Welcome to the School of Writing, Literature, and Film!

We look forward to seeing you in Fall Term of 2022. As you can tell from the lineup below, there are many exciting learning opportunities ahead. To get started, you can use this page to read course descriptions for the fall, find a detailed breakdown of Baccalaureate Core course offerings, scope out Spring 2022 office hours for instructors and faculty, and grab contact information for our Advisor, Liddy Detar.

We encourage you to read these descriptions carefully and reach out to course instructors or your advisor with any specific questions.

Course Descriptions

AJ 311
MEDIA STORYTELLING

Section: 1
CRN: 15322
St Jacques, Jillian

MORE - Moreland Hall 206
MWF 1000-1050

Whether you’re a seasoned journalist or absolute newcomer, AJ311 will enable you to produce compelling news stories in both digital and multimedia style. Starting with the basics of news reporting, participants will conduct interviews, gather facts and assemble accurate feature-length stories by deadline. Then, they will learn to increase their storytelling range through incorporating graphics, photographs, video clips, audio files, and anything else that brings the reader more fully inside. Learning to write news stories entails an intimate relationship with Associated Press style and copyediting procedures. By the end of the course, students will be fully equipped to produce visually dynamic and factually robust news packages capable of shaping, informing—and maybe even changing the human community. You’ll select the idea and its means of delivery; we’ll help you get that story right on target.
 


AJ 490
MEDIA LAW AND ETHICS
Section: 1
CRN: 16122
St Jacques, Jillian

MORE - Moreland Hall 332
F 1200-1250

Hybrid

When journalists break laws or compromise their ethics, it does not merely result in high costs to employers (as in multi-million-dollar lawsuits)—it takes an incalculable toll on our profession in terms of credibility and prestige. We begin AJ490 by articulating the difference between media law and media ethics, then evaluate (and write about) specific case studies that engage and support ethical and legal precedent. As this concerns media law, students review contemporary legal casework to identify and verbalize legal dispositions towards defamation, libel, plagiarism, copyright, fair use, public domain and privacy. Concerning media ethics, students identify and explain pivotal concepts such as fairness, conflict of interest, cultural sensitivity, balance, diversity issues, gratuitousness, stereotyping, objectivity and the protection of the rights of minors. This class is taught in a hybrid format, which necessitates a high degree of online and interpersonal interaction.

ENG 104
INTRO TO LITERATURE: FICTION
Section: 1
CRN: 10161
Bushnell, John T.

MORE - Moreland Hall 330
MWF 900-950

Understanding a story is one thing, but experiencing its impact is another. In this course, you’ll discover the simple routes into the heart of a story and witness how they’re enriched by more subtle literary elements. The goal will be not just to understand how fiction operates but to access its full range of emotional and intellectual rewards. By the end of the term, you will have received exposure to a broad variety of narratives, cultures, and ideas, and you will have developed the skills to appreciate their meaning, value, and pleasure.
 


ENG 104
INTRO TO LITERATURE: FICTION
Section: 2
CRN: 16882
Norris, Marcos A.

MORE - Moreland Hall 330
TR 1200-1320

This course offers students a rigorous examination of the short story as it has developed artistically and generically in the Western world over the past two centuries. Primary readings include such authors as Edgar Allan Poe, Anton Chekhov, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Virginia Woolf, Flannery O’Connor, Ernest Hemingway, Raymond Carver, and contemporary authors C. Pam Zhang, Stephanie Soileau, Nicole Krauss, and George Saunders. Secondary readings include selections from Paul March-Russell’s The Short Story: An Introduction and The New Short Story Theories, edited by Charles E. May. Students will develop critical stances on the short story as a genre, they will develop their skills as literary critics, and they will practice the art of literary criticism, a genre all its own.
 


ENG 104
INTRO TO LITERATURE: FICTION
Section: 3
CRN: 19903
Weaver, Damien C.

BEXL - Bexell Hall 412
MWF 1400-1450

This course proceeds on the notion raised by literary critic Lionel Trilling: that a central function of literary fiction is to “reveal the human fact within the veil of circumstances.” Here, we will read and discuss numerous works of short fiction with the aim of cultivating an awareness of writerly craft and “the human fact” it seeks ever to convey. We will familiarize ourselves with the basic elements of narrative—character, setting, plot, symbolism, theme, structure, style, tone, and so forth. Overall, we’re concerned with thinking about how different writers seek to convey “the human fact” as a timeless, universal condition and as something shaped by the specific contexts—social, cultural, historical, etc.—in which these stories are set and in which they were written. We’re also concerned with the significance of the text at the time of its reading, i.e., how this is relevant to us in the current moment of 2022.
 


ENG 104
INTRO TO LITERATURE: FICTION
Section: 400
CRN: 12489
Harrison, Wayne M.

Ecampus

This online introductory course will examine literary fiction in the novel and short story form from the perspective of a fiction writer. Students will develop a critical vocabulary with which to analyze how successfully the assigned authors have fulfilled the expectations of literary fiction. Craft discussions will focus on literary elements that include characterization, significant detail, dialogue, voice, point of view, and setting, as well as figurative language concepts such as symbolism, metaphor and theme. Required reading will include two contemporary novels and two collections of contemporary short stories. The voices are wide ranging and represent a good sample of contemporary literature. Course work will include a mid-term and final exam, three quizzes and weekly reading checks.
 


ENG 104
INTRO TO LITERATURE: FICTION
Section: 401
CRN: 16787
Delf, Elizabeth D.

Ecampus

What is a story? How does fiction create or reflect the culture and historical moment in which they are written? Why do we (or why should we) read literature at all? In this class, we will build answers to these foundational questions. Using a critical lens, we will work to understand both the implied and stated meaning of short stories from across the last two centuries, as well as developing our knowledge of the key elements of fiction. We will discuss these stories in small and large groups, learn about the authors and the historical context in which they were written, and analyze them for a richer understanding and appreciation.
 


