Schedule of Classes:

 

Course Descriptions:
Applied Journalism

 

Course Descriptions:
English
Course Descriptions:
Film
Course Descriptions:
Writing
2018-2019 Catalog
NEW!

AJ 300

 

ENG 100 Level
ENG 200 Level
ENG 300 Level
ENG 400 Level

 

FILM 200 Level
FILM 400 Level
WR 100 Level
WR 200 Level
WR 300 Level
WR 400 Level
         

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Download the PDF version of this term's course descriptions soon!

 

 

NEW! Apply this course to the Applied Journalism minor!

Course ID: AJ312

Course Title: ADVANCED MEDIA STORYTELLING

Section: 1

CRN: 39262

Instructor Name: St Jacques, Jillian

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 206

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1100

End Time: 1150

Course Description: In AJ312 Advanced Media Storytelling, students mobilize skills acquired in AJ311 to deliver hard news projects. Our first order of business is developing a firm grasp of the relevant features of media law and ethics that affect hard news reporting. Ensuing assignments comprise reporting on government agencies (local and regional courts, town hall meetings, school boards, etc.). To those ends, participants bundle video, audio, photographic and textual information to produce compelling multimedia news packets. Note: Because government agencies meet at the time and place of their choosing, AJ312 requires a high level of time management.

   

Course ID: ENG104

Course Title: INTRO TO LITERATURE: FICTION

Section: 402

CRN: 39665

Instructor Name: Bushnell, John T.

Location: Ecampus

Course Description: This course will introduce you to fiction through the short story and novel. You will learn to read closely for fundamental literary elements such as characterization, conflict, change, point of view, symbolism, and theme. You will also be asked to think critically about the ideas and issues you encounter. By the end of the term, you will have received exposure to a broad variety of narratives, cultures, and ideas, and will have developed the skills to analyze them for meaning and value.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

   

Course ID: ENG104

Course Title: INTRO TO LITERATURE: FICTION

Section: 2

CRN: 39898

Instructor Name: Bushnell, John T.

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 330

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1500

End Time: 1550

Course Description: This course will introduce you to fiction through the short story and novel. You will learn to read closely for fundamental literary elements such as characterization, conflict, change, point of view, symbolism, and theme. You will also be asked to think critically about the ideas and issues you encounter. By the end of the term, you will have received exposure to a broad variety of narratives, cultures, and ideas, and will have developed the skills to analyze them for meaning and value.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

   

Course ID: ENG104

Course Title: INTRO TO LITERATURE: FICTION

Section: 400

CRN: 33581

Instructor Name: Delf, Elizabeth D.

Location: Ecampus

Course Description: What is a story? How does fiction create or reflect the culture and historical moment in which they are written? Why do we (or why should we) read literature at all? In this class, we will build answers to these foundational questions. Using a critical lens, we will work to understand both the implied and stated meaning of short stories and a novel from the last two centuries, as well as developing our knowledge of the key elements of fiction.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

   

Course ID: ENG104

Course Title: INTRO TO LITERATURE: FICTION

Section: 401

CRN: 37064

Instructor Name: Delf, Elizabeth D.

Location: Ecampus

Course Description: What is a story? How does fiction create or reflect the culture and historical moment in which they are written? Why do we (or why should we) read literature at all? In this class, we will build answers to these foundational questions. Using a critical lens, we will work to understand both the implied and stated meaning of short stories and a novel from the last two centuries, as well as developing our knowledge of the key elements of fiction.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

   

Course ID: ENG104

Course Title: INTRO TO LITERATURE: FICTION

Section: 1

CRN: 31228

Instructor Name: Ward, Megan

Location: Wiegand Hall

Room: 115

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1000

End Time: 1050

Course Description: Speculative fiction tells the story of the world as it might be – not as it is. Speculative worlds can occur in the future, past, or present, with technologies that don’t exist. By studying narrative techniques and critical reading strategies, this course will examine how speculative fiction gives us fresh perspectives on science, society, and identity.

Special topic: Speculative Fiction

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

   

Course ID: ENG106

Course Title: INTRO TO LITERATURE: POETRY

Section: 2

CRN: 39899

Instructor Name: Biespiel, David

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 330

Day: TR

Begin Time: 830

End Time: 950

Course Description: For centuries the reading and discussion of poetry has been required learning for an educated person. Not only that, there are many people throughout the world who read poems frequently, even daily. To read poems for ten weeks in EN 106 with a group of fellow students from across the university, students with diverse majors and life experiences, is to participate in the highest ideals of your liberal arts education. It is to pursue appreciation for the basic human experience of metaphor and to enjoy thinking imaginatively, critically, and creatively for its own sake. EN 106 is less about solving the meaning of poems and more about exploring the questions of life that poems enter (and looking at how poems do that, too). With focus on the experiences of poems, poets, and readers, with focus on the public and private lives that poems explore, with focus on the pleasures of the arrangement of language and metaphor, and with focus on the cultural, social, political, and spiritual subjects that poems explore, students in EN 106 study poetry.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

   

Course ID: ENG106

Course Title: INTRO TO LITERATURE: POETRY

Section: 400

CRN: 34062

Instructor Name: Elbom, Gilad

Location: Ecampus

Course Description: Through a close reading of traditional and innovative poetry, we will introduce and explore a variety of poetic devices and forms. We will examine our poems from different perspectives, placing them in larger contexts: historical, cultural, philosophical, theological, structural, feminist, psychological, postcolonial, and so on. One of my old professors at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem used to say that the best way to read poetry is in a language you don’t understand. We will test the validity of this statement by attempting to experience a small number of poems in Spanish, Italian, Hebrew, Arabic, Black English, and other languages and dialects. We will also look at some poetry in translation.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

   

Course ID: ENG106

Course Title: INTRO TO LITERATURE: POETRY

Section: 3

CRN: 33554

Instructor Name: Helle, Anita

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 330

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1400

End Time: 1520

Course Description: What is poetry, and why does poetry matter? In this section, we will read, think about, write about, listen to, and discuss lyric poetry, classical and contemporary. Poems and poets ranging across centuries shape our understanding of perennially fascinating topics: love, war, death, and experiences of the natural world. By learning some of the critical terms and sub-genres of poetry on the page and on the streets, we’ll begin to look at poetry through a critical lens as genre with distinctive techniques and effects.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

   

Course ID: ENG107

Course Title: INTRO TO CREATIVE NONFICTION

Section: 1

CRN: 34757

Instructor Name: St Germain, Justin

Location: Owen Hall

Room: 106

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1400

End Time: 1520

Course Description: “This course is designed to introduce its members to the genre of creative nonfiction, a popular and dynamic form of writing that includes personal essays, memoir, lyric essays, and hybrid and multimedia approaches to telling true stories. We will examine the various ways a diverse genre engages with the real world, and investigate the relationship between narrative and truth, focusing on how a writer’s use of craft, context, and source material shapes the reader’s understanding.“

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

   

Course ID: ENG200

Course Title: LIBRARY SKILLS FOR LITERARY STUDIES

Section: 1

CRN: 31167

Instructor Name: McElroy, Kelly E.

