Schedule of Classes:

Fall 2018

 

Course ID: ENG514

Course Title: INTRO TO GRADUATE STUDIES

Section: 1

CRN: 14081

Instructor Name: Malewitz, Raymond J.

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 214

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1600

End Time: 1720

Course Description:In addition to explaining the requirements, procedures, and trajectory of the MA program, this class offers a rapid introduction to the theories, methods, and professional practices of academics working in the fields of literature, rhetoric and composition, and film studies. Throughout the course, we will examine a series of prominent critical approaches that have guided advanced study in all of the program’s three MA fields: (1) literature and culture; (2) rhetoric, writing, and culture; and (3) film and visual studies. We will learn (or re-learn) these approaches by using our theory readings as critical lenses for the exploration of (a) a series of small textual and filmic artifacts and (b) a series of essential issues (including contemporary discussions of affect, biopolitics, neoliberalism, post-truth politics, race, gender, and sexuality).
As much as possible, the course will stress practical aspects of performing these readings. We will learn proper and improper ways of using secondary sources and theory sources in academic arguments. We will identify, employ, and critique standard ways that academics signal the significance of their work in written and oral arguments. We will explore the conventions of genres including the conference paper abstract, the conference paper, the conference Q &A, the scholarly article, and the thesis. We will learn effective ways of maximizing research resources within and beyond the OSU library. Finally, we will create “mini-theses” related to students’ scholarly interests that will be delivered in print and orally. By the end of the course, students should have a clear sense of how to best navigate their two years in the MA program at Oregon State’s School of Writing, Literature, and Film with an eye toward future careers within and beyond academia.

 

Course ID: ENG418/518

Course Title: ENG NOVEL: VICTORIAN PERIOD

Section: 1

CRN: 19021

Instructor Name: Ward, Megan

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 206

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1000

End Time: 1120

Course Description: We usually think of the Victorians as well-mannered, moralistic prudes but they were equally fascinated with violence, spectacle, imposters, madness, and corruption. This course will study representations of these monstrous others in order to peel back the veneer of Victorian decorum. We will read four novels and one novella published between 1830 and 1900 in order to understand a period equally captivated by respectability and aberration.

 

Course ID: ENG425/525

Course Title: STUDIES IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE

Section: 1

CRN: 19023

Instructor Name: Bude, Tekla

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 334

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1100

End Time: 1150

Course Description: What came before Montaigne's famous Essays, before Descartes' paradigm-shifting think, therefore I am, and before the rise of the Enlightenment individual? What did it mean to construct the self before the development of modern notions of selfhood? In this course, we will read premodern precursors of the personal memoir and the essay texts that deal with the idea of inwardness, personhood, identity, and subjectivity, in order to answer this question. We will read some most beautiful, moving, and disturbing texts in English literature: from the deathbed confessions of Julian of Norwich to the raucous autobiography of Margery Kempe, from visionary political and ethical complaints to survivor narratives of rape, depression, and anxiety, and from poetry to prose. This course will investigate how literature of the medieval period constructed notions of the self. It also welcomes creative engagement with these texts: I encourage students who wish to use the form, content, and structure of the narratives we will study this term to construct their own personal essays and memoirs.

*Pre-1800

 

Course ID: ENG530

Course Title: STUDIES IN EARLY MODERN LIT

Section: 1

CRN: 19024

Instructor Name: Olson, Rebecca R.

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 214

Day: M

Begin Time: 1500

End Time: 1750

Course Description: In early modern England, literature was disseminated in both manuscript and print; traditionally, manuscript circulation has been seen as the more elite literary form—manuscripts often exchanged hands in exclusive coteries—while print was directed at non-elite or “popular” audiences. The so-called “stigma of print” is believed to have influenced what, and by whom, was printed in the time period. This course reassesses those assumptions. To what extent, we will ask, was the medium of print also seen as providing opportunities, social as well as commercial? How did the printed edition, specifically, invite or respond to a more diverse audience than has been traditionally represented by the history of reading? These questions demand that we take seriously works previously dismissed as “popular,” that we rethink literary criticism’s deep investment in authorship and in historical individuals, and that we embrace our own perspectives as people living in the early twenty-first century and engage in responsible speculation about how the technology of print, when still new, could have been experienced by users. Readings include a number of early modern texts (for example, prefaces to readers, ballads, Arcadia and its seventeenth-century fan fiction) as well as essays by historians of reading (Newcomb, Salter, Chartier) and the theorists from which they draw (Benjamin and Bourdieu).

