Schedule of Classes:

 

Course Descriptions:
Applied Journalism

 

Course Descriptions:
English
Course Descriptions:
Film
Course Descriptions:
Writing
2018-2019 Catalog
NEW!

AJ 300

 

ENG 100 Level
ENG 200 Level
ENG 300 Level
ENG 400 Level

 

FILM 200 Level
FILM 400 Level
WR 100 Level
WR 200 Level
WR 300 Level
WR 400 Level
         

Looking for graduate course descriptions? Find them here.

Download the PDF version of this term's course descriptions here.

 

 

NEW! Apply this course to the Applied Journalism minor!

Course ID: AJ311

Course Title: MEDIA STORYTELLING

Section: 1

CRN: 19660

Instructor Name: St. Jacques, Jillian

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 206

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1400

End Time: 1450

Course Description: A good story lies at the heart of any journalistic enterprise -- but in today's digital culture, stand-alone text is not often the final destination. Participants in AJ311 Media Storytelling create a series of meticulously crafted multimedia packages on real-time regional events, concentrating from the outset on identifying the narrative relationship between visual media and text. Using video, audio, photography, graphics and other elements to activate media storytelling, students will submit a series of multimedia feature stories to online critique galleries for evaluation, and will be encouraged to submit their final copy to OSU’s Orange Media Network and other campus outlets for publication. Interpersonal communication skills, the ability to work in team scenarios, an eye for ruthless editing in Associated Press Style and the application of group critique to final copy are vital to the successful completion of this course.

 

Course ID: ENG104

Course Title: INTRO TO LITERATURE: FICTION

Section: 402

CRN: 17732

Instructor Name: TBD

Building: ECAMPUS

Course Description: What is a story, and why do stories matter? In this course we will read, think about, write about, and discuss a wide variety of short stories, representing a wide variety of forms, styles, and contexts, and we'll learn to look at short fiction through a critical lens. Participation in class discussions and guided reading responses make up a significant part of your grade. The quizzes you'll take will gauge reading completion and comprehension. Exploratory assignments will allow you to consider aspects of the form from an active learning mindset. All of our work this term will require us to think critically about written narratives.

 

Course ID: ENG104

Course Title: INTRO TO LITERATURE: FICTION

Section: 1

CRN: 10217

Instructor Name: Bushnell, John T.

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 330

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1400

End Time: 1450

Course Description: This course will introduce you to prose fiction through the short story and novel, with particular (but not exclusive) focus on American writers from the last century. You will learn to read closely for fundamental craft concepts such as characterization, conflict, point of view, structure, symbolism, and theme. You will also be asked to think critically about the ideas and issues you encounter. By the end of the term, you will have received exposure to a broad array of narratives, cultures, and ideas, and will have developed the skills to analyze them for meaning and value.

 

Course ID: ENG104

Course Title: INTRO TO LITERATURE: FICTION

Section: 2

CRN: 10218

Instructor Name: Davison, Neil R.

Building:

MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 330

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 900

End Time: 950

Course Description:This course will introduce the student to the structural and thematic rudiments of narrative prose fiction and the concepts of both critical interpretation and contextual analysis through the study of the short story genre. We will learn and practice the skill of close reading so as to conduct character, structural, symbol, and linguistic analyses toward the drawing of major thematic inferences. The class will read a series of late-19th and 20th century short stories, examining the texts and their respective historical, cultural, and philosophical contexts as entrances into forming interpretive arguments about the meanings and implications of each story. Students will be evaluated through a series of weekly quizzes and essay-question in-class midterm and final examinations.

 

Course ID: ENG104

Course Title: INTRO TO LITERATURE: FICTION

Section: 3

CRN: 10219

Instructor Name: Elbom, Gilad

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 330

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1600

End Time: 1720

Course Description: Through a close reading of influential works of fiction, this class will explore a variety of literary elements: setting, characters, plot, conflict, motives, emotions, language, style, themes, point of view, and other techniques, devices, and components. We will discuss the conventions of fiction, observe innovative modes of writing, and examine fiction in larger contexts: historical, comparative, structural, theological, modernist, postmodern, psychological, philosophical, feminist, postcolonial, and so on. We will begin with a selection of short stories and end with a famous novel: Mist by Miguel de Unamuno, a tragicomic romance that illuminates the mechanisms of fiction and raises interesting questions about reality and the imagination, God and humanity, author and authorship, and the interplay of writers, fictitious characters, and readers. We will also watch visual narratives that explore some of the basic elements of fiction.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Literature and the Arts

 

Course ID: ENG104

Course Title: INTRO TO LITERATURE: FICTION

Section: 6

CRN: 14203

Instructor Name: Elbom, Gilad

Building: WGND- Wiegand Hall

Room: 132

Day: TR

Begin Time: 830

End Time: 950

Course Description: Through a close reading of influential works of fiction, this class will explore a variety of literary elements: setting, characters, plot, conflict, motives, emotions, language, style, themes, point of view, and other techniques, devices, and components. We will discuss the conventions of fiction, observe innovative modes of writing, and examine fiction in larger contexts: historical, comparative, structural, theological, modernist, postmodern, psychological, philosophical, feminist, postcolonial, and so on. We will begin with a selection of short stories and end with a famous novel: Mist by Miguel de Unamuno, a tragicomic romance that illuminates the mechanisms of fiction and raises interesting questions about reality and the imagination, God and humanity, author and authorship, and the interplay of writers, fictitious characters, and readers. We will also watch visual narratives that explore some of the basic elements of fiction.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Literature and the Arts

 

Course ID: ENG104

Course Title: INTRO TO LITERATURE: FICTION

Section: 400

CRN: 13775

Instructor Name: Harrison, Wayne M.

Building: ECAMPUS

Course Description: This introductory course will examine literary fiction in the novel and short story form from the perspective of a fiction writer. Students will develop a critical vocabulary with which to analyze how successfully the assigned authors have fulfilled the expectations of literary fiction. Craft discussions will focus on literary elements that include characterization, significant detail, dialogue, voice, point of view, and setting, as well as figurative language concepts such as symbolism, metaphor and theme. Students will develop a critical vocabulary with which to analyze how successfully the assigned authors have fulfilled the expectations of literary fiction. Required reading will include two contemporary novels and two collections of contemporary short stories. The voices are wide ranging and represent a good sample of contemporary literature. Course work will include a mid-term and final exam, three quizzes and weekly reading checks.

 

Course ID: ENG104

Course Title: INTRO TO LITERATURE: FICTION

Section: 5

CRN: 11850

Instructor Name: Scribner, Keith T.

