Some Winter 2019 highlights will include:

 

Thursday, February 7, 4 p.m. Sarah Snyder on Human Rights Activism
"From Selma to Moscow: How Human Rights Activists Transformed U.S. Foreign Policy"

Memorial Union, La Raza Room 208. Lightly catered. Free and open to the public.
Sarah Snyder is Associate Professor in the School of International Service at American University

Bio
Sarah B. Snyder is a historian of U.S. foreign relations who specializes in the history of the Cold War, human rights activism, and U.S. human rights policy. She is the author of From Selma to Moscow: How Human Rights Activists Transformed U.S. Foreign Policy (Columbia University Press, 2018), which explains how transnational connections and 1960s-era social movements inspired Americans to advocate for a new approach to human rights. Her first book, Human Rights Activism and the End of the Cold War: A Transnational History of the Helsinki Network, (Cambridge University Press), analyzes the development of a transnational network devoted to human rights advocacy and its contributions to the end of the Cold War. The Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations awarded it the 2012 Stuart Bernath Book Prize by for best first book by an author and the 2012 Myrna F. Bernath Book Award for the best book written by a woman in the field in the previous two years. In addition to authoring several chapters in edited collections, she has also published articles in Diplomatic History, Cold War History, Human Rights Quarterly, Diplomacy & Statecraft, Journal of Transatlantic Studies, European Journal of Human Rights and Journal of American Studies. She previously served as a Lecturer at University College London, a Cassius Marcellus Clay Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of History at Yale University, the Pierre Keller Post -Doctoral Fellow in Transatlantic Relations at the Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies also at Yale, and as a professorial lecturer at Georgetown University. Snyder received her Ph.D. from Georgetown, a M.A. from University College London, and a B.A. with honors from Brown University.

 

 

Tuesday, March 5, 4 p.m. Immigration Scholar Mae Ngai
"Nation of Immigrants: A Short History of an Idea"

Memorial Union, La Raza Room 208. Lightly catered. Free and open to the public.
Mae Ngai is Lung Family Professor of Asian American Studies and Professor of History at Columbia University

Bio
Mae M. Ngai, Lung Family Professor of Asian American Studies and Professor of History, is a U.S. legal and political historian interested in questions of immigration, citizenship, and nationalism. She is author of the award winning Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America (2004) and The Lucky Ones: One Family and the Extraordinary Invention of Chinese America (2010). Ngai has written on immigration history and policy for the Washington Post, New York Times, Los Angeles Times, the Nation, and the Boston Review. Before becoming a historian she was a labor-union organizer and educator in New York City, working for District 65-UAW and the Consortium for Worker Education. She is now writing The Chinese Question (under contract with WW Norton), a study of Chinese gold miners and racial politics in nineteenth-century California, Australia, and South Africa; and Nation of Immigrants: A Short History of an Idea (under contract with Princeton University Press). 

 

 

"Ideology and US Foreign Relations" International History Conference
Friday, May 31-Saturday June 1, 2019 Memorial Union, Journey Room
Panels 9 a.m.-5 p.m., with coffee and lunch breaks. More than 20 scholars coming from around the world.
See participants and rough tentative schedule

Keynote address/OSU Governor Tom McCall Memorial Lecture: "Trump and Ideology"
Friday, May 31, 7 p.m. Memorial Union, Horizon Room
James Lindsay, Senior VP, Greenberg Chair and Director of Studies, Council on Foreign Relations