Schedule of Classes: English

Schedule of Classes: Film

Schedule of Classes: Writing

Course Descriptions Spring 2018

Winter 2018

Spring 2018

Winter 2018

Spring 2018

Winter 2018

Spring 2018

ENG
FILM
WR

Course Name: ENG 540: Studies in Modern Irish Literature: Postcolonial Joyce

Section: 1

CRN: 59249

Instructor Name: Davison, Neil

Class Meeting Times: TR 1200-1320

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1400-1700

Instructor Office Number Moreland: 230

Course Description: Through a study of James Joyce’s work, this class will explore how, alongside its Modernist formalism, the 20th century Anglophone novel frequently became a battleground over empire and its interpellations of race, class, and gender. As Postcolonial studies confronts how the decolonized West is symbiotic to Post-Holocaust revisions of race, Ulysses’ focus on the Irish late-colonial struggle as mediated through the otherness of a pre-Holocaust Jewish character gains new relevance. We’ll frame our study of Joyce through modern Irish history, biography, and selections from Hannah Arendt’s Origins of Totalitarianism. Our study of Joyce’s fiction will also engage his formalism, but students are expected to have prior knowledge of movements such as Naturalism, Impressionism, Symbolism, Expressionism, or narrative modes such as free-and-indirect or stream-of-consciousness. Aside from grasping the above political questions, another goal of the course is to conduct a thorough study of Ulysses during the second half of the term. A 20-page essay focusing on the historical/colonial/postcolonial Ulysses will be the sole method of student evaluation in the course.

Special Topic: Postcolonial Studies and Irish History

Requirement Fulfilled: MA Experience

 

Course Name: ENG 460/560: Classical Greek Drama

Section: 1

CRN: 59248

Instructor Name: Barbour, Richmond

Class Meeting Times: MWF 1300-1350

Instructor Office Hours: 1100-1130 and 1530-1600

Instructor Office Number Moreland: Office

Course Description: The course examines tragedy and comedy in ancient Athens, where these arts forms originated. Studying powerful dramas vital to the body politic in their own day and crucial to literary and theatrical history ever since, we will read them as both literary texts and theatrical shows. We will examine the myths that imparted action and imagery to the plays, the festivals where they were staged, and the historical pressures that shaped the visions of dramatists and spectators. We will also explore the meaning and impact of classical drama for audiences today. Course requirements include oral presentations, a critical essay, a research paper, and a final exam.

Special Topic: Classical Greek Drama

 

Course Name: ENG 575: Studies in Criticism

Section: 1

CRN: 58087

Instructor Name: Sheehan, Elizabeth

Class Meeting Times: F 1400-1750

Instructor Office Hours: MW 1200-1330

Instructor Office Number Moreland: 234

Course Description: This course introduces graduate students to current methods and modes of feminist textual analysis with a focus on application. It explores feminist approaches to key topics and terms within literary and cultural studies (including form, aesthetics, agency, affect, and subjectivity) as well as methodologies used or developed by feminist critics, such as ideology critique, historicist analysis, and phenomenological or reader-response approaches to texts. Much of the scholarship we read can be situated within the capacious field of affect studies, and we will explore how different methodologies emerge from and function within that field. Since a central goal of class is to prepare students to apply these ideas and methodologies in their own work, we will practice using them to analyze a range of cultural phenomena in different genres and medium, including short stories, novels, poems, photographs, films, and blog posts.

Special Topic: Feminist Textual Analysis

Requirement Fulfilled: MA Experience

 