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 330

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1500

End Time: 1550

Course Description: In this course we’ll read short stories and two novels. As we proceed through the term, our focus will be on close reading and how these works achieve aesthetic and emotional effect through fictional craft elements, such as plot, character, setting, voice, structure, and symbolism. Course outcomes will include developing skills in textual analysis, close reading, and critical thinking and writing. We’ll examine these works for their historical, literary, social, and political significance, as well as their varying styles and themes, keeping in mind that they are first and foremost works of art.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Literature and the Arts

 

Course ID: ENG106

Course Title: INTRO TO LITERATURE: POETRY

Section: 3

CRN: 15030

Instructor Name: Biespiel, David

Building: WGND- Wiegand Hall

Room: 132

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1200

End Time: 1320

Course Description: For centuries the reading and discussion of poetry has been required learning for an educated person. Not only that, there are many people throughout the world who reads poems frequently, even daily. To read poems for ten weeks in EN 106 with a group of fellow students from across the university, students with diverse majors and life experiences, is to participate in the highest ideals of your liberal arts education. It is to pursue appreciation for the basic human experience of metaphor and to enjoy thinking imaginatively, critically, and creatively for its own sake. EN 106 is less about solving the meaning of poems and more about exploring the questions of life that poems enter (and looking at how poems do that, too). With focus on the experiences of poems, poets, and readers, with focus on the public and private lives that poems explore, with focus on the pleasures of the arrangement of language and metaphor, and with focus on the cultural, social, political, and spiritual subjects that poems explore, students in EN 106 study the study of poetry.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Literature and the Arts

 

Course ID: ENG106

Course Title: INTRO TO LITERATURE: POETRY

Section: 400

CRN: 14314

Instructor Name: TBD

Building: ECAMPUS

Course Description: What is poetry, and why does poetry matter? In this class, we will read, think about, write about, and discuss a wide variety of poems, and we’ll begin to look at poetry through a critical lens. Participation in class discussions and completion of exploratory assignments and guided reading responses make up a significant part of your grade. Activities, quizzes and a final exam allow you to illuminate the understanding you’ve gained.

 

Course ID: ENG106

Course Title: INTRO TO LITERATURE: POETRY

Section: 2

CRN: 13622

Instructor Name: Gottlieb, Evan

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 330

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1100

End Time: 1150

Course Description: This is a broad introduction to the study of poetry. For most of the course, we'll read poems from some of the greatest poets in the English language, from before Shakespeare to the contemporary. Our final unit will take up a recent volume of poetry by a living American poet. Throughout, we'll learn to read poetry for both enjoyment and understanding, focusing in particular on key poetic traditions (the sonnet, rhyme and meter, imagery) while also looking at how these traditions evolve and change over time.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Literature and the Arts

Special Topic: Tradition and Experimentation

 

Course ID: ENG107

Course Title: INTRO TO CREATIVE NONFICTION

Section: 1

CRN: 15542

Instructor Name: Passarello, Elena

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 330

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1300

End Time: 1350

This course, which fulfills the “Literature and the Arts” requirement, covers over a millennium of the literary personal essay, looking as far back as ancient Rome and up to today’s graphic literature. Our guiding question for these ten weeks will be “what is a literary essay?” and we will note how the texts we read )from James Baldwin, Joan Didion, David Foster Wallace, Sei Shonagon, and more) differ from the non-literary essays we may have encountered in other parts of our education. We will examine over a dozen texts to locate the ways a personal essayist’s specific attention to form, scene, and commentary contribute to reader experience and to our understanding of the “facts” of our world.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Literature and the Arts

 

Course ID: ENG200

Course Title: LIBRARY SKILLS FOR LITERARY STUDY

Section: 2

CRN: 12575

Instructor Name: McElroy, Kelly E.

Building: VLIB- The Valley Library

Room: 2082

Day: W

Begin Time: 1000

End Time: 1050

Course Description: This course provides an overview of library skills including search strategies, specific tools such as databases, and citation using MLA 8th edition.

 

Course ID: ENG201

Course Title: SHAKESPEARE

Section: 2

CRN: 17803

Instructor Name: Olson, Rebecca R.

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 330

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1000

End Time: 1050

Course Description: An introduction to the first half of Shakespeare’s dramatic career (the Elizabethan period), with attention to the playwright’s continued global influence. This course is designed to help students become confident readers of Shakespeare’s language, articulate the significance of aural and visual elements of Shakespearean scripts, and analyze the plays in light of specific cultural and historical contexts, both early modern and contemporary. Plays include Richard III, Romeo and Juliet, The Merchant of Venice, and Hamlet. The course is included in two Baccalaureate Core categories: Western Culture and Literature and the Arts.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Literature and the Arts, Western Culture

*Pre-1800

 

Course ID: ENG204

Course Title: SURV BRIT LIT: BEGIN TO 1660

Section: 1

CRN: 10226

Instructor Name: Bude, Tekla

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 332

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1400

End Time: 1450

Course Description: This course is an introduction to English literature from its beginnings through Chaucer and Shakespeare. From Anglo-Saxon riddles and charms to bawdy fabliaux, from travel narratives to sonnets and the rise of professional theater, this course will survey nearly a thousand years of English literary forms in their political, cultural, and artistic contexts, with an eye to understanding how premodern literature and language shaped the course of history. In 800 CE, England was merely a loose conglomeration of small kingdoms, a backwater in the North Atlantic fighting to survive against Viking invaders. By 1660, the English Empire was a growing colonial power internally fragmented by political and religious dissent. What was literature in this early period of English history, and how did its definition, power, and use change over time? What did it mean to read? What relationship did early English literature have to music, the visual arts, and scientific thought? How did English literature create the idea of an English nation?

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Western Culture, Literature and the Arts

*Pre-1800

 

Course ID: ENG210

Course Title: LITS OF THE WORLD: ASIA

Section: 400

CRN: 17131

Instructor Name: Fearnside, Jeff

Building: ECAMPUS

Course Description: Utilizing multiple perspectives—cultural, geographical, historical, linguistic, political, religious, structural, stylistic, thematic, and other points of view—students read, discuss, analyze, and write about representative works of fiction, both short and long forms, from Asia, with a special emphasis on the literatures of countries along the historic Silk Road. Texts will be examined in a comparative context and analyses expanded with the help of secondary sources. Involves reading modern and contemporary authors, formal writing assignments involving research, lectures, moderated discussions, and online activities.

 

Course ID: ENG211

Course Title: LITS OF THE WORLD: AFRICA

Section: 1

CRN: 18665

Instructor Name: Osagie, Iyunolu F.

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 330

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1200

End Time: 1320

Course Description: This course introduces students to a variety of genres in precolonial, colonial, and postcolonial African Literature: drama, fiction, the short story, the oral tradition, and poetry. Through a close reading of primary texts and an examination of applicable critical works, we will reflect on the economic, social, and political impact of the colonial encounter between Africa and Europe. Western imperialism manifests in what can be called "the colonial condition," that is, an internal logic and perception of the other in the relationship between the colonizer and the colonized. Our goal is to frame, analytically, African literary output in light of the body of knowledge produced and or circumscribed by the relationship between Africa and the West. No prior knowledge of African Literature is needed.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Cultural diversity

 

Course ID: ENG213

Course Title: LITS OF THE WORLD: MIDEAST

Section: 1

CRN: 17804

Instructor Name: Elbom, Gilad

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 332

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1000

End Time: 1120

Course Description: This class will focus on modern Middle Eastern literature from multiple perspectives: cultural, political, religious, historical, geographical, linguistic, structural, stylistic, thematic, comparative, and other points of view. The texts on our reading list include a feminist Egyptian novel, innovative Hebrew poetry from Israel, and a postmodern Palestinian novel. Among the topics we will discuss are different languages and dialects of the Middle East, different national and cultural categories, and the idea that the distinctions between these categories are often fluid and dynamic. We will also try to establish connections between Middle Eastern narratives and global cultural and intellectual ideas.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Literature and the Arts; Cultural Diversity

 

Course ID: ENG222

Course Title: CHILDREN'S LITERATURE

Section: 1

CRN: 20062

Instructor Name: Ward, Megan

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 330

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1400

End Time: 1520

Course Description: The late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries are usually referred to as the “golden age” of children’s literature; this is the first time a body of literature was written and published exclusively for children. Critics contend that we are now in a second “golden age” of children’s literature as children’s or young adult (YA) literature tackles complex contemporary issues such as race, religion, and gender. This term, we’ll read poetry, fiction, memoirs, and periodicals from both “golden ages” in order to examine the different forms of children’s literature, the changing notion of the child, and how children’s literature represents modern questions.