Location: The Valley Library

Room: 2082

Day: W

Begin Time: 1000

End Time: 1050

Course Description: In this course, we will look at the topic of “library skills” broadly. We will spend time learning how to find and use resources from the OSU Libraries’ collections and will think about issues related to information. We will look at how information is organized – knowledge you can use to unlock any collection of information, in a library, on the web, or in an archive. We will also explore how to learn from and integrate primary sources (materials from Special Collections and Archives) into our research; we will examine the expertise, authority and credibility of those who create the information we use; we will learn about fair use and the rights we have to information we create and consume. We will also consider the social, political and economic aspects of information and knowledge production to better understand today’s information society. The skills and perspectives you develop in this course will help you to be a successful researcher both during and after college, in whatever field you pursue.

   

Course ID: ENG201

Course Title: SHAKESPEARE: ELIZABETHAN

Section: 1

CRN: 39263

Instructor Name: Barbour, Richmond T.

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 330

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1200

End Time: 1250

Course Description: This course treats a narrative poem, several sonnets, and four plays from the first half of Shakespeare’s career: the Elizabethan phase. The primary goal is to sharpen everyone’s skills as readers and interpreters of Shakespeare’s work and its cultural energies. Our concerns will range from language, characterization, gender, genre, and staging to wider questions of Shakespeare’s involvement in the economic, political, theatrical, and popular cultures of his day and ours. Our sessions will combine lecture and discussion, readings and viewings. Shakespeare’s language is challenging--and richly rewarding. To do well in this course, students must keep pace with an ambitious syllabus, engage the concerns of the text, attend class regularly, and follow or contribute to our discussions.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts, West Culture

   

Course ID: ENG202

Course Title: SHAKESPEARE: JACOBEAN PERIOD

Section: 1

CRN: 37752

Instructor Name: Olson, Rebecca R.

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 332

Day: TR

Begin Time: 830

End Time: 950

Course Description: An introduction to the second half of Shakespeare’s dramatic career (the Jacobean period), with attention to the playwright’s continued global influence. This course is designed to help students become confident readers of Shakespeare’s language, articulate the significance of aural and visual elements of Shakespearean scripts, and analyze the plays in light of specific cultural and historical contexts, both early modern and contemporary. Plays include Macbeth, Measure for Measure, and The Tempest. The course is included in two Baccalaureate Core categories: Western Culture and Literature and the Arts.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts, West Culture

   

Course ID: ENG205

Course Title: SURVEY OF BRITISH LITERATURE: REST/ROMANTIC

Section: 1

CRN: 36579

Instructor Name: Gottlieb, Evan

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 330

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 900

End Time: 950

Course Description: As we examine the best-known British writers of the age – approx. 1660-1830 -- we will read great works in most of the major genres: poetry, fiction, and non-fiction prose. Our challenge will be to understand these texts in their socio-historical contexts while simultaneously appreciating their aesthetic qualities. Grades will be based on participation, two exams, and a term paper; major texts to be studied include Milton’s Paradise Lost, Pope’s The Rape of the Lock, Smollett’s The Expedition of Humphry Clinker, and Wordsworth and Coleridge’s Lyrical Ballads.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts, West Culture

   

Course ID: ENG207

Course Title: LITERATURE OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION: CLASSIC

Section: 1

CRN: 36580

Instructor Name: Anderson, Wayne C.

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 330

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1000

End Time: 1050

Course Description: In this course we will read parts of five of the greatest books in the Western tradition:  Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, Virgil’s Aeneid, Augustine’s Confessions, and Dante’s Inferno. Our translations will be brisk and contemporary, and our focus will be on two themes:  the theme of the “hero” and how we are all heroes, on our own journeys; and the theme of the afterlife, or the underworld, or hell, and how we all get into it or out of it or both.  The work for the course will be three multiple-choice exams, frequent in-class freewriting, and one essay with the option to revise.

Texts (and note: the total cost of these separate editions is actually less than the cost of an anthology):  The Illiad, translated by Stephen Mitchell; The Odyssey and The Aeneid, translated by Robert Fagles; The Confessions, translated by Rex Warner; and The Inferno, translated by John Ciardi.   

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts, West Culture

   

Course ID: ENG213

Course Title: LITERATURES OF THE WORLD: MIDDLE EAST

Section: 400

CRN: 38090

Instructor Name: Elbom, Gilad

Location: Ecampus

Course Description: This class will focus on modern Middle Eastern literature from multiple perspectives: cultural, political, religious, historical, geographical, linguistic, structural, stylistic, thematic, comparative, and other points of view. The texts on our reading list include a feminist Egyptian novel, innovative Hebrew poetry from Israel, and a postmodern Palestinian novel. Among the topics we will discuss are different languages and dialects of the Middle East, different national and cultural categories, and the idea that the distinctions between these categories are often fluid and dynamic. We will also try to establish connections between Middle Eastern narratives and global cultural and intellectual ideas.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Cult Diversity, Lit and Arts

   

Course ID: ENG215

Course Title: CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY

Section: 1

CRN: 39264

Instructor Name: Barbour, Richmond T.

Location: Withycombe Hall

Room: 109

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1400

End Time: 1450

Course Description: Tales of the ancient Greek and Roman gods, epic heroes/heroines, and their monstrous adversaries speak to our primal concerns about the origins and destinies of human beings, the nature of the world, the patterns of our life-journeys, and the mysteries of the spiritual realm. This course will trace the mythic genealogy of the first beings, the Titans, the Olympians, and heroic humans, examining their domains, conflicts, journeys, and amorous encounters. We will study the myths in their primary ancient sources, which include some of the most significant and influential works in the Western literary tradition, and relate them to narratives important in our culture today. Interrogating the human uses of story-telling and other muse-inspired arts, we will also explore the representation of the myths in painting, sculpture, and music.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts, West Culture

   

Course ID: ENG220

Course Title: TOPICS: SEXUALITY IN FILM

Section: 1

CRN: 39265

Instructor Name: St Jacques, Jillian

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 206

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 900

End Time: 950

Course Description: Participants in ENG 220 concentrate on articulating their own viewpoints concerning the social construction and distribution of difference, power and discrimination in contemporary cinema. By closely analyzing the ways in which an array of films depict sexualities for multifarious political and libidinal ends, participants evaluate the intersection of sex, class, race and age through a variety of genres, nationalities and periods. Beginning with films that centralize tropes of heterosexual normalcy, students evaluate films such as Thelma & Louise, Brokeback Mountain, Ma Vie en Rose and Boys Don’t Cry. Along with learning to closely read films, students make connections with diverse and sometimes oppositional critical theories, including but not limited to psychoanalytic, feminist, (post)feminist, post-structural and queer theories. This transdisciplinary mélange serves as a basis for research, writing, group discussion and personal reflection.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Diff/Power/Disc

   

Course ID: ENG220H

Course Title: DIFFERENCE, POWER & DISCRIMINATION

Section: 1

CRN: TBD

Instructor Name: Sheehan, Elizabeth M.