Course Name: ENG 585: Studies in American Literature

Section: 1

CRN: 59250

Instructor Name: Rodgers, Susan

Class Meeting Times: TR 1000-1120

Instructor Office Hours: T 1330-1500 / R 1000-1100

Instructor Office Number Moreland: 344

Course Description: Linked stories, interconnected stories, short story cycle, novel-in-stories—these are works in which the stories intersect, overlap, or connect in some significant way. Collections can be organized around setting (Sherwood Anderson's Winesburg, Ohio), community (Gloria Naylor's Women of Brewster Place), family (Richard McCann's Our Mother of Sorrows), character (Evan S. Connell's Mrs. Bridge), a singular event, or set of events (Joan Silber's Improvement), or even a variation on a theme (Joan Wickersham's The News from Spain: Seven Variations on a Love Story). The key is that “the stories are both self-sufficient and interrelated. On the one hand, the stories work independently of one another: the reader is capable of understanding each of them without going beyond the limits of the individual story. On the other hand. . . the ability of the story cycle to extend discussions—to work on a larger scale—resembles what is accomplished in the novel” (Susan Garland Mann, The Short Story Cycle). This is a craft class, so we will be examining each work from a writer’s perspective, and use our findings to inform our own creative work. We’ll also discuss how to determine whether material is best suited for a novel or a linked collection. While our focus is on fiction, writers of all genres are welcome. Requirements include regular written responses to the readings, creative exercises, an oral presentation, and a final project/paper, which may be either critical or creative in nature.

Special Topic: The Linked Story Collection

Requirement Fulfilled: Craft

 

Course Name: ENG 488/588: Literature and Pedagogy

Section: 1

CRN: 57508

Instructor Name: Helle, Anita

Class Meeting Times: TR 1600-1720

Instructor Office Hours: MW 1445-1550

Instructor Office Number Moreland: 224

Course Description: Literature and Pedagogy is designed for students who may be interested in teaching college or secondary English classes in reading and literature (or literature and cultural studies) in 21st century classrooms. The course focuses on reading as a “transaction” between the flesh-and-blood reader, the writer, the text, and the social contexts—classrooms, communities, and youth cultures--in which reading of literature takes place. Points of emphasis may change from term to term, but topics typically include the disposition of readers in the classroom, cultural and critical pedagogies, histories and traditions of “professing literature,” and special issues associated with the teaching of genres and/or media. Assignments include in-class workshops on pedagogical practice, literacy narrative on histories of reading, and a final project shaping a course of study or researching a major figure in the history of literature and culture pedagogies. Connections between reading and writing, lit and comp, are part of the course. Be prepared to be part of a community of readers, scholars, and teachers at the secondary and college levels.

 

Course Name: FILM 580: Studies in Film, Culture and Society: Postsocialist Cinema

Section: 2

CRN: 59253

Instructor Name: Nagypal, Tamas

Class Meeting Times: MW 1400-1520 / M 1800-2150

Instructor Office Hours: M 1000-1200

Instructor Office Number Moreland: Autzen House 203

Course Description:Through the lens of transnational film analysis, the course examines the fundamental sociocultural transformation that countries of Eastern Europe, the Balkans, and East Asia underwent after abandoning their state socialist political systems for neoliberal capitalism. While the nature of this shift ranged from gradual reform (China), through relatively bloodless revolution (Eastern Europe), to civil war (the Balkans), its outcome (rising inequality and insecurity, loss of human rights, return of nationalism and ethnicism) is comparable across different regions. We will therefore consider how the unique aesthetics, narrative themes, and genre formulas of postsocialist cinemas address their local as well as trans-local history of the transition process, its winners and losers, its impact on race, class, and gender relations, and its political and economic role in the expansion of global capitalism after the Cold War. Topics include: the Polish gangster film, the cinema of the Balkans war, postsocialist nostalgia, the Romanian New Wave, film noirs and documentaries of Sixth Generation Chinese filmmakers, and nationalist blockbusters from Russia.

Special Topic: Postsocialist Cinema

 

Course Name: WR 420/520: Studies in Writing; Style and the Sentence

Section: 1

CRN: 55016

Instructor Name: Anderson, Chris

Class Meeting Times: MWF 0900-0950

Instructor Office Hours: MWF 1000-1050

Instructor Office Number Moreland: 324

Course Description: A course in the writing of sentences, and the enjoying of sentences, and the analyzing of sentences. For creative writers, academic writers, all writers. Will only be writing sentences, hundreds of them. Nothing beyond the level of the sentence. An exercise class in a way: every day in class we'll be doing things with sentences, even diagramming them. Imitating them. Content won't matter. Originality won't matter. Just sentences, all over the place. You'll keep a notebook and keep track of everything there. Also, some reading in the theory of the sentence, in rhetoric and comp studies. The idea: to give you tools for making your sentences clearer, sharper, and more direct, whatever kind of writing you do. So mastery. But also: mystery. A sense of the mystery and beauty of the sentences we write and the sentences we read and the sentences we hear. Texts: Joseph Williams, STYLE; Moutoux, DRAWING SENTENCES.