*Pre-1800 *MA Experience

 

Course ID: ENG570

Course Title: MYTHS, MOTHERS, MONSTERS

Section: 1

CRN: 14208

Instructor Name: Richter, Jennifer B.

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 214

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1200

End Time: 1320

Course Description: In this craft class, we will study contemporary poetry collections framed by myth: Persephone and Demeter, Orpheus and Eurydice, and others. Through in-depth discussions and extensive in- and out-of-class writing assignments, we'll consider where we, as writers, might step into a myth's known narrative in order to better understand our own. As Eavan Boland says in her Persephone-inspired poem "The Pomegranate": "the best thing about the legend is/I can enter it anywhere. And have". Possible readings include books by Louise Gluck, Gregory Orr, and Anne Carson.

Special Topic: Myth, Mothers, & Monsters

*Craft

 

Course ID: ENG580

Course Title: STUDIES IN LIT, CULT & SOCIETY

Section: 1

CRN: 19025

Instructor Name: Scribner, Keith T.

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 214

Day: W

Begin Time: 1800

End Time: 2050

Course Description: Manipulating Time in Narrative: In this craft class we’ll explore how time is manipulated to tell a better story and how narrative dramatizes those moments in our lives when we feel we’re living in the past, present, and future all at once. We’ll read novels, short stories, and creative nonfiction that collapse, compress, fragment, and reverse time asking why these authorial choices make a more compelling story and more effectively reveal lived experience and perception. In several short writing exercises you’ll model your own narratives on the published work we’re reading. Authors may include Ernest Gaines, Joyce Carol Oates, Nick Flynn, and Martin Amis.

Special Topic: Manipulating Time in Narrative

*Craft

 

Course ID: FILM445/545

Course Title: DOCUMENTARY FILM STUDIES

Section: 1

CRN: 19745

Instructor Name: Baker, David

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 332

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1200

End Time: 1320

Course Description: This upper-division/graduate level seminar explores documentary films and filmmaking across a range of styles and subjects, but with a focus on science and natural resources storytelling. The course explores the role of a film producer in shaping narrative structure of a project and the intensive writing and collaboration required of documentary filmmakers, providing students with the most essential skills required for producing feature-length nonfiction films.

Special Topic: Science and natural resources documentary filmmaking.

 

Course ID: FILM452/552

Course Title: STUDIES IN FILM

Section: 1

CRN: TBD

Instructor Name: Lewis, Jon R.

Building: OWEN- Owen Hall

Room: 103

Day: W

Begin Time: 1800

End Time: 2150

Course Description: This class will engage an interdisciplinary study of The Godfather -- the Mario Puzo novel and the three films by Francis Coppola -- with an eye on the history of organized crime in America, on gangster films in American movie history, on Hollywood history in the so-called transition and new Hollywood eras, and on the particulars of cinematic form and style. Weekly film screenings will include the three Godfather films, relevant gangster films released before (Scarface, The Public Enemy, The Big Combo) and in the same era as Coppola's films (Mean Streets, Goodfellas).

 

Course ID: WR411/511

Course Title: THE TEACHING OF WRITING

Section: 1

CRN: 19029

Instructor Name: Pflugfelder, Ehren H.

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 332

Day: TR

Begin Time: 830

End Time: 950

Course Description: In WR 411/511, The Teaching of Writing, we'll study research about the teaching of writing and practice what it means to assign, evaluate, and respond to student writers. This course is designed to introduce current and future teachers of writing to theory and pedagogy in composition studies, to help us become aware of and strengthen our own writing processes, and to enable us to make and express connections between classroom experience and composition theory. We'll be looking at assessment, response, assignment creation, grammar, literacy, multimedia, process, and genre as we explore composition and writing. Students will be expected to complete substantial reading assignments, informal and formal writing assignments, collaborative and digital assignments, and reading responses, as well as participate in class discussions and activities. Coming out of this class, you'll be better prepared to teach and evaluate your students' writing and likely feel more confident in your own writing.

