Food is more than simple nourishment. It is part of a system of communication firmly rooted in individual and group identities within cultures around the world. When and how we eat, what is considered acceptable to eat, how we prepare it, and how we learn about producing and eating food are all fascinating questions to explore by humanists and social scientists. Histories of particular food commodities and changes in the way people think about sustaining healthy bodies richly contextualizes our present practices. Cultural analyses of food and food production lead us to question the level of social justice within the local and global food systems. Community food security is a condition in which all community residents obtain a safe, culturally acceptable, nutritionally adequate diet through a sustainable food system that maximizes community self-reliance and social justice. Students who complete this certificate will not only have a clear idea of the cultural bases of food and food production, but will obtain some experience working towards community food security.