 

Course ID: ENG253

Course Title: SURV OF AMER LIT: COL-1900

Section: 1

CRN: 15136

Instructor Name: Osagie, Iyunolu F.

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 334

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1400

End Time: 1520

Course Description: This course introduces students to a body of works known as early American literature and covers works from about the 17th to the 19th century. We will pay close attention to how the ideologies of “an American identity” were formulated and contested through diverse voices and experiences by covering genres such as travel writings, settler narratives, sermons, poetry, slave narratives, political writings, maritime literature, fiction, short stories, drama, and history. We will also examine the dynamics of early environmental writings and their implications in the policies and politics of land appropriation, capitalism, labor, the Enlightenment, and American exceptionalism.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Western culture Lit and the Arts

*Pre-1800

 

Course ID: ENG253

Course Title: SURV OF AMER LIT: COL-1900

Section: 1

CRN: 15136

Instructor Name: Osagie, Iyunolu F.

Building:

MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 334

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1400

End Time: 1520

Course Description: This course introduces students to a body of works known as early American literature and covers works from about the 17th to the 19th century. We will pay close attention to how the ideologies of “an American identity” were formulated and contested through diverse voices and experiences by covering genres such as travel writings, settler narratives, sermons, poetry, slave narratives, political writings, maritime literature, fiction, short stories, drama, and history. We will also examine the dynamics of early environmental writings and their implications in the policies and politics of land appropriation, capitalism, labor, the Enlightenment, and American exceptionalism.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Western culture Lit and the Arts

*Pre-1800

 

Course ID: ENG253

Course Title: SURV OF AMER LIT: COL-1900

Section: 2

CRN: 19031

Instructor Name: Sheehan, Elizabeth M.

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 330

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1000

End Time: 1120

Course Description: This class examines literature written before 1900 that observes, imagines, reacts to, and shapes life in and near what is now the United States of America. The class covers a lot of textual and cultural ground, beginning with indigenous stories of nature and community and concluding with texts that respond to the dynamics of race, gender, nation, and empire at the dawn of the twentieth century. Along the way, we also will consider accounts of colonial contact, conquest, and resistance; slave narratives and early American ideas about the self; poems about religious devotion, the natural world, and freedom; and tales that describe and imagine the cultural, economic, and political forces that shape American individuals, communities, and places. Key questions for the course include: how do indigenous tales offer different ideas of time and space than colonial narratives? How do slavery, race, and gender shape experiences, stories, and concepts of America and its occupants? How might writers immerse themselves in nature in order to discover the possibility of a self? In addition to introducing students to early American literary texts, this course is designed to teach vital skills for written and verbal literary analysis, including close reading.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Western Culture, Literature and the Arts

 

Course ID: ENG275

Course Title: THE BIBLE AS LITERATURE

Section: 1

CRN: 16853

Instructor Name: Anderson, Wayne C.

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 332

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1000

End Time: 1050

Course Description: 275 A survey of the major themes, forms, and styles of the Christian Bible, with an emphasis on genre and strategies of narrative. What is the Bible? How do the different literary forms of the Bible invite different ways of reading? How does the language of these stories convey meaning while also requiring interpretation? How has the Bible been interpreted in the past? Who wrote the Bible? How has the Bible been translated? How did the books of the Bible become the books of the Bible? For students of all faiths and varieties of doubt--those without any experience with the Bible, or those with great deal.. All are welcome, all respected. And the Bible itself: examined, explored, and celebrated as in part, whatever else it is, an anthology of important literary texts. Three midterm exams and frequent in-class writing.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Western Culture, Literature and the Arts

Special Topic: The Bible

*Pre-1800

 

Course ID: ENG299

Course Title: 20TH CENTURY POETRY

Section: 1

CRN: 19750

Instructor Name: Biespiel, David

Building: WB- Women's Building

Room: 205

Day: TR

Begin Time: 830

End Time: 950

Course Description: This course focuses on three major movements in 20th century poetry: American + British isles poetry, Eastern European poetry, and South American poetry, and the places they intersect and diverge. The poetry of the last century represents a negotiation between two major ways of being in the world. On the one hand, a sense that the world is fragmentary, disjointed, broken, fractured. On the other hand, that the effort of poetry is to seek out the coherences, the connectedness, the continuousness, and the mended. We will look at the work of many poets, including Adrienne Rich, Czeslaw Milosz, Pablo Neruda, Anna Akhmatova, Seamus Heaney, W.S. Merwin, and others, in order to learn about the NEW poetry of the last decade, and to find a deeper connection to the art of poetry of our time.

Special Topic: 20th Century Poetry

 

Course ID: ENG319

Course Title: THE AMERICAN NOVEL: POST-WORLD WAR II

Section: 1

CRN: 19746

Instructor Name: Dybek, Nicholas

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 334

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1200

End Time: 1320

Course Description: In this course we will analyze five novels written since 1945, with a particular eye towards the representation of “haves” and “have-nots” in postwar America. In works by such authors as Toni Morrison, Denis Johnson, and Junot Diaz, we’ll explore how the lenses of class, wealth, poverty, privilege and consumption both reduce and complicate basic notions of success, failure, and belonging in America.

 

Course ID: ENG319

Course Title: AMERICAN NOVEL: POST-WWII

Section: 400

CRN: 16061

Instructor Name: Elbom, Gilad

Building: ECAMPUS

Course Description: The novels we will read and discuss in this class, each in its own way, offer unique, original, often surprising perspectives on the trauma of World War II, life in a postmodern world, the mechanisms of language and literature, and the construction of narrative, identity, subjectivity, and reality. In Wise Blood (1952), a young ex-soldier returns from the war to challenge common concepts of sin, faith, sincerity, redemption, personal convictions and commercial enterprise, self-sacrifice and mass deception. In Nightmare in Pink (1964), Florida detective Travis McGee is temporarily in New York, trying to protect an attractive woman—and himself—from hallucinatory drugs, a lobotomized millionaire, a corrupt medical institution, and changing codes of masculinity and femininity. His Own Where (1971), a coming-of-age novel written in Black English, calls attention to the fact that domestic sociopolitical struggles may be much harder to win or resolve than major international conflicts. In similar ways, How German Is It (1980) examines familiar notions in new contexts: history, family, national character, intimate relations, and the very idea of fiction.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Literature and the Arts; Western Culture

 

Course ID: ENG320

Course Title: STUDIES-PAGE, STAGE, SCREEN

Section: 2

CRN: 19016

Instructor Name: St Germain, Justin

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 332

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1100

End Time: 1150

Course Description: In the sixty years since Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood first popularized the genre, “true crime” stories have become one of the most popular forms of nonfiction. In this course, we will read, watch, and discuss prominent examples of American true crime works in different forms--books, essays, TV shows, movies--everything from Capote to the recent Netflix show Making a Murderer. What do true crime stories typically have in common? How do they reflect the cultural assumptions of their creators or historical era? How true are they, really? Why are stories about crime so popular? We’ll ask all of those questions and many more in order to better understand the true crime genre and its importance in popular culture.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Literature and the Arts

 

Course ID: ENG330

Course Title: THE HOLOCAUST IN LITERATURE AND FILM

Section: 1

CRN: 19812

Instructor Name: Davison, Neil R.