Special Topic: Style and the Sentence

 

Course Name: WR 522: Teaching Practicum: Poetry Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 58119

Instructor Name: Richter, Jennifer

Class Meeting Times: T 1730-1820

Instructor Office Hours: T 1100-1300

Instructor Office Number Moreland: 204D

Course Description: WR522 is the Poetry Teaching Practicum for graduate students who have been accepted into Oregon State University’s Master of Fine Arts program in Creative Writing. During the term, students will prepare all the teaching materials necessary to teach WR241: Introduction to Poetry Writing: syllabi, reading packets, poetry assignment guideline sheets, and poetry prompts/exercises. Students will review a number of anthologies and optional craft books and choose what they’ll use in the classroom. Students will discuss and develop strategies for workshopping, commenting on student work, teaching prosody/scanning, teaching close-reading skills, and assessing individual assignments as well as final course grades. Near the end of the term, students will also be asked to write a statement of teaching philosophy for the teaching of poetry writing. This class is offered every spring, and must be taken by any poetry MFA student who wants to teach poetry writing in their second year.
 

Course Name: WR 540: Advanced Nonfiction Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 55017

Instructor Name: Estreich, George

Class Meeting Times: T 1800-2050

Instructor Office Hours: T 1700-1800

Instructor Office Number Moreland: 360

Course Description: Our class is primarily a workshop, but we will also discuss published essays. The class has two main goals: giving you specific, practical help with your own writing projects, and providing a space in which to develop your ideas about literary nonfiction. Requirements include two workshop submissions, weekly workshop letters, readings from the anthology, and a brief essay on some aspect of craft. I’ll also do brief lectures from time to time. We’ll be using the anthology The Best American Essays of the Century, ed. Joyce Carol Oates; other readings will be available on Canvas or distributed in class.

 

Course Name: WR 540: Advanced Nonfiction Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 55017

Instructor Name: Estreich, George

Class Meeting Times: T 1800-2050

Instructor Office Hours: T 1700-1800

Instructor Office Number Moreland: 360

Course Description: Our class is primarily a workshop, but we will also discuss published essays. The class has two main goals: giving you specific, practical help with your own writing projects, and providing a space in which to develop your ideas about literary nonfiction. Requirements include two workshop submissions, weekly workshop letters, readings from the anthology, and a brief essay on some aspect of craft. I’ll also do brief lectures from time to time. We’ll be using the anthology The Best American Essays of the Century, ed. Joyce Carol Oates; other readings will be available on Canvas or distributed in class.

 

Course Name: WR 541: Advanced Poetry Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 37410

Instructor Name: Richter, Jennifer

Class Meeting Times: T 1400-1650

Instructor Office Hours: T 1100-1300

Instructor Office Number Moreland: 204D

Course Description: WR 541 is the MFA graduate poetry workshop: a course focused on rigorous discussions of both student work and published collections. During the term, we’ll read three books of contemporary poetry—including at least one first book—which are linked by a common theme, voice, or structure; we’ll study these as models and inspiration for what’s possible in your thesis and subsequent collections. To encourage you to see yourselves in a larger literary context and understand how your work is already in a kind of collaborative dialogue with contemporary published poets, you’ll have the valuable opportunity to talk with one of the featured poets (in person or via Skype) and ask about his/her work, process, and route to publication. In terms of requirements, you’ll offer an oral presentation on one of the books we’re studying, and at the end of the term you’ll turn in a final portfolio of four revised poems. Please note: enrollment in this course is limited to graduate students who have been accepted into Oregon State University's Master of Fine Arts program in Creative Writing.
 