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 332

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1400

End Time: 1450

Course Description: This course focuses on twentieth and twenty-first century art that addresses, contests, and reimagines the configurations of race, ethnicity, gender, class, sexuality, ability, and citizenship that shape the U.S. We will study writing and visual art by Toni Morrison, Djuna Barnes, Lorna Dee Cervantes, Eli Clare, Edwidge Danticat, Fae Myenne Ng, Lorna Simpson, and Coleson Whitehead (who will visit OSU early next spring). These readings will be paired with foundational and cutting-edge scholarship about the history and impact of categories of difference and systems of power in the U.S. We will read work by leading critics in queer and feminist theory, studies of race and ethnicity, disability studies, and American studies. As a DPD course, we will aim to understand how difference, power, and discrimination operate in the U.S., while also exploring how art illuminates, protests, and imagines alternatives to those systems and structures.

Special topic: US Fictions of Difference and Belonging

   

Course ID: ENG254

Course Title: SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE: 1900-PRESENT

Section: 1

CRN: 36581

Instructor Name: Malewitz, Raymond J.

Location: Owen Hall

Room: 101

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1500

End Time: 1550

Course Description: This course offers a rapid introduction to the key figures and movements of American literature from 1900 to the present. The key questions that we will ask concern the ways that we might categorize the large and heterogeneous output of American literary artists during this period.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts, West Culture

   

Course ID: ENG318

Course Title: AMERICAN NOVEL: MODERNIST

Section: 400

CRN: 34063

Instructor Name: Elbom, Gilad

Location: Ecampus

Course Description: Focusing on some of the prominent thematic, stylistic, historical, and cultural aspects of American modernism, this class will combine famous classics with important novels other than the ones commonly perceived as canonical. Through close textual analysis and active participation in ongoing discussions, we will examine seminal works of American modernism that have paved the way for previously silenced voices, paying attention to the rise of nontraditional authors, characters, literary strategies, and subject matters.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

   

Course ID: ENG318

Course Title: AMERICAN NOVEL: MODERNIST

Section: 1

CRN: 39267

Instructor Name: Sheehan, Elizabeth M.

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 332

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1200

End Time: 1250

Course Description: This course explores one of the most dynamic periods in U.S. literary and social history: the early twentieth century. The class focuses on developments in the form of the novel, particularly the flourishing of experimental techniques that transformed what novels said and how. We also will study how formal changes relate to political and cultural phenomena, such as the U.S.’s increasingly global power, immigration and emigration across the Americas and the globe, world war, and radical and reformist movements for civil rights and economic justice. As we trace shifts in the form and context of novels, we will examine some of the cultural trends, movements, and concepts that shaped the era, including naturalism, realism, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Lost Generation.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

   

Course ID: ENG319

Course Title: AMERICAN NOVEL: POST-WWII

Section: 1

CRN: 39268

Instructor Name: Sandor, Marjorie J.

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 332

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1000

End Time: 1120

Course Description: In this course, we will read and examine the work of six great American novelists from the mid-twentieth century to the present, exploring both their literary artistry and their diverse representations of what it means to come of age in America. Decade by decade, how does our quest for identity take new forms? How does the shape and texture of each novel reflect—and resist—its own historical moment?

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts, West Culture

   

Course ID: ENG345

Course Title: INTRO LITERARY CRITICISM & THEORY

Section: 1

CRN: 39901

Instructor Name: Gottlieb, Evan

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 330

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1100

End Time: 1150

Course Description: This course focuses on the study and analysis of critical frameworks and methodologies for the interpretation of literature and culture. Contemporary theory derives from the radical conceptual upheavals of the later nineteenth century, at which time major thinkers in a variety of proto-disciplines – including Friedrich Nietzsche, Sigmund Freud, and Karl Marx – revolutionized how we understand ourselves and interpret the world around us. With the structural linguistics of Ferdinand de Saussure as our bridge to the twentieth century, we will then read selections from a number of theorists who have made major contributions to the modern critical study of literature, language, and culture, including Giorgio Agamben, Gloria Anzaldùa, Roland Barthes, Judith Butler, Hélène Cixous, Gilles Deleuze, Michel Foucault, and Sianne Ngai.

   

Course ID: ENG375

Course Title: CHILDREN’S LITERATURE

Section: 400

CRN: 36889

Instructor Name: Braun, Clare

Location: Ecampus

Course Description: This course surveys a variety of genres, which may include fairy tales, folktales, fables, nonsense poetry, picture books, historical and fantasy novels, examining how these texts represent childhood and connect with historical, cultural, and psychological contexts.

What counts as children’s literature?  Is its purpose to entertain, to socialize, to indoctrinate, or something else?  In this class, we will tackle these questions (and more) as we examine the development of children’s literature over time, beginning with the first “golden age” of the nineteenth century and ending with our current “golden age” in the twenty-first century.  We will think about how conceptions of childhood have changed over time, shaped by and shaping the literature produced for children. Additionally, we will look at children’s literature from the perspective of craft, investigating how literary devices and styles are used by children’s authors to influence the child reader in a myriad of ways.

   

Course ID: ENG438

Course Title: STUDIES IN MODERNISM

Section: 1

CRN: 39269

Instructor Name: Davison, Neil R.

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 332

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1400

End Time: 1520

Course Description: This course examines intellectual, cultural, and aesthetic aspects of the pre-and-post-World War I era of literature characterized by the practitioners of its day as Modernist. Modernism from its fin de siècle inception onward was a pan-arts movement based on the overarching assertion that 20th-century consciousness mandated new “purified” forms for the arts to match psychoanalytic, gender, race, class, and imperialist revisions of 19th century paradigms or what Francois Lyotard dubbed “master narratives” from a Postmodern perspective. As a studies course, we will not dwell long on the history of the era nor conduct a survey of various genres, but will narrow our focus to a study of Modernist fiction in particular from 1900-1940. Each work studied represents an example of formalist experimentation with former conventions of the novel, novella, or short story that was fundamental to the movement from its beginnings. We will early on trace this formalism as it arises from the overlap of the late-19th-century school of Naturalism with Literary Impressionism/Symbolism; we will also grapple with Modernist Free and Indirect narrative style, stream-of-consciousness, and a late version of Dada/Surrealism. We will examine how these schools represent subjectivity from psychoanalytic, racialized, gendered, and liberal humanist perspectives. Simultaneously we will study political and cultural issues that inform the era along theses same lines with the addition in some works of colonial/post-colonial discourse. Please note that this is an upper-division course: students are expected to have previously studied some examples of Modernist literature and to have acquired at least a cursory knowledge of the movement (ENG 206, 214, or 318 are all viable but unofficial prerequisites). Undergraduates will be evaluated through a mid-term exam, a formal longer essay (10-12 pages), and a final exam. Graduates may sit for the mid-term, but will be predominately evaluated through a graduate level research/analysis essay modeled on the standard article in the discipline.