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 332

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1200

End Time: 1250

Course Description: Is the Nazi Holocaust of European Jewry ultimately beyond the human imagination? Should the generations who did not witness those events compose “stories” about it, or write “poetry” that attempts to envision or search for the redemptive in it? Can there ever be a film that allows us to understand its magnitude, rather than merely make spectacle or heroics from discrete parts of its known history? How do these historical events inform our own era’s violence and mass murder?

 

Course ID: ENG362

Course Title: AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS

Section: 1

CRN: 19017

Instructor Name: Helle, Anita

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 334

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1000

End Time: 1120

Course Description: American Women Writers studies important literary works in a variety of genres by American women writers from historical, thematic, and formalist perspectives. This section is designed to acquaint students with major developments in the study of gender and authorship by American women writers from the late nineteenth century to the present. This course differs from many courses in literary studies by focusing explicitly on themes, plots, and images of women most closely linked to new freedoms, constraints, and changing definitions / performances of gender that have marked new developments in women's writing in the twentieth and twenty-first century.

 

Course ID: ENG375

Course Title: CHILDREN'S LITERATURE

Section: 400

CRN: 17733

Instructor Name: Braun, Clare

Building: ECAMPUS

Course Description: This course surveys a variety of genres, which may include fairy tales, folktales, fables, nonsense poetry, picture books, historical and fantasy novels, examining how these texts represent childhood and connect with historical, cultural, and psychological contexts. What counts as children’s literature? Is its purpose to entertain, to socialize, to indoctrinate, or something else? In this class, we will tackle these questions (and more) as we examine the development of children’s literature over time, beginning with the first “golden age” of the nineteenth century and ending with our current “golden age” in the twenty-first century. We will think about how conceptions of childhood have changed over time, shaped by and shaping the literature produced for children. Additionally, we will look at children’s literature from the perspective of craft, investigating how literary devices and styles are used by children’s authors to influence the child reader in a myriad of ways.

 

Course ID: ENG399

Course Title: CAREER PREP FOR ENG MAJORS

Section: 1

CRN: 19019

Instructor Name: Delf, Elizabeth D.

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 334

Day: MW

Begin Time: 1300

End Time: 1350

Course Description: English major, huh? What are you going to do with that? Anything you want! English majors become lawyers, software testers, publishers, social media managers, non-profit outreach specialists, and even (as everyone assumes) teachers. The same skills that you've used to analyze Bleak House and write about Baldwin can help you in the real world, too. As Frank B. Liebold argues in his 2010 article "Where Have All the Jobs Gone?", the current job market requires critical thinking and problem solving skills as much as anything else, and these transferable skill-sets, or competencies, have become the new currency for success and future employability.

We'll cover resumes and cover letters, of course, but also discuss how to find the career path that's right for you, and what you should be doing NOW to feel more confident when you graduate whether you're a sophomore or a senior.

Special Topic: Career Prep for English Majors

 

Course ID: ENG418

Course Title: ENG NOVEL: VICTORIAN PERIOD

Section: 1

CRN: 19020

Instructor Name: Ward, Megan

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 206

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1000

End Time: 1120

Course Description: We usually think of the Victorians as well-mannered, moralistic prudes but they were equally fascinated with violence, spectacle, imposters, madness, and corruption. This course will study representations of these monstrous others in order to peel back the veneer of Victorian decorum. We will read four novels and one novella published between 1830 and 1900 in order to understand a period equally captivated by respectability and aberration.

 

Course ID: ENG425

Course Title: STUDIES IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE

Section: 1

CRN: 19022

Instructor Name: Bude, Tekla

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 334

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1100

End Time: 1150

Course Description: What came before Montaigne's famous Essays, before Descartes' paradigm-shifting think, therefore I am, and before the rise of the Enlightenment individual? What did it mean to construct the self before the development of modern notions of selfhood? In this course, we will read premodern precursors of the personal memoir and the essay texts that deal with the idea of inwardness, personhood, identity, and subjectivity, in order to answer this question. We will read some most beautiful, moving, and disturbing texts in English literature: from the deathbed confessions of Julian of Norwich to the raucous autobiography of Margery Kempe, from visionary political and ethical complaints to survivor narratives of rape, depression, and anxiety, and from poetry to prose. This course will investigate how literature of the medieval period constructed notions of the self. It also welcomes creative engagement with these texts: I encourage students who wish to use the form, content, and structure of the narratives we will study this term to construct their own personal essays and memoirs.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Western Culture, Literature and the Arts

*Pre-1800

 

Course ID: FILM245

Course Title: THE NEW AMERICAN CINEMA

Section: 1

CRN: 14971

Instructor Name: Rust, Stephen

Building: OWEN- Owen Hall

Room: 103

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1200

End Time: 1320

Course Description: This class will attend post-rating system Hollywood (1968-present) by closely examining the important films and filmmakers of the period along with key events in the business of developing, producing, distributing, and exhibiting motion pictures. The course is based on the in-person version of the class taught on campus by Distinguished Professor Jon Lewis. The online version of the course features weekly video discussions with Dr. Lewis, filmmaker interview videos, and other audio-visual materials. Course readings develop the themes and information in greater detail. Students will watch, on their own, one to two films each week from the era and complete weekly discussion board posts about the films and answer questions about the readings. Major assignments include close readings of particular scenes and techniques used in the films completed as audio/visual essays and a comprehensive final exam. There are no prerequisites for this course; however, please keep in mind that this is an ambitious 200-level academic course, not a film appreciation class.

 

Course ID: FILM245

Course Title: THE NEW AMERICAN CINEMA: PUNK

Section: 1

CRN: 19741

Instructor Name: Lewis, Jon R.

Building: OWEN- Owen Hall

Room: 103

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1200

End Time: 1320

Course Description: This class will focus on a significant cultural phenomenon - PUNK -- circa 1975-1985 -- in film, music, and an array of other visual arts (painting, sculpture, video, photography, and performance). Weekly film screenings will include: Repo Man, The Decline of Western Civilization, Sid and Nancy, The Great Rock and Roll Swindle, Smithereens, Liquid Sky, Jubilee, and the avant garde films and photography of Richard Kern. Also of interest: punk visual art by Legs McNeil and Alan Vega, photography by Robert Mapplethorpe and Diego Cortez and music by X, The Sex Pistols, the Ramones, the Dead Kennedys, Circle Jerks, Richard Hell, and The Clash.

 

Course ID: FILM245

Course Title: THE NEW AMERICAN CINEMA: PUNK

Section: 400

CRN: 14971

Instructor Name: Rust, Stephen A.