Course Name: WR 545: Studies in Nonfiction

Section: 1

CRN: 56506

Instructor Name: Passarello, Elena

Class Meeting Times: W 1300-1550

Instructor Office Hours: T 1400-1600

Instructor Office Number Moreland: 342

Course Description: This craft course is designed to help MFA fiction and nonfiction students explore three professional tasks: 1) submitting work to literary magazines, agents, and contests; 2) working through revisions both alone and with a professional editor; and 3) presenting work aloud at public readings. Over the course of the term, we will Skype with editors, judges, readings series curators, and other members of the contemporary prose industry. We will develop a working knowledge of the publishing habits and submissions policies of several prominent literary magazines through research, interview, and discussion of signature texts. Students will chart (and possibly attempt) writing other types of literary magazine pieces (often called "front of the book" or "specials") and develop submission plans for their own work. The group will also work as editors for one another through the careful revision of at least one short piece on the aforementioned submission plan. Finally, in the last third of the term, students will practice reading their submission piece for a public setting, honing both our technical skills as public readers and behind-the-scenes skills as translators of our own work into viable performance material. [NOTE: before the course begins, registered students will have the chance to express what specific issues within those three categories they have, and the course design will respond to those survey results accordingly. For that reason, certain (small) aspects of this description are subject to change.]

Special Topic: Prose Lab: Revision, Submission, Presentation

Requirement Fulfilled: Craft

 

Course Name: WR 593: The Rhetorical Tradition and Teaching of Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 59259

Instructor Name: Tolar Burton, Vicki

Class Meeting Times: TR 1400-1520

Instructor Office Hours: Office Hours

Instructor Office Number Moreland: Office

Course Description: This MA Experience course focuses on major classical theories of rhetoric and written communication, their historical context, and their impact on writing and the teaching of writing. Students will complete substantial reading assignments of primary texts in the rhetorical tradition, including those by such major figures in the history of rhetoric as Aspasia, Gorgias, Isocrates, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, and Quintilian. Students will conduct research in classical rhetoric and use writing as a mode of learning through journal entries, blogging, essay writing, in-class writing, and other assignments. Students will also have frequent opportunities for seminar leadership and presentation. As seminar participants, all students are expected to contribute to class discussion. This course fulfills these Graduate Requirements: Pedagogy; Pre-1800; MA Experience. Required for graduate students in Rhetoric, Writing, and Culture.

Requirement Fulfilled: MA Experience, Pedagogy

 

Course Name: WR 599: Composition Pedagogies for MFAs

Section: 3

CRN: 59260

Instructor Name: Kelly, Kristy

Class Meeting Times: TR 1200-1320

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1000-1200

Instructor Office Number Moreland: 208

Course Description: In WR 599: Composition Pedagogies, we’ll study current composition pedagogies and the assumptions that are built into different methods of teaching writing. This course is designed for MFA students who want to know more about the many ways that composition is taught for different populations of students in various locations. Students will learn about both dominant and emergent methods for teaching writing, including approaches that focus on basic writing, cultural studies, genres, new media, online courses and more. We’ll envision the bigger picture of writing pedagogy and determine what the “threshold concepts” are for teaching writing to college students. We’ll also look at composition and writing studies as a discipline, strategizing about professionalization and best practices for entering job markets. This class will enrich your approaches to teaching and evaluating your students’ writing, building materials for future courses, and adapting your MFA expertise to the diverse array of composition students’ needs.

Special Topic: Composition Pedagogies for MFAs

Requirement Fulfilled: Pedagogy

 

Course Name: WR 599: Scientific and Technical Research Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 57518

Instructor Name: Pflugfelder, Ehren

Class Meeting Times: TR 1000-1120

Instructor Office Hours: TR 1130-1230

Instructor Office Number Moreland: 212

Course Description: Scientific and Technical Research Writing is for graduate students who are looking to practice writing and communicating about their research and learn more about how writing is accomplished in their field of study. Students do not need to come into the course with a data set and can be at any place in their graduate program. We’ll analyze how writing is done by experts in your field, find out what to expect from your thesis or dissertation project, and write an article that can reach a much wider public. Perhaps most importantly, students can also choose a writing project they want to work on and get one-on-one assistance on that project from writing faculty.

Special Topic: Scientific and Technical Research Writing