   

Course ID: ENG445

Course Title: STUDIES IN 21ST CENTURY NONFICTION

Section: 1

CRN: 37776

Instructor Name: Passarello, Elena

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 334

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1200

End Time: 1320

Course Description: This course examines innovations in 21st century nonfiction through a particular lens: that of the book-length essay. While many might describe the essay as a short-form enterprise, the past two decades have seen a significant uptick in writers and publishers releasing prose works of over 30,000 words and labeling them essays. These books are often genre-bending, innovative, and wonderfully tricky. But why call them essays? This class will ask that question of seven texts by authors including Amy Fusselman, Shawn Wen, John D’Agata, and Claudia Rankine, looking for commonalities, definitive moments, and noteworthy leaps toward a new artistic tradition. Students should prepare for a lively, discussion-focused class with several short writing assignments, creative opportunities and, for the graduates, a group presentation.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WIC

   

Course ID: ENG454

Course Title: MAJOR AUTHORS: DANTE

Section: 1

CRN: 39271

Instructor Name: Anderson, Wayne C.

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 332

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 900

End Time: 950

Course Description: In this class we’ll spend ten weeks just trying to figure out what’s going on in The Divine Comedy and what the main themes are.  We won’t be interpreting it so much as just trying to see it, and the poem itself will help us do that. The Comedy is the sort of work that teaches us how to read it, first in the character of Dante, in his reactions and questions as he goes through, and then in the figure of Virgil, who is always instructing him.  We’ll join with Dante the character, relying as well on the notes in John Ciardi’s great translation. We’ll spend most of our time in the famous cantos of the Inferno, but we’ll also spend a fair amount of time in the Purgatorio and the Paradiso, noticing all the parallels and symmetries, because unless we read the Inferno in the context of the rest of the poem, we just get it wrong.  The work: three essays in the form of prose “cantos” describing your journey down, and then up, as well as three exams emphasizing scenic and plot details. This is a great poem, and it’s great fun to read in a group, with other people. I guess that’s my main course objective: to show you how much fun hell is, once you get the hang of it. What tremendous play. Text: John Ciardi, trans., The Divine Comedy.

   

Course ID: FILM125

Course Title: INTRO TO FILM STUDIES: 1945-PRESENT

Section: 1

CRN: 36584

Instructor Name: Lewis, Jon R.

Location: Owen Hall

Room: 101

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1400

End Time: 1520

Film Screenings: M 1800-2150 Owen Hall 101

Course Description: This class offers a cultural history of American and European cinema from 1942-1967.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts, West Culture

   

Course ID: FILM220

Course Title: TOPICS: AFRICA IN CINEMA

Section: 2

CRN: 39903

Instructor Name: Osagie, Iyunolu F.

Location: Owen Hall

Room: 101

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1400

End Time: 1450

Course Description: This course introduces students to the study of images of Africa. We will start the class by exploring what has been termed “Hollywood’s Africa”: depictions of Africa and Africans in Hollywood and Hollywood-style films. Also, this class will examine cinematic images that African artists have produced about themselves and about the world. Issues such as the unequal distribution of power, economic disempowerment, race, class, and gender conflict, aesthetics as social and political currency will be addressed. This discussion-oriented class uses the cinematic medium to establish a community of engaged critical thinkers. Students are expected to participate actively in class and to write analyses of the films. Please note that some films may have subtitles.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Diff/Power/Disc

   

Course ID: FILM220

Course Title: TOPICS: SEXUALITY IN FILM

Section: 1

CRN: 39266

Instructor Name: St Jacques, Jillian

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 206

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 900

End Time: 950

Course Description: Participants in FILM 220 concentrate on articulating their own viewpoints concerning the social construction and distribution of difference, power and discrimination in contemporary cinema. By closely analyzing the ways in which an array of films depict sexualities for multifarious political and libidinal ends, participants evaluate the intersection of sex, class, race and age through a variety of genres, nationalities and periods. Beginning with films that centralize tropes of heterosexual normalcy, students evaluate films such as Thelma & Louise, Brokeback Mountain, Ma Vie en Rose and Boys Don’t Cry. Along with learning to closely read films, students make connections with diverse and sometimes oppositional critical theories, including but not limited to psychoanalytic, feminist, (post)feminist, post-structural and queer theories. This transdisciplinary mélange serves as a basis for research, writing, group discussion and personal reflection.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Diff/Power/Disc

   

Course ID: FILM245

Course Title: THE NEW AMERICAN CINEMA

Section: 400

CRN:  36223

Instructor Name: Rust, Stephen A.

Location: Ecampus

Course Description: This class will attend post-rating system Hollywood (1968-present) by closely examining the important films and filmmakers of the period along with key events in the business of developing, producing, distributing, and exhibiting motion pictures.  There are no prerequisites for this course; however, please keep in mind that this is an ambitious 200-level academic course, not a film appreciation class.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

   

Course ID: FILM255

Course Title: WORLD CINEMA I: ORIGINS-1968

Section: 1

CRN: 37803

Instructor Name: Zuo, Mila

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 334

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1400

End Time: 1520

Film Screenings: W 1800-2150 Owen Hall 101

Course Description: The 1960s, referred to as the “Long Decade” because of its lasting impacts, was an exciting time for cinema. Post-war atmospheres, revolutionary politics, and new technologies kindled experimentation with film form, genre, and style. Surveying national cinemas of the 60s throughout the Americas, Europe, and Asia, this course explores the development of modern cinemas by focusing on the period’s most influential and remarkable filmmakers and film movements. New cinemas of this era were often in dialogue with one another, and we examine film as a global phenomenon that developed within diverse historical and industrial contexts. Capaciously approaching “revolution” through politics, as well as aesthetics and forms, we study film’s social praxis and the possibilities of innovative disruption. In this introductory course, students will be equipped with foundational tools with which to critically engage with cinema as artistic form, political object, and commercial artifact.

Special topic: Revolutionary Cinemas of the 1960s

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

   

Course ID: FILM265

Course Title: FILMS FOR THE FUTURE

Section: 1

CRN: 37050

Instructor Name: Lewis, Jon R.

Location: Darkside Cinema

Day: R

Begin Time: 1600

End Time: 1850

Film Screenings: W 1800-2150 Owen Hall 101

Course Description: If thinking about the future makes you nervous, here’s some food for thought (and worry). This class offers a survey of futurist films and literature from Georges Melies’ 1902 adaptation of Jules Verne’s A Trip to the Moon through last year’s Hulu series The Handmaid’s Tale.

   

Course ID: FILM480

Course Title: STUDIES IN FILM, CULTURE & SOCIETY

Section: 1

CRN: 39275

Instructor Name: Zuo, Mila

Location: Moreland

Room: 330

Day: T

Begin Time: 1600

End Time: 1950

Film Screening: R 1800-2150 Learning Innovation Center 368

Course Description:  “Star Bodies in Cinema and Media” critically analyzes celebrity, stardom, and mediated performance. Why and how are some bodies privileged to become spectacular representatives of the human species in screen cultures? How do stars generate cultures of belonging (and exclusion) for audiences and spectators? How do gender, race and ethnicity, and class become articulated through the technologies of the celebrity body? What kinds of theories and frameworks enable us to critically discuss issues of charisma, appearance, and presence? Throughout the course we interrogate the structures of desire and fascination that determine our relationship to public bodies by screening key films and media texts that have helped launch actors/personalities to stardom and into our collective imaginations. In this course, we pursue a methodology of reading the body as a kind of text (our own, as well as the star body) while examining notions of visual pleasure and “the gaze,” affect, and reception as they pertain to our imagined contact with celebrity bodies.