Building: ECAMPUS

Course Description: This class will attend post-rating system Hollywood (1968-present) by closely examining the important films and filmmakers of the period along with key events in the business of developing, producing, distributing, and exhibiting motion pictures. The course is based on the in-person version of the class taught on campus by Distinguished Professor Jon Lewis. The online version of the course features weekly video discussions with Dr. Lewis, filmmaker interview videos, and other audio-visual materials. Course readings develop the themes and information in greater detail. Students will watch, on their own, one to two films each week from the era and complete weekly discussion board posts about the films and answer questions about the readings. Major assignments include close readings of particular scenes and techniques used in the films completed as audio/visual essays and a comprehensive final exam. There are no prerequisites for this course; however, please keep in mind that this is an ambitious 200-level academic course, not a film appreciation class.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Literature and the Arts

 

Course ID: FILM445

Course Title: DOCUMENTARY FILM STUDIES

Section: 1

CRN: 19744

Instructor Name: Baker, David

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 332

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1200

End Time: 1320

Course Description: This upper-division/graduate level seminar explores documentary films and filmmaking across a range of styles and subjects, but with a focus on science and natural resources storytelling. The course explores the role of a film producer in shaping narrative structure of a project and the intensive writing and collaboration required of documentary filmmakers, providing students with the most essential skills required for producing feature-length nonfiction films.

Special Topic: Science and Natural Resources Documentary Filmmaking

 

Course ID: FILM452

Course Title: STUDIES IN FILM

Section: 1

CRN: 19777

Instructor Name: Lewis, Jon R.

Building: GRP- Group Events

Room: OC

Day: R

Begin Time: 1600

End Time: 1950

Course Description: This class will engage an interdisciplinary study of The Godfather -- the Mario Puzo novel and the three films by Francis Coppola -- with an eye on the history of organized crime in America, on gangster films in American movie history, on Hollywood history in the so-called transition and new Hollywood eras, and on the particulars of cinematic form and style. Weekly film screenings will include the three Godfather films, relevant gangster films released before (Scarface, The Public Enemy, The Big Combo) and in the same era as Coppola's films (Mean Streets, Goodfellas).

 

Course ID: WR121

Course Title: WRITING COMPOSITION
Section: See Course Catalog
Course Description: WR 121 is designed to help students develop skills and confidence in analytical writing. It also emphasizes rhetorical awareness—the perception of where, how, and why persuasion is occurring. This section offers the unique opportunity for collaboration with the Valley Library’s Special Collections and Archives Research Center. Students will engage directly with materials from the University’s collections in the process of writing a high-quality, researched academic essay. Assignments and in-class activities will emphasize and explore the process of writing, including acts of reading, researching, analytical thinking, freewriting, drafting, review, revision, and editing.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Writing I

 

Course ID: WR130

Course Title: FUNDAMENTALS OF GRAMMAR

Section: 400

CRN: 19576

Instructor Name: TBD

Building: ECAMPUS

Course Description: WR 130 is a 1-credit course that provides opportunities to improve writing at the sentence level. The course focuses on the fundamental elements of the sentence (grammar), the principles and rules of sentence structure (syntax), and techniques for writing meaningful, compelling sentences (sentence building). In this course, students will learn to recognize common grammatical errors, how to fix them, and strategies for avoiding them in the first place. Students will also combine sentences, select powerful verbs, and develop an understanding of grammar fundamentals and style. WR 130 is an Ecampus course; students will work through online modules, activities, and quizzes to advance understanding of grammar fundamentals and to practice writing, editing, and revising sentences. Our work in the discussion board will emphasize student questions and ways of applying lessons to other academic writing projects. This course maintains a focus on standard grammatical correctness, but recognizes, discusses, and appreciates language differences.

 

Course ID: WR201

Course Title: WRITING FOR MEDIA

Section: 1

CRN: 11332

Instructor Name: St Jacques, Jillian

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 206

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1200

End Time: 1250

Course Description: The explosion of new media culture since the 1990s has led to a rapid proliferation of media forms. Words on paper still provide a staging ground for our enterprises, but we can no longer take it for granted that our projects emerge as text; the interlacement of visuals and multimedia content easily culminates in webcasts, podcasts, and other eye-catching multimedia forms. Through creating a variety of short journalistic projects, WR201 participants compare and contrast content in traditional media forms (journalism, public relations, advertising.), with content in new media styles (podcast, blog, multimedia packages, social media). Equipped with a basic journalistic toolbox, WR201 stakeholders create compelling short packages and use formal news criteria to critique the work of peers, analyzing which news stories pass muster and why.

 

Course ID: WR201

Course Title: WRITING FOR MEDIA

Section: 400

CRN: 18270

Instructor Name: St Jacques, Jillian

Building: ECAMPUS

Course Description: The explosion of new media culture since the 1990s has led to a rapid proliferation of media forms. Words on paper still provide a staging ground for our enterprises, but we can no longer take it for granted that our projects emerge as text; the interlacement of visuals and multimedia content easily culminates in webcasts, podcasts, and other eye-catching multimedia forms. Through creating a variety of short journalistic projects, WR201 participants compare and contrast content in traditional media forms (journalism, public relations, advertising.), with content in new media styles (podcast, blog, multimedia packages, social media). Equipped with a basic journalistic toolbox, WR201 stakeholders create compelling short packages and use formal news criteria to critique the work of peers, analyzing which news stories pass muster and why.

 

Course ID: WR214

Course Title: Business Writing

Section: See Course Catalog

Course Description: Thoughtful and thorough communication across multiple audiences and for multiple purposes continues to be an extremely important skill set in business. Writing in Business helps you build these skills and makes use of different networked technologies, software, and online materials in order to broaden your understanding of where, why, and how writing in the workplace happens. You’ll learn the principles and practices necessary for writing ethical and effective business letters, memos, and reports for a range of professional contexts. WR 214 will also help you present yourself as a professional, research job opportunities, write materials for job applications, and then land the position you want. The work you’ll do in this course is informed by current research in rhetoric and professional writing and is guided by the needs and practices of business, industry, and society at large.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Writing II

 

Course ID: WR222

Course Title: English Composition

CRN: See Course Catalog

Course Description: Argument may seem like a simple word; it’s anything but. One look at the title of your textbook supports that claim. Arguments live in everything we see, think and do. They can be as overt as a Presidential debate and as subtle as a paint color. When you start seeing argumentation in this way, the possibilities are endless. As varied as arguments come, there are tried and true constants in the analysis and crafting of their myriad messages. Arguments are conversations. There is more than one voice in the room. They are grounded in the art of persuasion. They succeed and fail on an understanding of audience. In this course, you will learn the basics of what goes into good argumentative writing through extensive reading, analyzing, brain storming, peer reviewing, revising, debating and (of course) writing. You will develop strategies to help you interpret a variety of texts and compose in a variety of media. This course will show you how a sound argument moves, considering structure, support and form. You will improve your ability to revise your ideas, the reasoning that supports those ideas, and the writingthat illustrates them.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Writing II

 

Course ID: WR222

Course Title: ENGLISH COMPOSITION *PSYCHOLOGY

Section: 3

CRN: 10142

Instructor Name: Drummond, Robert J.