*Pedagogy

 

Course ID: WR517

Course Title: TEACH PRACT: ENG COMP

Section: 1

CRN: 10185

Instructor Name: Jensen, Tim

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 206

Day: T

Begin Time: 1730

End Time: 1920

Course Description: This seminar continues your training in and preparation for WR 121 instruction, exploring the pedagogical practices and principles introduced during orientation. Whereas orientation served as an overview of the curriculum, its objectives, assignment sequence, and theoretical trajectory, this course is designed to provide you with more practice in and support for the nitty-gritty of actually teaching it from week“to“week. Simultaneously, this course focuses heavily on developing your overall framework for quality teaching. The course provides an opportunity for you to discover and devise teaching skills, share strategies, and participate in guided reflection.

 

Course ID: WR524

Course Title: ADVANCED FICTION WRITING

Section: 1

CRN: 10726

Instructor Name: Rodgers, Susan

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 204C

Day: R

Begin Time: 1400

End Time: 1650

Course Description: WR 524 is the MFA graduate fiction workshop. Objectives include: generating new work; deepening your understanding of the craft elements of fiction, and the different ways to employ them in your stories or novel chapters; practicing a range of ways to respond to fiction that of your peers, as well as professional writers; and developing a range of revision techniques. We will engage the workshop discussion format in a variety of ways. Students will submit two workshop pieces, which should add up to approximately 20-30 pages for the term. (Writers of flash fiction are expected to submit several pieces at a time.) The work you submit should be new; if you're submitting a revision, discuss with the instructor first. Attendance at every workshop and regular, meaningful participation are required/expected. You will also produce one-page, single-spaced letters to your peers for each workshop submission. (The instructor will offer models for writing "alternative letters.") Finally, we will read and discuss some stories by professional writers as well as craft essays, and you will write a brief craft essay of your own to submit at the end of the term. Please note: enrollment in this course is limited to graduate students who have been accepted into Oregon State University's Master of Fine Arts program in Creative Writing (fiction).

 

Course ID: WR540

Course Title: ADVANCED NONFICTION WRITING

Section: 1

CRN: 15200

Instructor Name: Passarello, Elena

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 204C

Day: M

Begin Time: 1700

End Time: 1950

Course Description: This graduate-level workshop in nonfiction writing is specifically designed for the eight writers of the MFA nonfiction cohort. All other interested writers must contact the instructor for permission before registering. For the Fall 2018 workshop, we will generate a series of short essays based on weekly prompts, each prompt focusing on a core component of the contemporary literary essay: scene, commentary, form, and research. For the first seven weeks, we will discuss each week's work in informal workshops. Students will gradually build from these drafts full-length essays for longer, more formal workshops that are scheduled for the last weeks of the term.

 

Course ID: WR541

Course Title: ADVANCED POETRY WRITING

Section: 1

CRN: 13663

Instructor Name: Holmberg, Karen E.

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 204C

Day: T

Begin Time: 1400

End Time: 1650

Course Description: In this workshop, poets will adopt – or be adopted by – a poet writing in a language other than English, and complete a three-poem translation project, as well as write a poem in conscious imitation of another poet or poem, and an homage. Other issues we will consider as a class are:  what is translation? How is it a metaphor for the poetic process itself? To what extent do we engage in self-translation even when we think we are writing a “new” poem? Is translation related to other modes of poetic creation, such as the elegy? Students will be asked to explore their poetic inheritance by completing a poetry “family tree” project to uncover their progenitors, and their progenitors own precursor poets. We will also venture into parody, for fun’s sake.

 

Course ID: WR599

Course Title: WR 222 TEACHING PRACTICUM

Section: 1

CRN: 17816

Instructor Name: Kelly, Kristy L.

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 206

Day: M

Begin Time: 1730

End Time: 1820

Course Description: This teaching practicum provides assistance and support to graduate students teaching Writing 222 (Argumentation) for the first time. It is an opportunity to gather resources, exchange ideas, and troubleshoot common problems while teaching the course. The teaching practicum also provides the opportunity for graduate students to engage in curriculum development, and to assist in the instruction of graduate teaching assistants who will be teaching the course in future terms. Meetings will take place both in the larger group and one-on-one with the instructor, according to availability and need.

*Pedagogy