Special topic: Star Bodies in Cinema and Media

   

Course ID: WR121

Course Title: ENGLISH COMPOSITION

See the Course Catalog for available sections.

Course Description: WR 121 is designed to help students develop skills and confidence in analytical writing. It also emphasizes rhetorical awareness—the perception of where, how, and why persuasion is occurring. This section offers the unique opportunity for collaboration with the Valley Library’s Special Collections and Archives Research Center. Students will engage directly with materials from the University’s collections in the process of writing a high-quality, researched academic essay. Assignments and in-class activities will emphasize and explore the process of writing, including acts of reading, researching, analytical thinking, freewriting, drafting, review, revision, and editing.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Writing I

   

Course ID: WR201

Course Title: WRITING FOR MEDIA

Section: 4

CRN: 32670

Instructor Name: Elbom, Emily R.

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 206

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1300

End Time: 1350

Course Description: WR201 Writing for Media introduces students to reporting news across traditional and new media forms. Students compose stories in newspaper, radio, broadcast, blog, digital reporting and multimedia styles. The course requires students to conduct interviews, compile research, and turn in publishable articles by deadline.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

   

Course ID: WR201

Course Title: WRITING FOR MEDIA

Section: 400

CRN: 38307

Instructor Name: St Jacques, Jillian

Location: Ecampus

Course Description: WR201 Writing for Media introduces students to reporting news across traditional and new media forms. Students compose stories in newspaper, radio, broadcast, blog, digital reporting and multimedia styles. The course requires students to conduct interviews, compile research, and turn in publishable articles by deadline. The final assignment in this course (the multimedia package), is a group assignment and will require scheduling time outside of class for its completion.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

   

Course ID: WR201

Course Title: WRITING FOR MEDIA

Section: 2

CRN: 31353

Instructor Name: Strini, Tom

Location: Hovland Hall

Room: 100

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 900

End Time: 950

Course Description: In WR 201 Writing for Media, students learn basic journalist skills and practice, including interviewing, fact gathering, writing on deadline, inverted pyramid and narrative structures, and lede styles. With special emphasis on online publishing and building readership and on how journalistic skills apply to other fields.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

   

Course ID: WR214

Course Title: BUSINESS WRITING

See the Course Catalog for available sections.

Course Description: Thoughtful and thorough communication across multiple audiences and for multiple purposes continues to be an extremely important skill set in business. Writing in Business helps you build these skills and makes use of different networked technologies, software, and online materials in order to broaden your understanding of where, why, and how writing in the workplace happens. You’ll learn the principles and practices necessary for writing ethical and effective business letters, memos, and reports for a range of professional contexts. WR 214 will also help you present yourself as a professional, research job opportunities, write materials for job applications, and then land the position you want. The work you’ll do in this course is informed by current research in rhetoric and professional writing and is guided by the needs and practices of business, industry, and society at large.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Writing II

   

Course ID: WR222

Course Title: ENGLISH COMPOSITION

See the Course Catalog for available sections.

Course Description: Argument may seem like a simple word; it’s anything but. One look at the title of your textbook supports that claim. Arguments live in everything we see, think and do. They can be as overt as a Presidential debate and as subtle as a paint color. When you start seeing argumentation in this way, the possibilities are endless. As varied as arguments come, there are tried and true constants in the analysis and crafting of their myriad messages. Arguments are conversations. There is more than one voice in the room. They are grounded in the art of persuasion. They succeed and fail on an understanding of audience. In this course, you will learn the basics of what goes into good argumentative writing through extensive reading, analyzing, brain storming, peer reviewing, revising, debating and (of course) writing. You will develop strategies to help you interpret a variety of texts and compose in a variety of media. This course will show you how a sound argument moves, considering structure, support and form. You will improve your ability to revise your ideas, the reasoning that supports those ideas, and the writing that illustrates them.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Writing II

   

Course ID: WR222

Course Title: ENGLISH COMPOSITION-PSYCH

Section: 11

CRN: 39278

Instructor Name: Drummond, Robert J.

Location: Strand Agriculture Hall

Room: 261

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1000

End Time: 1120

Course Description: WR 222 for Psychology Majors. These specialized sections of WR 222 will continue practice in expository writing with an emphasis on argumentation and research specifically for Psychology Majors. (Bacc Core Course) PREREQS: WR 121 [C-] or WR 121H [C-] or Placement Test WWRI(1). Arguments live in everything we see, think, and do. They can be as overt as an intense debate and as subtle as a paint color. As varied as arguments come, there are tried and true constants in the analysis and crafting of their myriad messages. Arguments are grounded in the art of persuasion, and they succeed and fail on an understanding of audience. In this course, you will learn the basics of what goes into good argumentative writing through extensive reading, analyzing, and writing. In addition, this section of WR 222 is specific to Psychology majors; students will gain additional preparation for making arguments in the Psychology major, including writing approaches, research and reading techniques, and APA style.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

   

Course ID: WR222

Course Title: ENGLISH COMPOSITION-PSYCH

Section: 16

CRN: 33551

Instructor Name: Drummond, Robert J.

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 362

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1400

End Time: 1520

Course Description: WR 222 for Psychology Majors. These specialized sections of WR 222 will continue practice in expository writing with an emphasis on argumentation and research specifically for Psychology Majors. (Bacc Core Course) PREREQS: WR 121 [C-] or WR 121H [C-] or Placement Test WWRI(1). Arguments live in everything we see, think, and do. They can be as overt as an intense debate and as subtle as a paint color. As varied as arguments come, there are tried and true constants in the analysis and crafting of their myriad messages. Arguments are grounded in the art of persuasion, and they succeed and fail on an understanding of audience. In this course, you will learn the basics of what goes into good argumentative writing through extensive reading, analyzing, and writing. In addition, this section of WR 222 is specific to Psychology majors; students will gain additional preparation for making arguments in the Psychology major, including writing approaches, research and reading techniques, and APA style.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

   

Course ID: WR224

Course Title: INTRO TO FICTION WRITING

More sections of this course available. See the Course Catalog.

Section: 400

CRN: 32782

Instructor Name: Harrison, Wayne M.