Course Description: WR 222 for Psychology Majors. This specialized section of WR 222 will continue practice in expository writing with an emphasis on argumentation and research specifically for Psychology Majors. (Bacc Core Course) PREREQS: WR 121 [C-] or WR 121H [C-] or Placement Test WWRI(1)

Argument may seem like a simple word; it’s anything but. One look at the title of your textbook supports that claim. Arguments live in everything we see, think, and do. They can be as overt as a Presidential debate and as subtle as a paint color. When you start seeing argumentation in this way, the possibilities are endless. As varied as arguments come, there are tried and true constants in the analysis and crafting of their myriad messages. Arguments are conversations. There is more than one voice in the room. They are grounded in the art of persuasion. They succeed and fail on an understanding of audience. In this course, you will learn the basics of what goes into good argumentative writing through extensive reading, analyzing, brain storming, peer reviewing, revising, debating, and (of course) writing. This section of WR 222 is specific to Psychology majors; students will gain additional preparation for making arguments in the Psychology major, including writing approaches, research, and APA style.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Writing II

 

Course ID: WR222

Course Title: ENGLISH COMPOSITION *PSHYCHOLOGY

Section: 12

CRN: 13632

Instructor Name: Drummond, Robert J.

Course Description: WR 222 for Psychology Majors. This specialized section of WR 222 will continue practice in expository writing with an emphasis on argumentation and research specifically for Psychology Majors. (Bacc Core Course) PREREQS: WR 121 [C-] or WR 121H [C-] or Placement Test WWRI(1)

Argument may seem like a simple word; it’s anything but. One look at the title of your textbook supports that claim. Arguments live in everything we see, think, and do. They can be as overt as a Presidential debate and as subtle as a paint color. When you start seeing argumentation in this way, the possibilities are endless. As varied as arguments come, there are tried and true constants in the analysis and crafting of their myriad messages. Arguments are conversations. There is more than one voice in the room. They are grounded in the art of persuasion. They succeed and fail on an understanding of audience. In this course, you will learn the basics of what goes into good argumentative writing through extensive reading, analyzing, brain storming, peer reviewing, revising, debating, and (of course) writing. This section of WR 222 is specific to Psychology majors; students will gain additional preparation for making arguments in the Psychology major, including writing approaches, research, and APA style.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Writing II

 

Course ID: WR224

Course Title: INTRO TO FICTION WRITING

Section: 400

CRN: 13008

Instructor Name: Harrison, Wayne M.

Building: ECAMPUS

Course Description: This online fiction writing workshop examines the basic techniques of fiction, with related writing exercises. We will discuss literary craft elements that include characterization, significant detail, dialogue, voice, point of view, tone, pacing and setting, as well as figurative language concepts such as symbolism, metaphor and theme. Students will develop a critical vocabulary with which to analyze how successfully fiction meets the expectations of literature. Students will study the work of professional fiction writers and apply the principles of contemporary fiction to their own writing to establish dimensional characters and plotlines, and to create dialogue that is rich and revealing, and exploring aspects of narrative, point of view, tone, pacing, plot, theme, etc creating and revising a satisfying short story. They will also critique the creative work of their fellow students in weekly peer review workshops. Assessment methods include creative writing exercises, quizzes and reading checks on textbook craft sections, peer review, and the evolution of a short story from rough draft to a 10 page final draft that meets the structural and thematic qualifications of literature.

 

Course ID: WR224

Course Title: INTRO TO FICTION WRITING

Section: 401

CRN: 17737

Instructor Name: Harrison, Wayne M.

Building: ECAMPUS

Course Description: This online fiction writing workshop examines the basic techniques of fiction, with related writing exercises. We will discuss literary craft elements that include characterization, significant detail, dialogue, voice, point of view, tone, pacing and setting, as well as figurative language concepts such as symbolism, metaphor and theme. Students will develop a critical vocabulary with which to analyze how successfully fiction meets the expectations of literature. Students will study the work of professional fiction writers and apply the principles of contemporary fiction to their own writing to establish dimensional characters and plotlines, and to create dialogue that is rich and revealing, and exploring aspects of narrative, point of view, tone, pacing, plot, theme, etc creating and revising a satisfying short story. They will also critique the creative work of their fellow students in weekly peer review workshops. Assessment methods include creative writing exercises, quizzes and reading checks on textbook craft sections, peer review, and the evolution of a short story from rough draft to a 10 page final draft that meets the structural and thematic qualifications of literature.

 

Course ID: WR228

Course Title: WRITING ABROAD

Section: 400

CRN: 19748

Instructor Name: Griffin, Kristin

Building: ECAMPUS

Course Description: Writing Abroad will prepare students in the College of Liberal Arts to compose thoughtful, nuanced, and journalistically-grounded writing for a Web-based audience based on experiences studying abroad. By reading deeply in the lifestyle and creative nonfiction genres, students will develop strategies for communicating their observations effectively. Instruction follows an editorial model, allowing students to practice the role of editor, freelancer, and designer, all with an eye towards publishing in a course-affiliated online magazine. To achieve success in this course, students must demonstrate knowledge of writing techniques appropriate to the genre and must demonstrate editorial skill.

Special Topic: Writing Abroad

 

Course ID: WR230

Course Title: ESSENTIALS OF ENGLISH GRAMMAR

Section: 400

CRN: 19664

Instructor Name: TBD

Building: ECAMPUS

Course Description: WR 230 is a 3-credit course that introduces students to the structure of sentences with a focus on beginning grammar. Students in WR 230 will learn the differences between clauses and phrases, how to recognize subjects and predicates, how to avoid the most common grammatical errors, and how to use punctuation correctly--and with intention. Students will complete readings, participate in discussions and group projects, and demonstrate understanding through multiple-choice and short-answer quizzes. Students will also create writing and analyze grammatical choices in a series of discourse analysis projects.

 

Course ID: WR241

Course Title: INTRO TO POETRY WRITING

Section: 3

CRN: 14296

Instructor Name: Richter, Jennifer B.

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 206

Day: TR

Begin Time: 830

End Time: 950

Course Description: This course is designed to help you sharpen your sensitivity to language and become a skilled reader and writer of poetry. We will study the basic elements of poetry”including imagery, voice, lineation, and meter”to further develop our understanding of poetic techniques.We will work on in-class writing exercises to help coax your initial ideas into finished poems. In the workshop, we will discuss your own poems in depth. Our goal in workshopping one another's poems will be to sharpen our own critical faculties while providing thoughtful, useful feedback. We will also read and study a variety of published poems to understand both the nature of contemporary poetry and the literary tradition of which we, as poets, are a part.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Writing ll

 

Course ID: WR240

Course Title: INTRO TO NONFICTION WRITING

Section: 1

CRN: 16118

Instructor Name: GTA

Building: STRAND- Strand Agriculture Hall

Room: 161

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1200

End Time: 1250

Course Description: Creative nonfiction is the genre of creative writing that bridges the act of making literary prose--the crafting of vivid scenes, a thoughtful narrative voice, and meaningful formats--with the kinds of practical personal writing often required in our academic and professional lives. In this course, we will discuss several published pieces from the creative nonfiction genre, including personal essays, memoir, and lyric essay. More importantly, we will also write, edit, workshop, and revise several pieces of our own creative nonfiction. Expect a lively class with lots of imaginative prompts, free-writes, and hardy discussion.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Writing II

 

Course ID: WR241

Course Title: INTRO TO POETRY WRITING

Section: 4

CRN: 16075

Instructor Name: Roush, Stephanie R.

