Schedule of Classes: English

Schedule of Classes: Film

Schedule of Classes: Writing

Course Descriptions Fall 2017

Winter 2017

Spring 2017

Fall 2017

Winter 2017

Spring 2017

Fall 2017

Winter 2017

Spring 2017

Fall 2017

ENG
FILM

WR

Course Name: ENG 435/535: Studies in Shakespeare
Section: 1
CRN: 26526
Instructor Name: Olson, Rebecca
Time: M W F 1300-1350
Instructor Office Hours: M W 1000-1050 and by appointment
Office Location: 242
Course Description: Although William Shakespeare is one of the most famous writers of all time, we don't actually know what he wrote: he left behind no manuscripts and never authorized the publication of his drama. The plays we know as Hamlet and Romeo and Juliet are essentially the constructs of editors, who compare various and conflicting early printings to present readable versions for modern audiences. In this course students prepare to become editors themselves. How, we will ask, have specific editing decisions led to mainstream interpretations of Shakespearean drama? To what extent do such decisions reflect ideological and cultural biases? Students will engage regularly in hands-on activities, including work with rare books.

This course serves as the prerequisite for Winter terms "Editing Romeo and Juliet" internship project, in which students will produce a new textbook edition of the play with a new generation of readers in mind. The edition will be published online via Open Oregon State.
Special Topics:  Editing Shakespeare
Requirements Fulfilled: Pre-1800
   
Course Name: ENG 514: Introduction to Graduate Studies
Section: 1
CRN: 21699
Instructor Name: Malewitz, Raymond
Time: T R 1600-1720
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1400-1500
Office Location: 340
Course Description: In addition to explaining the requirements, procedures, and trajectory of the MA program, this class offers a rapid introduction to the theories, methods, and professional practices of academics working in the fields of literature, film, rhetoric, and composition. Throughout the course, we will examine a series of prominent critical approaches that have guided advanced study in the program's three MA fields: (1) literature and culture; (2) rhetoric, writing, and culture; and (3) film and visual studies. We will learn (or re-learn) these approaches by using our theory readings as critical lenses for the exploration of (a) a series of small textual and filmic artifacts and (b) a series of essential issues (including contemporary discussions of affect, biopolitics, neoliberalism, race, gender, and sexuality).
   
Course Name: ENG 534: Studies in Romanticism
Section: 1
CRN: 25160
Instructor Name: Gottlieb, Evan
Time: M W F 0900-0950
Instructor Office Hours: M W F 1000-1050
Office Location: 362
Course Description:

This seminar will investigate changing meanings and deployments of the concept of world and worldliness in Romantic-era British literature. These will include, at a minimum, the imaginative world-building of Blake's mytho-poetic corpus; negotiations of the world of commercial modernity in Wordsworth's poetry; the far reaches of natural science in Mary Shelley's fiction; the alternative (virtual?) worlds of Percy Shelley's poetry; and the discipline-founding subject of Charles Lyell's ground-breaking (pun intended!) Principles of Geology (1830-33). By reading Romantic-era poetry, fiction, philosophy, natural science, and political economy, as well as some contemporary theory, we will see not only how the Romantics understood and deployed "worlds" and engaged in "worldliness," but also how their legacies continue to influence contemporary frameworks and genres for conceptualizing our globalized, networked, increasingly precarious world.

Special Topics:  Romantic Worlds/ Worldly Romanticism
Requirements Fulfilled: Pre-1800
   
Course Name: ENG 545: Studies in Nonfiction
Section: 1
CRN: 25164
Instructor Name: St. Germain, Justin
Time: W 1700-1950
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1330-1500
Office Location: 316
Course Description: This graduate craft course will focus on the physical, psychological, and symbolic space of borders, with an emphasis on the borderlands between the United States and Mexico. We will examine how a diverse range of nonfiction authors represent the border in terms of craft. The final reading list is TBD. Assignments will include a presentation of one of the course texts, including an artistic rendering of a border space, as well as a written final project with critical and creative components.                                                                                                         
Requirements Fulfilled: Craft
   
Course Name: ENG 570: Studies in Poetry: Hybrid Forms
Section: 1
CRN: 21841
Instructor Name: Richter, Jennifer
Time: T R 1200-1320
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1330-1430
Office Location: 204D
Course Description: In this craft class, we will study contemporary writers who have roots in poetry but who've launched from lineation into inventive new formal territory.  Without the framework of line and stanza, how are a poet's obsessions expressed?  In-depth discussions and extensive in- and out-of-class writing assignments will ask you to consider how your own poetry changes when given the chance to push the boundaries of the page. Each collection we consider will redefine what's possible for us as writers, and for the book as art and artifact. The reading list will include Sarah Manguso, Matthea Harvey, and Gary Young.
Special Topics:  Hybrid Forms
Requirements Fulfilled: Craft
   