Location: Ecampus

Course Description: This online fiction writing workshop examines the basic techniques of fiction, with related writing exercises. We will discuss literary craft elements that include characterization, significant detail, dialogue, voice, point of view, tone, pacing and setting, as well as figurative language concepts such as symbolism, metaphor and theme. Students will develop a critical vocabulary with which to analyze how successfully fiction meets the expectations of literature. Students will study the work of professional fiction writers and apply the principles of contemporary fiction to their own writing to establish dimensional characters and plotlines, and to create dialogue that is rich and revealing, and exploring  aspects of narrative, point of view, tone, pacing, plot, theme, etc creating and revising a satisfying short story. They will also critique the creative work of their fellow students in weekly peer review workshops. Assessment methods include creative writing exercises, quizzes and reading checks on textbook craft sections, peer review, and the evolution of a short story from rough draft to a 10 page final draft that meets the structural and thematic qualifications of literature.

   

Course ID: WR228

Course Title: WRITING ABROAD

Section: 400

CRN: 39961

Instructor Name: Griffin, Kristin

Location: Ecampus

Course Description: Whether you’re studying abroad now, have just returned from a trip or would like the chance to see your hometown in a new way, brand new Bacc Core Writing II Ecampus offering Writing Abroad will help you develop the travel writing skills you need. Students will learn how to keep field notes of their adventures, how to find compelling stories, and how to create itineraries to their favorite spots with future visitors in mind. We’ll be reading deeply in the travel and lifestyle writing genres online—there is no textbook—and students will have the opportunity to publish in a course-affiliated online magazine. Time you’re spending on the ground, experiencing where you are and all it has to offer, counts towards the course credit hours. It’s research, after all, and the world is your oyster.

   

Course ID: WR230

Course Title: ESSENTIALS OF ENGLISH GRAMMAR

Section: 400

CRN: 39916

Instructor Name: Snyder, Wesley M.

Location: Ecampus

Course Description: This course introduces students to the structure of sentences with a focus on beginning grammar, including explicit understanding of the the rules and terminology of standard grammar, usage, and mechanics. Students in WR 230 will learn the differences between clauses and phrases, how to recognize subjects and predicates, how to avoid the most common grammatical errors, and how to use punctuation correctly—and with intention. Students will complete readings, diagram sentences, participate in discussions, and demonstrate understanding through multiple-choice and short-answer quizzes. Students will also create writing and analyze grammatical choices in a series of discourse analysis projects.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

   

Course ID: WR240

Course Title: INTRO TO NONFICTION WRITING

See the Course Catalog for available sections.

Course Description: Creative nonfiction is the genre of creative writing that bridges the act of making literary prose--the crafting of vivid scenes, a thoughtful narrative voice, and meaningful formats--with the kinds of practical personal writing often required in our academic and professional lives. In this course, we will discuss several published pieces from the creative nonfiction genre, including personal essays, memoir, and lyric essay. More importantly, we will also write, edit, workshop, and revise several pieces of our own creative nonfiction. Expect a lively class with lots of imaginative prompts, free-writes, and hardy discussion.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: WR II

   

Course ID: WR241

Course Title: INTRO TO POETRY WRITING

More sections of this course available. See the Course Catalog.

Section: 400

CRN: 32864

Instructor Name: Roush, Stephanie R.

Location: Ecampus

Course Description: “The art of poetry is ultimately an art of attention—Michael Blumenthal.” Throughout this course, we will consider the tools necessary to approach poetry more attentively as both readers and writers. This course will provide a firm grounding in the rudiments of poetic craft such as word choice, line breaks, imagery, structure, and other devices, as well as an introduction to different forms available to poets. We will consistently work through writing exercises and read/ discuss the work of various poets in order to aid us in the generation of our own poems.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

   

Course ID: WR303

Course Title: WRITING FOR THE WEB

Section: 1

CRN: 37052

Instructor Name: Kelly, Kristy L.

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 334

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1000

End Time: 1050

Course Description: Writing for the Web prepares students to produce instructive, informative, and rhetorically savvy writing for Web-based locations and applications. Web-based writing is often written differently than writing meant for different media, because writing on the Web is more often concerned with helping people find information, get things done, convey their opinions, build communities, and collaborate on complex projects. To achieve success in this course, students must demonstrate knowledge of advanced writing techniques adaptable for numerous networked, multimedia contexts.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

   

Course ID: WR323

Course Title: ENGLISH COMPOSITION

Section: 1

CRN: 39279

Instructor Name: Kelly, Kristy L.

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 334

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1200

End Time: 1250

Course Description: WR 323 is a course about style, or the ways that diction, tone, and structure combine to cultivate a voice and represent a particular view of the world. Students will read extensively, write intensively, and share feedback abundantly when reading classmates’ work. Ultimately, students will hone their own unique approach to the craft of writing, and compose a series of nonfiction essays that illuminate an issue of import to them. This section of WR 323 will investigate the genres of creative and literary nonfiction, with a special emphasis on writing about celebrity and pop culture.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

   

Course ID: WR323

Course Title: ENGLISH COMPOSITION

Section: 400

CRN: 32766

Instructor Name: Peters, Patrick J.

Location: Ecampus

Course Description: Writing and the reading of writing are social processes that encourage the reader to interpret and respond to texts in varied, unique, and often complex ways. Students in WR 323 will be asked to read and respond to the work of others and compose their own texts with a heightened awareness of style, or the way in which language is used to clearly and gracefully articulate one’s own worldview. Students will be challenged to conceive of and develop their own style, focusing on elements of diction, tone, emphasis, shape and clarity.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled:    Core, Skills, WR II

   

Course ID: WR324

Course Title: SHORT STORY WRITING

Section: 1

CRN: 30109

Instructor Name: Rodgers, Susan J.

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 334

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1000

End Time:  1120

Course Description: Prerequisite: WR 224. In this class, we’ll be working in the genre of literary realism. Our focus this term will be on “Changing Your Life”—that is, transforming students’ autobiographical material into fiction. Students will further their understanding of the elements of narrative—plot, point of view, characterization, setting, tone, metaphor, subtext, etc.—both as writers and readers; engage in a range of writing exercises and assignments to help develop an authentic voice, as well as generate material for their own short fiction; and hone critical skills, both written and oral. Requirements include informal writing exercises, 2-3 graded short writing assignments, a short story, analyses of readings, and regular reading quizzes. Students will also participate in small group workshops, and write reviews of their peers’ stories. The instructor will meet with each student in conference at least once during the term.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

   

Course ID: WR324

Course Title: SHORT STORY WRITING

Section: 2

CRN: 39280

Instructor Name: Scribner, Keith T.

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 332

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1600

End Time: 1720

Course Description: In this course we will study the basic elements of fiction—character, dialogue, point of view, tone, and so on—to further develop our understanding of fictional techniques.  Our class will combine reading, writing, and discussion. Assignments will include one full-length short story (7-12 pages), a short short, writing exercises, and written critiques on workshop stories

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

   

Course ID: WR327

Course Title: TECHNICAL WRITING

See the Course Catalog for available sections.