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 362

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1400

End Time: 1520

Course Description: “A poet is, before anything else, a person who is passionately in love with language” ― W.H. Auden. In this course, we will explore the poetic craft and immerse ourselves in language as both readers and writers. This course will provide a firm grounding in the rudiments of poetic craft such as word choice, line breaks, imagery, and sound, as well as an introduction to different forms available to poets. We will consistently work through writing exercises and read the work of various poets in order to aid us in the generation of our own poems. I hope that you will become genuinely attached to the works/words of a few, if not all, of the poets we engage.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Writing II

 

Course ID: WR303

Course Title: WRITING FOR THE WEB

Section: 1

CRN: 16234

Instructor Name: Ribero, Ana

Building: MLM

Room: 234

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1000

End Time: 1120

Course Description: Writing for the Web prepares students to produce instructive, informative, and rhetorically savvy writing for Web-based locations and applications. This course responds to the need for clear, effective, and detail-oriented writing in existing genres and for analysis and production in new and developing platforms. Instruction is grounded in rhetorical theory and by current research in digital rhetoric and technical writing as well as current multimedia writing practices. Students learn effective strategies for writing and producing web content, particularly through the use of existing websites and services, but also through the construction of their own websites. To achieve success in this course, students must demonstrate knowledge of advanced writing techniques adaptable for numerous networked, multimedia contexts.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Writing II

 

Course ID: WR303

Course Title: WRITING FOR THE WEB

Section: 400

CRN: 19053

Instructor Name: Kelly, Kristy L.

Building: ECAMPUS

Course Description: Writing for the Web prepares students to produce instructive, informative, and rhetorically savvy writing for Web-based locations and applications. This course responds to the need for clear, effective, and detail-oriented writing in existing genres and for analysis and production in new and developing platforms. Instruction is grounded in rhetorical theory and by current research in digital rhetoric and technical writing as well as current multimedia writing practices. Students learn effective strategies for writing and producing web content, particularly through the use of existing websites and services, but also through the construction of their own websites. To achieve success in this course, students must demonstrate knowledge of advanced writing techniques adaptable for numerous networked, multimedia contexts.

 

Course ID: WR323

Course Title: ENGLISH COMPOSITION

Section: 400

CRN: 13505

Instructor Name: Peters, Patrick J.

Building: ECAMPUS

Course Description: Writing and the reading of writing are social processes that encourage the reader to interpret and respond to texts in varied, unique, and often complex ways. Students in WR 323 will be asked to read and respond to the work of others and compose their own texts with a heightened awareness of style, or the way in which language is used to clearly and gracefully articulate one’s own worldview. Students will be challenged to conceive of and develop their own style, focusing on elements of diction, tone, emphasis, shape and clarity.

 

Course ID: WR324

Course Title: SHORT STORY WRITING

Section: 400

CRN: 13274

Instructor Name: TBD

Building: ECAMPUS

Course Description: This section of Short Story Writing focuses on flash fiction--the very short story. We will read a wide range of flash fictions, and we'll discuss what might make a piece of flash fiction successful. We'll evaluate the snap-shot feel of a 1000 (or fewer!) word story, and we'll identify and question elements of traditional stories.
Students will write a minimum of three flash fictions, and submit them for student and instructor feedback in a workshop discussion board. Students will also read and discuss numerous flash fictions and be exposed to a wide variety of resources for creative writers online. This course makes use of open-source materials; no textbook is required.
This course is fully online, and uses Canvas, our online learning platform. In our online learning community, you will access learning materials, complete and submit assignments, and interact with your classmates and with the instructor through the discussion board.

 

Course ID: WR324

Course Title: SHORT STORY WRITING

Section: 1

CRN: 18378

Instructor Name: Dybek, Nicholas

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 362

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1000

End Time: 1120

Course Description: Tim O’Brien writes that a story, if truly told, makes the “stomach believe.” But how do you convince a reader to believe, or even care about, something that never happened? In this class, we will attempt to answer this question—and many others—by reading and critiquing works of fiction (by published writers and by you and your classmates), and by completing short exercises that aim to illuminate the craft by calling attention to choices and effects of imagery, perspective, character, etc. This course will follow the workshop model of peer critique, so be prepared to write and read quite a bit and have at least two pieces of original fiction workshopped in class. Many would argue that writing cannot be taught. But, as with any craft—origami, ship carpentry—there is a long tradition of studying fiction in order to learn specific and/or established techniques and writing strategies. On the other hand, some of the most exciting fiction occurs when a writer disregards or flouts expected craft choices. In this course we’ll endeavor to figure out what “the rules” are and how and when to break them.

 

Course ID: WR327

Course Title: TECHNICAL WRITING

Section: See Course CatalogCourse Description: WR 327 will prepare you to produce instructive, informational, and persuasive documents aimed at well-defined and achievable outcomes. Technical documents are precise, concise, and organized, but often based on complex information. However, the purpose and target audience of each document often determines how that information is presented, including writing style, document layout, vocabulary, sentence and paragraph structure, and visuals, among other factors. To this end, this course teaches processes for analyzing writing contexts and producing effective, clean, and reader-centered documents in an efficient manner. Grounded in rhetorical theory, WR 327 presents contemporary research in technical communication and instructs students in current best practices. Individually and in groups, students learn effective strategies for communicating with technology in the modern, networked workplace.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Writing II

 

Course ID: WR327

Course Title: TECHNICAL WRITING *Engineering

Section: 1

CRN: 10169

Instructor Name: Elbom, Emily

Course Description: In the “Technical Writing for Engineers” sections of WR 327, students use an engineering communication textbook and engage with the course objectives and learning outcomes through engineering-specific activities and assignments. This approach serves two purposes. First, by focusing specifically on principles of effective engineering communication, the course builds proficiency in the kinds of communication practices you will be tasked with both in pro-school and in the engineering workplace. Second, your engagement with fundamental engineering concepts in each of the course assignments will both solidify and extend your repertoire of technical knowledge. In other words, participation in this course not only will help you become a better engineering communicator but will also lead to greater conceptual and technical fluency in your chosen field.

 

Course ID: WR327

Course Title: TECHNICAL WRITING *ENGINEERING

Section: 5

CRN: 10172

Instructor Name: Elbom, Emily

Course Description: In the “Technical Writing for Engineers” sections of WR 327, students use an engineering communication textbook and engage with the course objectives and learning outcomes through engineering-specific activities and assignments. This approach serves two purposes. First, by focusing specifically on principles of effective engineering communication, the course builds proficiency in the kinds of communication practices you will be tasked with both in pro-school and in the engineering workplace. Second, your engagement with fundamental engineering concepts in each of the course assignments will both solidify and extend your repertoire of technical knowledge. In other words, participation in this course not only will help you become a better engineering communicator but will also lead to greater conceptual and technical fluency in your chosen field.