Course Name: FILM 452/552: Studies in Film
Section: 1
CRN: 24099
Instructor Name: Zuo, Mila
Time: R 1600-1950/ W (screening) 1800-2050
Instructor Office Hours: R 1400-1550
Office Location: 200
Course Description: Genre films (commercial features) are sometimes dismissed for their formulaic storytelling and sensationalistic, bodily appeal. Nevertheless, genre films are the most visible and patronized type of cinema product, as they constitute the majority of global filmmaking practices. In this course, students will develop deeper understandings of the forms, ideologies, and social significance of East Asian (Chinese, Korean, Japanese) popular cinemas, including melodrama, sci-fi, wu xia (martial arts) action, horror, animation, and romantic comedy. We will also view and discuss Asian art films as a point of contrast. Using a transnational framework, we examine the unique developments of genre cinemas in East Asia as well as the ways in which they are repackaged for Western audiences. Students will learn various methodologies for critical analysis in film in addition to ethical and philosophical issues underlying cross-cultural study. How do body genres attempt to "solve cultural problems?"
Special Topics:  East Asian Film Genres
   
Course Name: FILM 480/580: The Sixties: A Cultural History
Section: 1
CRN: 26529
Instructor Name: Lewis, Jon
Time: TR 12:00-13:20
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Office Location: 312
Course Description: This class offers a multi-media study of the United States during the 1960s, focusing on film and popular music from 1967 and 1968. The class will engage any and all aspects of cultural (that is social and political) history: the Monterey Pop Music Festival, the Democratic Party convention in Chicago, the Vietnam War, and the Mexico City Olympics (at which the Black Power salute became an enduring symbol of the times). Film screenings will range from direct cinema to beach party films, from popular titles like The Graduate and Bonnie and Clyde to the experimental cinema of Andy Warhol. Rare footage and music recordings from the Monterey Pop music festival and the San Francisco summer of love will be studied as well. This course builds upon the OSU/Grammy Museum connection and students will be asked to develop an exhibit for and travel to the Grammy Museum in Los Angeles.
Requirements Fulfilled: MA Experience
   
Course Name: WR 517: Teaching Practicum
Section: 1
CRN: 17435
Instructor Name: Jensen, Tim
Time: T 1730-1920
Instructor Office Hours: M 1000-1200 / T 1330-1530
Office Location: 204B 
Course Description: This seminar continues GTA training in and preparation for WR 121 instruction, further exploring the pedagogical practices and principles introduced during orientation.  Whereas orientation serves as an overview of the curriculum, its objectives, assignment sequence, and theoretical trajectory, this course is designed to provide GTAs with more practice in and support for the nitty-gritty of actually teaching WR121 from week to week. The course provides an opportunity for GTAs to discover and devise teaching skills, share strategies, and participate in guided reflection. Moreover, WR 517 provides opportunities to contribute to the ongoing development the WR 121 curriculum.
   
Course Name: WR 521: Teaching Practicum: English Composition
Section: 1
CRN: 19326
Instructor Name: Sandor, Marjorie
Time: F 1730-1820
Instructor Office Hours: R 1230-1345 and by appointment
Office Location: 314
Course Description: This course is restricted to Graduate Teaching Assistants currently enrolled in the MFA Program in Creative Writing (in prose) who have been assigned sections of WR 224 for the current term. Students will meet with the professor weekly to brainstorm and discuss teaching strategies, trouble-shoot classroom challenges, and and expand and sharpen pedagogical approaches in the teaching of introductory creative writing in their genres. Both philosophical and practical, this course may include the professor's observation of a class session (to be arranged with each GTA), with a follow-up discussion of the teaching practice.  
Requirements Fulfilled: Pedagogy
   
Course Name: WR 522: Teaching Practicum: Poetry
Section: 1
CRN: 21353
Instructor Name: Richter, Jennifer
Time: R 1730-1820
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Office Location: 204D
Course Description: Required practicum for graduate students; open only to MFA students teaching WR 241: Introduction to Poetry Writing this term.

Note: MFA poets interested in teaching poetry writing in their second year should register for the SPRING TERM practicum at the end of their first year; this course will prepare them to teach WR 241: Introduction to Poetry Writing.  Over ten weeks, we will discuss how to design poetry exercises, teach prosody and close reading skills, conduct workshop, choose an anthology, and comment on and assess student work.  MFA students will also articulate their own pedagogical goals.
   