Course Description:    WR 327 will prepare you to produce instructive, informational, and persuasive documents aimed at well-defined and achievable outcomes. Technical documents are precise, concise, and organized, but often based on complex information. However, the purpose and target audience of each document often determines how that information is presented, including writing style, document layout, vocabulary, sentence and paragraph structure, and visuals, among other factors. To this end, this course teaches processes for analyzing writing contexts and producing effective, clean, and reader-centered documents in an efficient manner. Grounded in rhetorical theory, WR 327 presents contemporary research in technical communication and instructs students in current best practices. Individually and in groups, students learn effective strategies for communicating with technology in the modern, networked workplace.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Writing II

   

Course ID: WR327

Course Title: TECHNICAL WRITING-ENGINEERING

Section: 3

CRN: 30151

Instructor Name: Elbom, Emily R.

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 130B

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1100

End Time: 1150

Course Description: In the “Technical Writing for Engineers” sections of WR 327, students use an engineering communication textbook and engage with the course objectives and learning outcomes through engineering-specific activities and assignments. This approach serves two purposes. First, by focusing specifically on principles of effective engineering communication, the course builds proficiency in the kinds of communication practices you will be tasked with both in pro-school and in the engineering workplace. Second, your engagement with fundamental engineering concepts in each of the course assignments will both solidify and extend your repertoire of technical knowledge. In other words, participation in this course not only will help you become a better engineering communicator but will also lead to greater conceptual and technical fluency in your chosen field.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled:    Core, Skills, WR II

   

Course ID: WR327

Course Title: TECHNICAL WRITING-ENGINEERING

Section: 10

CRN: 32008

Instructor Name: Elbom, Emily R.

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 130B

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1400

End Time: 1450

Course Description: In the “Technical Writing for Engineers” sections of WR 327, students use an engineering communication textbook and engage with the course objectives and learning outcomes through engineering-specific activities and assignments. This approach serves two purposes. First, by focusing specifically on principles of effective engineering communication, the course builds proficiency in the kinds of communication practices you will be tasked with both in pro-school and in the engineering workplace. Second, your engagement with fundamental engineering concepts in each of the course assignments will both solidify and extend your repertoire of technical knowledge. In other words, participation in this course not only will help you become a better engineering communicator but will also lead to greater conceptual and technical fluency in your chosen field.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

   

Course ID: WR327

Course Title: TECHNICAL WRITING-ENGINEERING

Section: 16

CRN: 33544

Instructor Name: Halton, Alyssa J.

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 130B

Day: TR

Begin Time: 830

End Time: 950

Course Description: In the “Technical Writing for Engineers” sections of WR 327, students use an engineering communication textbook and engage with the course objectives and learning outcomes through engineering-specific activities and assignments. This approach serves two purposes. First, by focusing specifically on principles of effective engineering communication, the course builds proficiency in the kinds of communication practices you will be tasked with both in pro-school and in the engineering workplace. Second, your engagement with fundamental engineering concepts in each of the course assignments will both solidify and extend your repertoire of technical knowledge. In other words, participation in this course not only will help you become a better engineering communicator but will also lead to greater conceptual and technical fluency in your chosen field.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

   

Course ID: WR330

Course Title: UNDERSTANDING GRAMMAR

Section:1

CRN: 39281

Instructor Name: Tolar Burton, Vicki

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 206

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1200

End Time: 1320

Course Description: WR 330 is an advanced study of traditional grammatical forms and conventional grammatical terms with emphasis on the assumptions underlying the structure of traditional grammar. As a 300-level course, this class will require significant student practice, discussion, and evaluation. In this course, we will study the sentence—its structure, and all the possible ways to create one. We’ll gain the vocabulary to discuss language; we’ll read and demonstrate comprehension of relevant theory, concepts, and techniques for understanding grammatically correct communication; and we’ll develop appreciation of language, form, and style. You will learn through reading assignments, homework completion, class discussions, various guided activities, discourse analysis projects, quizzes, and an exam. Completing all assignments will be essential for your success in this course.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

   

Course ID: WR340

Course Title: CREATIVE NON-FICTION

Section: 1

CRN: 39902

Instructor Name: Passarello, Elena

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 334

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1400

End Time: 1520

Course Description: Writing 340 is OSU’s intermediate creative writing course in creative nonfiction: personal essays, memoirs, travel narratives, and lyric essays. Any student who has taken a 200-level creative writing course is welcome to join the group. In class, we will draft, workshop, and discuss three polished pieces of creative nonfiction, while discussing some of the most noteworthy published essays of the past twenty years. Expect a lively, vibrant class with a diverse reading list that prepares you to write about the world in many capacities, with lots of creative and professional applications!

   

Course ID: WR341

Course Title: ADVANCED POETRY WRITING

Section: 1

CRN: 34753

Instructor Name: Biespiel, David

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 206

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1000

End Time: 1120

Course Description: Writing 341 is the university’s intermediate creative writing course in poetry, with special emphasis on writing new poems from a variety of approaches. Any student who has taken a 200-level creative writing course is welcome to join the workshop. In class, we will sketch lines and images for new poems, discuss student writing by focusing on its strengths, and discuss noteworthy published poems of the last fifty years. In a time when people are looking for ways to reengage with their inner lives, to speak to concerns of social and intimate issues, expect this class to be exciting and diverse. Special Focus: Making new metaphors for the 21st century. Final project to include a portfolio of poems and sketch book.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

   

Course ID: WR353

Course Title: WRITING ABOUT PLACES

Section: 400

CRN: 38220

Instructor Name: Fearnside, Jeff

Location: Ecampus

Course Description: In order to communicate effectively with others, we must understand not only where they come from but where we come from. This course is designed to help in that understanding, using place not only to ground us in our mutually entwined dialogues but to provide a jumping off point into new explorations of other places and selves, including our many own. Utilizing personal experience and research, students study, discuss, and practice the conventions of writing about place from a global and local perspective for various audiences. Involves reading contemporary authors of place-based writing, informal and formal writing assignments, research assignments, lectures, group and online activities, and a final portfolio.

   

Course ID: WR362

Course Title: SCIENCE WRITING

Section: 400

CRN: 33794

Instructor Name: Snyder, Wesley M.

Location: Ecampus

Course Description: In this course, we’ll study the practice and conventions for writing about and communicating science to a broader public of non-professionals. We’ll read and analyze some of the best and most influential science journalism from the past few years and see what makes that writing successful, before we write our own news pieces and feature articles, paying attention to both print and digital outlets for that work. While the course addresses some of the more practical skills involved in writing about complex scientific information, we’ll also learn about the models of science communication that support that work. We’ll work on some writing projects together, as an entire class, though all students will have the opportunity to pursue their specific areas of scientific interest – and investigate fields in which OSU excels. Reading and writing assignments have been designed to help students gain greater insight into the issues and challenges of science writing in a variety of contexts.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

   

Course ID: WR362H

Course Title: SCIENCE WRITING

Section: 1

CRN: 39179

Instructor Name: Pflugfelder, Ehren H.