 

Course ID: WR327

Course Title: TECHNICAL WRITING *ENGINEERING

Section: 7

CRN: 11435

Instructor Name: Halton, Alyssa

Building: KIDD 028

Room: 028

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1600

End Time: 1720

Course Description: In our new “Technical Writing for Engineers” sections of WR 327, engineering students have the opportunity to practice the kinds of writing they will likely be asked to produce both in pro-school and in their relative engineering fields post-graduation. The course is centered in developing effective technical communication strategies for a variety of audiences and contexts, and utilizes an engineering-specific technical writing textbook to establish the principles behind the practice. Assignments are designed to ask students to engage with the leaning outcomes and course objectives through work with engineering concepts and content. Students should expect to not only gain experience in the general practice of technical communication, but to also develop a heightened fluency in concepts and communication strategies within their respective fields.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: WR II

 

Course ID: WR327

Course Title: TECHNICAL WRITING *ENGINEERING

Section: 16

CRN: 14057

Instructor Name: Halton, Alyssa

Course Description: In our new “Technical Writing for Engineers” sections of WR 327, engineering students have the opportunity to practice the kinds of writing they will likely be asked to produce both in pro-school and in their relative engineering fields post-graduation. The course is centered in developing effective technical communication strategies for a variety of audiences and contexts, and utilizes an engineering-specific technical writing textbook to establish the principles behind the practice. Assignments are designed to ask students to engage with the leaning outcomes and course objectives through work with engineering concepts and content. Students should expect to not only gain experience in the general practice of technical communication, but to also develop a heightened fluency in concepts and communication strategies within their respective fields.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: WR II

 

Course ID: WR340

Course Title: CREATIVE NONFICTION

Section: 1

CRN: 17815

Instructor Name: St Germain, Justin

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 332

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1300

End Time: 1350

Course Description: This course will focus on reading, writing, and understanding the genre of creative nonfiction. Students will read extensively and gain experience writing and revising their own work, as well as participating in discussion and workshops. We’ll examine contemporary works of creative nonfiction from writers such as James Baldwin, Jo Ann Beard, and David Foster Wallace, in order to analyze their use of craft—form, scene, characterization, sources, etc.—and to use them as examples. You will be expected to read up to 100 pages per week, to participate each day in discussion, and to write assignments or exercises every week, as well as to write multiple drafts of creative pieces. Please consider this workload before enrolling in the course.

 

Course ID: WR362

Course Title: SCIENCE WRITING

Section: 1

CRN: 19781

Instructor Name: Snyder, Wesley

Building: STAG- Strand Agriculture Hall

Room: 161

Day: TR

Begin Time: 0830

End Time: 0920

Course Description: In WR 362, Science Writing, we’ll study the practice and conventions for writing about science to a broader public of non-professionals. We’ll read and analyze some of the best and most influential science journalism from the past few years and see what makes that writing successful, before we write our own news pieces and feature articles, paying attention to both print and digital outlets for that work. While the course addresses some of the more practical skills involved in writing about complex scientific information, we’ll also learn about the models of science communication that support that work. We’ll work on some writing projects together, as an entire class, though all students will have the opportunity to pursue their specific areas of scientific interest – and investigate fields in which OSU excels. Reading and writing assignments have been designed to help students gain greater insight into the issues and challenges of science writing in a variety of contexts.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Writing II

 

Course ID: WR407

Course Title: SEM/ SCREENWRITING

Section: 1

CRN: 18495

Instructor Name: Turkel, David K.

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 332

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1600

End Time: 1720

Course Description: Fundamentally, this is a seminar about story structure—how to recognize, analyze and utilize its salient features as creative practitioners. In simplest terms, this structure can be boiled down to beginning, middle andend. Yet, clearly, there’s more to it. All stories end; not all feel complete. Students in this course will examine the underlying architecture which unites sitcom pilots with masterworks of the cinema and the stage, as they plot their own story outlines and practice the fundamentals of professional screenplay formatting. They will meet—via Skype and in-class visitation—with seasoned professionals, present pitches and short-form creative assignments, and participate in the “prescriptive” workshop setting unique to the industry.

 

Course ID: WR411

Course Title: THE TEACHING OF WRITING

Section: 1

CRN: 19028

Instructor Name: Pflugfelder, Ehren H.

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 332

Day: TR

Begin Time: 830

End Time: 950

Course Description: In WR 411/511, The Teaching of Writing, we'll study research about the teaching of writing and practice what it means to assign, evaluate, and respond to student writers. This course is designed to introduce current and future teachers of writing to theory and pedagogy in composition studies, to help us become aware of and strengthen our own writing processes, and to enable us to make and express connections between classroom experience and composition theory. We'll be looking at assessment, response, assignment creation, grammar, literacy, multimedia, process, and genre as we explore composition and writing. Students will be expected to complete substantial reading assignments, informal and formal writing assignments, collaborative and digital assignments, and reading responses, as well as participate in class discussions and activities. Coming out of this class, you''ll be better prepared to teach and evaluate your students' writing and likely feel more confident in your own writing.

*WIC (Writing Intensive Course)

 

Course ID: WR448

Course Title: MAGAZINE ARTICLE WRITING

Section: 1

CRN: 18268

Instructor Name: Griffin, Kristin

Building: STAG- Strand Agriculture Hall

Room: 263

Day: TR

Begin Time: 1000

End Time: 1120

Course Description: This course will guide you through the process of querying, writing, and selling your first magazine article. Reading deeply in the genre, both in print and online, you will develop an understanding of the marketplace and learn strategies for building a freelance writing practice. This includes considerations of what makes for a good magazine article, discussions about recognizing and cultivating expertise, and exercises intended to hone your unique voice. You'll be introduced to valuable resources, will have the opportunity to chat with active editors, and will share your work with peers during in-class workshops. We'll discuss the freelance marketplace and you will be encouraged to follow your own personal interests wherever they may lead, from snowboarding to fly fishing to travel and food. Course readings will be current and varied, reflecting the freelance marketplace as it exists today. Expect a practical nuts and bolts class, one that leaves you a stronger and more confident writer.

Special Topic: Magazine Writing

 

Course ID: WR449

Course Title: CRITICAL REVIEWING

Section: 400

CRN: 15538

Instructor Name: Strini, Thomas S.

Building: ECAMPUS

Course Description: In WR449 Critical Reviewing, students will write about the arts, in the broadest sense, from literature to advertising to music to dance, drama and visual arts. The will work in writer-editor teams and publish their work in The Corvallis Review, an online magazine that has attracted over 110,000 page views. In addition to expanding knowledge about the arts and about writing, students will learn the basics of search engine optimization, social media promotion and other techniques for winning readers.

 

Course ID: WR497

Course Title: DIGITAL LITERACY AND CULTURE

Section: 1

CRN: 19030

Instructor Name: Kelly, Kristy L.

Building: MORE- Moreland Hall

Room: 362

Day: MWF

Begin Time: 1000

End Time: 1050

Course Description: Digital Literacy and Culture examines the relationships between human expression and the technologies we use to mediate those expressions. This class will explore the various literacy practices that shape our experiences of writing, thinking, and meaning-making in this age of information. We will trace the historical and cultural lineages of digital technologies, thinking through the ways that social networks, smartphones, and digitized mass media have reshaped the means and ends of cultural production. This course will have a special focus on social justice activism as it plays out on social media platforms like Twitter.