Writing
Section: 1
CRN: 23461
Instructor: David Biespiel
Time: T R 0830-0950
Instructor Office Hours: T R 0730-0830
Instructor Office: 228
Course Description: A seminar practice for students who are beginning to write poetry or who have taken WR 241  at Oregon State University. Emphasis is on generating new writing, reading deeply in new poetry, and developing workshop and revision prowess.
Recognize literary and artistic forms/styles, techniques, and the cultural/historical contexts in which they evolve. Recognize poetic modes and means and aesthetic techniques in the context of general examples of poems. Analyze how literature/the arts reflect, shape, and influence culture. Analyze how the study of poetry informs a reader of the opportunities of the inner life and provides a culture with a necessary civic discussion about the psyche and public life. Reflect critically on the characteristics and effects of literary and artistic works. Close readings of individual poems based on a sequence of analytic and creative filters.
   
Course Name: WR 362: Science Writing
Section: 1
CRN: 27118
Instructor: Pflugfelder, Ehren
Time: M W F 1200-1250
Instructor Office Hours: M W F 1100-1200
Instructor Office: 212
Course Description: In WR 362, Science Writing, we'll study the practice and conventions for writing about science to a broader public of non-professionals. We'll read and analyze some of the best and most influential science journalism from the past few years and see what makes that writing successful, before we write our own news pieces and feature articles, paying attention to both print and digital outlets for that work. While the course addresses some of the more practical skills involved in writing about complex scientific information, we'll also learn about models of narrative that support that work. The reading and writing assignments have been designed to help students gain greater insight into the issues and challenges of science writing in a variety of contexts.
BACC Core Fulfillment: Writing ll
   
Course Name: WR 407: Screenwriting
Section: 1
CRN: 27371
Instructor: David Turkel
Time: M W F 1000-1050
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Instructor Office: TBA
Course Description: WR 407 teaches the skills necessary for developing a story premise into a full-length screenplay. Over ten weeks, students will pitch and troubleshoot script ideas, develop film treatments and “beat-sheets,” and ultimately write and workshop the professionally formatted first act of their fully outlined, three-act screenplay. Particular attention will be paid to dissecting story structure and learning clear, energetic strategies for developing character and action through scene. We will engage in the “prescriptive” workshop setting that is relatively unique to the screenwriting profession. Throughout the course, we’ll examine--in both filmed and written forms--techniques of master practitioners as we attempt to understand the elements that must unite to craft a screenplay's tight opening act.
Is this a writing intensive (WIC) course? Yes
   
Course Name: WR 424: Advanced Fiction Writing
Section: 1
CRN: 24107
Instructor: Scribner, Keith
Time: T R 1600-1720
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Instructor Office: 308
Course Description: In this course we will read and write fiction.  Using published stories as models, we'll discuss methods of characterization, plotting, scene-setting, dialogue, and so on.  Much of our work together will involve close reading and analysis of the texts in question.  Our emphasis will be on writing more complicated and sophisticated stories with concision and economy.
We are writers in this class, and we'll be reading as writers.  We will ask, over and over, three questions:
-what is the effect of a sentence, paragraph, word, or image?
-what techniques produce these effects?
-of these techniques, which might we borrow, steal, or avoid?
Genre fiction, such as sci fi, romance, mystery, fantasy, young adult—will not be considered in this class.
Prerequisites: WR 324 and WR 224
   
Course Name: WR 448: Magazine Article Writing
Section: 1
CRN: 27091
Instructor: Griffin, Kristin
Time: T R 1000-1120
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1430-1530 and by appointment
Instructor Office: 354
Course Description: This course will guide you through the process of querying, writing, and selling your first magazine article. Reading deeply in the genre, both in print and online, you'll develop an understanding of the marketplace and learn strategies for building a freelance writing practice. This includes considerations of what makes for a good magazine article, discussions about recognizing and cultivating expertise, and exercises intended to hone your unique voice. You'll be introduced to valuable resources, will have the opportunity to chat with active editors, and will share your work with peers during in-class workshops. Expect a practical nuts and bolts class, one that leaves you a stronger and more confident writer.
   
Course Name: WR 449: Critical Reviewing
Section: 400
CRN: 23453
Instructor: Jameson, Sara
Time: Ecampus
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Instructor Office: Off campus
Course Description: WR 449 Critical Reviewing, focuses on popular reviews and critiques of the arts, including performing arts, visual arts, film & television, and literary arts for newspapers and magazines, in print and online.  From a foundation of research and case study analyses, students will then write their own reviews in a style to fit a specific publication. In this Ecampus course, in addition to reading, students will attend events on their own for the DIY Do-It-Yourself Field Trips and then write about them. This course prepares students for review freelancing.
This upper-level writing course counts toward the Writing Minor, and as such, involves a lot of writing, even though it is not a designated WIC course.