Location: LINC

Room: 343

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1100

End Time: 1150

Course Description: In WR 362, Science Writing, we’ll study the practice and conventions for writing about science to a broader public of non-professionals. We’ll read and analyze some of the best and most influential science journalism from the past few years and see what makes that writing successful, before we write our own news pieces and feature articles, paying attention to both print and digital outlets for that work. While the course addresses some of the more practical skills involved in writing about complex scientific information, we’ll also learn about the models of science communication that support that work. We’ll work on some writing projects together, as an entire class, though all students will have the opportunity to pursue their specific areas of scientific interest – and investigate fields in which OSU excels. Reading and writing assignments have been designed to help students gain greater insight into the issues and challenges of science writing in a variety of contexts.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: WR II

   

Course ID: WR383

Course Title: FOOD WRITING

Section: 1

CRN: 35656

Instructor Name: Griffin, Kristin

Location: Strand Agriculture Hall

Room: 211

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1000

End Time: 1120

Course Description: From the recipe to the memoir essay, the investigative feature to the food crawl, this course will expose you to the booming world of food writing. We’ll discuss the classics in American food writing and read deeply in what’s current, from personal blogs like Smitten Kitchen to online magazines like Serious Eats to print magazines like Saveur. Once you have a sense of the genre and its possibilities, each student will become writer, editor, and designer of a new issue of Buckteeth Magazine, an online food magazine associated with the class and produced collaboratively over the course of the term. You’ll assign yourself a food-focused story, learn effective strategies for pitching it, and hone your revision skills, earning yourself a spot on the masthead and a publication for your resume.

   

Course ID: WR414

Course Title: ADVERTISING & PUBLIC RELATIONS WRITING

Section:  1

CRN: 36586

Instructor Name: St Jacques, Jillian

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 206

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1400

End Time: 1450

Course Description:  Consider the rhetoric of contemporary advertising, from its high-end TV

commercials to blatant spam and pay per click pop-ups. Now, consider the use of rhetorics in public relations campaigns; tactfully poised messages designed to remedy crisis situations or promote goodwill. Although these two fields might seem worlds apart, advertising and public relations share a deeply intrinsic task: deploying rhetorical skills to persuade, convince and motivate target audiences to take a desired action. To achieve this aim,  professionals in advertising and public relations must be adept at writing in any media form that conveys a message plausibly and expediently. Through assembling and critiquing two multi-document portfolios – the advertising campaign and the press kit – WR414 participants hone skills at writing for advertising and public relations in a saturated media marketplace.
   

Course ID: WR420

Course Title: WRITING WOMEN’S LIVES

Section: 400

CRN: 35531

Instructor Name: Detar, Liddy

Location: Ecampus

Course Description:  How can we transform our lives from lived experience into written texts of many different forms: from autobiography, memoir, poetry, fiction to personal essays and academic writing? While challenging the very category of “woman,” this course explores what moves us to write the stories of our lives or someone else’s and how questions of genre and form are related to the stores we need to tell – and the narratives we must resist, about ourselves and our communities. In addition to reading great memoirs, this course includes BOTH creative and critical projects designed to support a personal practice of memoir writing.

   

Course ID: WR424

Course Title: ADVANCED FICTION WRITING

Section: 400

CRN: 34954

Instructor Name: Larison, John J.

Location: Ecampus

Course Description: Welcome to Advanced Fiction Writing, a course that will delve into the subtle mechanics behind compelling, moving, and thematically important fiction.  Though our readings this term will focus on short novels, the lessons taught will apply equally well to short stories and long novels. This term, we’ll be focusing our inquiries on issues of belief, character, structure, dialogue, and endings.  Also, we’ll begin to better define the process of revision used by professional writers. This section of WR 424 will include guided readings of published work, workshop, and regular writing and commenting.

   

Course ID: WR424

Course Title: ADVANCED FICTION WRITING

Section: 1

CRN: 36587

Instructor Name: Sandor, Marjorie J.

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 334

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1600

End Time: 1720

Course Description: In this advanced fiction writing-course, students will study and practice the art of writing short fiction, working from a series of short exercises into a full-length story over the course of the term. We’ll also explore literary craft through professional short stories and a book called “Reading Like a Writer.” Our sessions will involve the discussion and rigorous written and oral critique of student writing, along with weekly written analyses of published short fiction from the 19th century to the present moment.

   

Course ID: WR441

Course Title: ADVANCED POETRY WRITING

Section: 1

CRN: 36585

Instructor Name: Biespiel, David

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 206

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1000

End Time:  1120

Course Description: Writing 441 is the university’s advanced creative writing course in poetry, with special emphasis on writing and critiquing new poems from a variety of approaches. Any student who has taken a 300-level creative writing course is welcome to join the workshop. In class, we will sketch lines and images for new poems, discuss student writing by focusing on its strengths, and discuss noteworthy published poems of the last fifty years. In a time when people are looking for ways to reengage with their inner lives, to speak to concerns of social and intimate issues, expect this class to be exciting and diverse. Special Focus: Making new metaphors for the 21st century. Final project to include a portfolio of poems and sketch book and class presentations on one contemporary poet.

   

Course ID: WR462

Course Title: ENVIRONMENTAL WRITING

Section: 1

CRN: 37810

Instructor Name: Jensen, Tim

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 362

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1000

End Time: 1120

Course Description: From early conservationism to monkey-wrenching to deep ecology to climate science to indigenous rhetorics—this class will journey through a forest of diverse voices, while also journeying through actual forests (with waterproof notebooks in tow). We’ll explore how environmental issues get communicated—and why that matters—by reading works from leading-edge environmental writers, tracing histories of environmental writing in America, and by composing our own works along the way. We’ll learn how conceptions of nature, earth, and sustainability get shaped through communication and practice techniques for reshaping them through creative and critical compositions.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WIC

   

Course ID: WR475

Course Title: RHETORICS OF RACE

Section: 1

CRN: 39282

Instructor Name: Ribero, Ana M.

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 330

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1000

End Time: 1120

Course Description: By exploring the interrelated concepts of race, racialization, and racism, Rhetorics of Race problematizes race as a taken-for-granted phenomenon. Through reading, writing, and discussion, we study racial formations as historically specific and analyze contemporary forms of racism in the US. As rhetoricians, we pay close attention to how rhetoric and discourse have the power to reproduce and challenge white supremacy and race-based oppressions. Emphasizing the intersectionality of oppression—that racism necessarily takes place at intersections with other forms of subordination including sexism, homophobia, ablelism, etc.—Rhetorics of Race draws from Queer Black Feminism, Chican@ Feminism, and Critical Race Theory.  

   

Course ID: WR495

Course Title: INTRO TO LITERACY STUDIES

Section: 1

CRN: 39283

Instructor Name: Helle, Anita

Location: Moreland Hall

Room: 330

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1200

End Time: 1320

Course Description: This class introduces the field of literacy studies. The class approaches literacy from historical, cultural, and critical perspectives, seeking to question dominant narratives about literacy and to unveil the ways such narratives are implicated in common practices of schooling, colonization, gendering, and racialization. Students will read, write about and discuss definitions of literacy and literacy narratives--fictional and non-fictional accounts of the importance of reading and writing in ordinary and extraordinary lives. The class is organized chronologically and by critical moments of “transition” in the history of literacy, past and present, with particular emphasis on histories of reading and reading/writing connections