Winter 2019


Course ID: FILM125

Course Title: INTRO TO FILM STUDIES: 1945-PRESENT

Section: 1

CRN: 36584

Instructor Name: Lewis, Jon R.

Location: Owen Hall

Room: 101

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1400

End Time: 1520

Film Screenings: M 1800-2150 Owen Hall 101

Course Description: This class offers a cultural history of American and European cinema from 1942-1967.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts, West Culture

   

Course ID: FILM220

Course Title: TOPICS: AFRICA IN CINEMA

Section: 2

CRN: 39903

Instructor Name: Osagie, Iyunolu F.

Location: Owen Hall

Room: 101

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1400

End Time: 1450

Course Description: This course introduces students to the study of images of Africa. We will start the class by exploring what has been termed “Hollywood’s Africa”: depictions of Africa and Africans in Hollywood and Hollywood-style films. Also, this class will examine cinematic images that African artists have produced about themselves and about the world. Issues such as the unequal distribution of power, economic disempowerment, race, class, and gender conflict, aesthetics as social and political currency will be addressed. This discussion-oriented class uses the cinematic medium to establish a community of engaged critical thinkers. Students are expected to participate actively in class and to write analyses of the films. Please note that some films may have subtitles.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Diff/Power/Disc

   

Course ID: FILM220

Course Title: TOPICS: SEXUALITY IN FILM

Section: 1

CRN: 39266

Instructor Name: St Jacques, Jillian

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 206

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 900

End Time: 950

Course Description: Participants in FILM 220 concentrate on articulating their own viewpoints concerning the social construction and distribution of difference, power and discrimination in contemporary cinema. By closely analyzing the ways in which an array of films depict sexualities for multifarious political and libidinal ends, participants evaluate the intersection of sex, class, race and age through a variety of genres, nationalities and periods. Beginning with films that centralize tropes of heterosexual normalcy, students evaluate films such as Thelma & Louise, Brokeback Mountain, Ma Vie en Rose and Boys Don’t Cry. Along with learning to closely read films, students make connections with diverse and sometimes oppositional critical theories, including but not limited to psychoanalytic, feminist, (post)feminist, post-structural and queer theories. This transdisciplinary mélange serves as a basis for research, writing, group discussion and personal reflection.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Diff/Power/Disc

   

Course ID: FILM245

Course Title: THE NEW AMERICAN CINEMA

Section: 400

CRN:  36223

Instructor Name: Rust, Stephen A.

Location: Ecampus

Course Description: This class will attend post-rating system Hollywood (1968-present) by closely examining the important films and filmmakers of the period along with key events in the business of developing, producing, distributing, and exhibiting motion pictures.  There are no prerequisites for this course; however, please keep in mind that this is an ambitious 200-level academic course, not a film appreciation class.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

   

Course ID: FILM255

Course Title: WORLD CINEMA I: ORIGINS-1968

Section: 1

CRN: 37803

Instructor Name: Zuo, Mila

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 334

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1400

End Time: 1520

Film Screenings: W 1800-2150 Owen Hall 101

Course Description: The 1960s, referred to as the “Long Decade” because of its lasting impacts, was an exciting time for cinema. Post-war atmospheres, revolutionary politics, and new technologies kindled experimentation with film form, genre, and style. Surveying national cinemas of the 60s throughout the Americas, Europe, and Asia, this course explores the development of modern cinemas by focusing on the period’s most influential and remarkable filmmakers and film movements. New cinemas of this era were often in dialogue with one another, and we examine film as a global phenomenon that developed within diverse historical and industrial contexts. Capaciously approaching “revolution” through politics, as well as aesthetics and forms, we study film’s social praxis and the possibilities of innovative disruption. In this introductory course, students will be equipped with foundational tools with which to critically engage with cinema as artistic form, political object, and commercial artifact.

Special topic: Revolutionary Cinemas of the 1960s

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

   

Course ID: FILM265

Course Title: FILMS FOR THE FUTURE

Section: 1

CRN: 37050

Instructor Name: Lewis, Jon R.

Location: Darkside Cinema

Day: R

Begin Time: 1600

End Time: 1850

Film Screenings: W 1800-2150 Owen Hall 101

Course Description: If thinking about the future makes you nervous, here’s some food for thought (and worry). This class offers a survey of futurist films and literature from Georges Melies’ 1902 adaptation of Jules Verne’s A Trip to the Moon through last year’s Hulu series The Handmaid’s Tale.

   

Course ID: FILM480

Course Title: STUDIES IN FILM, CULTURE & SOCIETY

Section: 1

CRN: 39275

Instructor Name: Zuo, Mila

Location: Moreland

Room: 330

Day: T

Begin Time: 1600

End Time: 1950

Film Screening: R 1800-2150 Learning Innovation Center 368

Course Description:  “Star Bodies in Cinema and Media” critically analyzes celebrity, stardom, and mediated performance. Why and how are some bodies privileged to become spectacular representatives of the human species in screen cultures? How do stars generate cultures of belonging (and exclusion) for audiences and spectators? How do gender, race and ethnicity, and class become articulated through the technologies of the celebrity body? What kinds of theories and frameworks enable us to critically discuss issues of charisma, appearance, and presence? Throughout the course we interrogate the structures of desire and fascination that determine our relationship to public bodies by screening key films and media texts that have helped launch actors/personalities to stardom and into our collective imaginations. In this course, we pursue a methodology of reading the body as a kind of text (our own, as well as the star body) while examining notions of visual pleasure and “the gaze,” affect, and reception as they pertain to our imagined contact with celebrity bodies.

Special topic: Star Bodies in Cinema and Media

 

Course ID: WLC429

Course Title: FRENCH SOCIETY THROUGH ITS CINEMA

Section: 1

CRN: 19598

Instructor Name: Boudraa, Nabil

Day: F

Begin Time: 1000

End Time: 1250

Course Description: An examination of French society through its own cinema. Via the screening and study of films from the various periods of French history, students will delve into the heart of French society and will discover the socio-historical, political, economic and cultural context.