Course Name: WR 524: Advanced Fiction Writing
Section: 1
CRN: 17999
Instructor Name: Sandor, Marjorie
Time: R 1400-1650
Instructor Office Hours: R 1230-1345 and by appointment
Office Location: 314
Course Description: In this graduate level fiction-writing workshop, students will be expected to produce two full-length stories or novel chapters (35 to 50 pages total) and one substantial revision. Students will also be graded on the quality of their written and oral critiques and class participation. We will, in addition, be generating new work through occasional exercises and reading and discussing professional short stories, selected by students, as the term progresses. These stories will constitute the course text. This course is restricted to students who have been accepted into the MFA Program in fiction.
   
Course Name: WR 540: Advanced Creative Non-Fiction
Section: 1
CRN: 23014
Instructor Name: Passarello, Elena
Time: M 1700-1950
Instructor Office Hours: T R 1530-1630
Office Location: 342
Course Description: This graduate-level nonfiction workshop is modeled after the 2003 Danish documentary "The Five Obstructions". Over the first eight weeks of this workshop, students will rewrite a single essay five times. Each revision will follow a series of creative restraints prescribed to the writer by either their peers or instructor. The final weeks of class will involve a more traditional workshop of a culminating revision of this same essay.                                                                                                                                                                              
Special Topics:  The Five Obstructions
   
Course Name: WR 541: Advanced Poetry Writing
Section: 1
CRN: 21237
Instructor Name: Holmberg, Karen
Time: T 1400-1650
Instructor Office Hours: T 1300-1400 / R 1000-1100
Office Location: 350
Course Description: This course takes an experimental stance, thinking of poetry as more than printed words arranged on a plane (or in a single plane of time), but as a thing that can have physical dimensions. In additions to writing regular poems, students will have to conduct four experiments from a range of choices, and will contribute an experiment to the class's available options.  Some of the experiments will require the student to think about the page and the material on which poetry can be reproduced in untraditional ways, through the selection of material and binding or presentation methods.  They might be asked to adopt an experimental writing technique, as A.R. Ammons took up writing his long poems on spools of adding machine tape. For added inspiration, the class will make a visit to Special Collections to view a selection of sculptural bookworks and letterpress books, all of them innovative and experimental in nature.
   
Course Name: WR 574: Rhetorics of Race
Section: 2
CRN: 27454
Instructor Name: Ribero, Ana Milena
Time: T R 1400-1520
Instructor Office Hours: W 1300-1500
Office Location: 318
Course Description: This course explores the interrelated concepts of race, racialization, and racism. Through reading, writing, and discussion we will problematize race as a taken-for-granted concept. Students will study racial formations as historically specific and analyze contemporary forms of racism in the US. As rhetoricians, we will pay close attention to how rhetoric and discourse have the power to reproduce and challenge white supremacy and race-based oppressions. Emphasizing the intersectionality of oppression that racism necessarily takes place at intersections with other forms of subordination including sexism, homophobia, ablelism, etc. this course draws from Queer Black Feminism, Chican@ Feminism, and Critical Race Theory.  
Special Topics:  Rhetorics of Race
Requirements Fulfilled: MA Experience
   
Course Name: WR 599: Special Topics: WR 222 Teaching Practicum
Section: 1
CRN: 26535
Instructor Name: Kelly, Kristy
Time: M 1730-1820
Instructor Office Hours: M W 0930-1100
Office Location: 208
Course Description: This practicum offers resources and support for graduate students teaching WR 222 for the first time in Fall 2017. It also serves as a followup to the Spring 2017 222 teaching practicum. New 222 teachers meet intermittently to exchange strategies and discuss any difficulties in teaching the course for the first time. This provides a chance for teachers to continue evolving their pedagogical practices in consultation with their fellow instructors, and to revise their teaching strategies as the term progresses. Ultimately the practicum serves as a space to reflect on their experiences in 222 and adapting them for future teaching terms.
   
Course Name: WR 599: Special Topics: Graduate Writing for English Language Learners
Section: 1
CRN: TBD
Instructor Name: Drummond, Rob
Time: T R 1400-1520
Instructor Office Hours: By appointment
Office Location: 356
Course Description: This class will acclimate multilingual and international graduate students to the specialized writing demands necessary for success in a range of graduate programs across the university. Students in the course will work to identify and analyze discipline-specific writing approaches, exploring what it means to be literate in their discourse communities. Through careful investigation, regular practice, and a portfolio project, students will develop individualized strategies for producing high quality research-based writing in their disciplines. Students will finish the term with a heightened awareness of the structures, practices, and rhetorical strategies of graduate-level writing, leaving the class with increased confidence and the rhetorical skills to contribute successfully to scholarship in their fields.