ENG 104
INTRO TO LITERATURE: FICTION
Section: 402
CRN: 19901
Weaver, Damien C.

Ecampus

This course proceeds on the notion raised by literary critic Lionel Trilling: that a central function of literary fiction is to “reveal the human fact within the veil of circumstances.” Here, we will read and discuss numerous works of short fiction with the aim of cultivating an awareness of writerly craft and “the human fact” it seeks ever to convey. We will familiarize ourselves with the basic elements of narrative—character, setting, plot, symbolism, theme, structure, style, tone, and so forth. Overall, we’re concerned with thinking about how different writers seek to convey “the human fact” as a timeless, universal condition and as something shaped by the specific contexts—social, cultural, historical, etc.—in which these stories are set and in which they were written. We’re also concerned with the significance of the text at the time of its reading, i.e., how this is relevant to us in the current moment of 2022.
 


ENG 106
INTRO TO LITERATURE: POETRY
Section: 1
CRN: 12402
Instructor TBA

MORE - Moreland Hall 330
MWF 1200-1250

Offers a broad introduction to poetry. Encourages students to be more skilled and confident readers of poetry. Develops an understanding of poetic craft by studying the basic elements of poetry, including detail, imagery, voice, and lineation. Considers how contemporary poetry is in conversation with poems in the American literary tradition. 
 


ENG 106
INTRO TO LITERATURE: POETRY
Section: 400
CRN: 12832
Instructor TBA

Ecampus

Offers a broad introduction to poetry. Encourages students to be more skilled and confident readers of poetry. Develops an understanding of poetic craft by studying the basic elements of poetry, including detail, imagery, voice, and lineation. Considers how contemporary poetry is in conversation with poems in the American literary tradition.
 


ENG 201
SHAKESPEARE
Section: 2
CRN: 17000
Olson, Rebecca R.

MORE - Moreland Hall 330
TR 1400-1520

Hybrid

An introduction to the first half of Shakespeare’s dramatic career (the Elizabethan period), with attention to the playwright’s continued global influence. This course is designed to help students become confident readers of Shakespeare’s language, articulate the significance of aural and visual elements of Shakespearean scripts, and analyze the plays in light of specific cultural and historical contexts, both early modern and contemporary. Plays include Richard III, Romeo and Juliet, The Merchant of Venice, and Hamlet.
 


ENG 204
SURVEY OF BRITISH LIT: BEGINNING TO 1660
Section: 1
CRN: 19621
Bude, Tekla

MORE - Moreland Hall 330
MW 1000-1150

This course is an introduction to English literature from its beginnings through Chaucer and Shakespeare. From Old English riddles and charms to bawdy fabliaux, from travel narratives to sonnets and the rise of professional theater, this course will survey nearly a thousand years of English literary forms in their political, cultural, and artistic contexts, with an eye to understanding how premodern literature and language shaped the course of history. In 800 CE, ”England”  was merely a loose conglomeration of small kingdoms, a backwater in the North Atlantic fighting to survive against Viking invaders. By 1660, the English Empire was a growing colonial power internally fragmented by political and religious dissent. What was literature in this early period of English history, and how did its definition, power, and use change over time? What did it mean to read? What relationship did early English literature have to music, the visual arts, and scientific thought? How did English literature create the idea of an English nation?
 


ENG 205
SURVEY OF BRITISH LIT: RESTORATION/ROMANTIC
Section: 1
CRN: 17565
Holmberg, Karen E.

MORE - Moreland Hall 332
TR 1200-1350

This course presents a chronological survey of British Literature from the Restoration through the Romantic age. We will consider the cultural, historical, and intellectual contexts of the writers we study, as well as issues of influence and inheritance.  By reading broadly in British poetry and prose, the student will gain an appreciation of the movements within the history of modern literature in English, practice close reading and interpretive skills, and refine their understanding of literary forms and structure. Readings include the Metaphysical Poets, Milton’s Paradise Lost, 18th century women writers such as Mary Wortley Montagu and Mary Wollstonecraft, and select Romantic writers. We will use Mary Shelley’s Romantic novel Frankenstein as a contextualizing lens for studying the Romantic period, focusing on the numerous writers it quotes or alludes to such as Milton, Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Percy Bysshe Shelley. Student will be evaluated based on weekly reading responses, two exams and a final essay.
 


ENG 213
LITERATURES OF THE WORLD: MIDDLE EAST
Section: 400
CRN: 19708
Kurman, Nirit

Ecampus

This course will offer a close reading of modern Middle Eastern literary works, focusing on the voices of the Middle East itself, rather than western voices about the Middle East. We will examine literary stylistic choices such as unreliable narrators, repetitions, movements in time and space, characters, multiple points of view, and more. We will pay close attention to cultural, historical, and political issues that the literary texts refer to. During the course, we will read a modernist and surrealistic Iranian novel, short stories by authors from Israel, Lebanon, and Kuwait, a feminist Egyptian novel, a Palestinian postmodern novel, and watch the first full-length feature film made in Saudi Arabia.
 


ENG 215
CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY
Section: 1
CRN: 19622
Larison, John J.

MORE - Moreland Hall 330
MW 1400-1550

In this class, students will explore the lives, beliefs, and art of the ancient Greeks through one of the most enduring works of world literature, Homer's The Odyssey. In our work together, we'll ask hard questions about gender, power, justice, and adventure--then and now. Finally, students will follow their own inspiration as they track the influence of this foundational text through contemporary film and creative writing.
 


ENG 216
ILLUMINATING HAPPINESS
Section: 1
CRN: 19623
Biespiel, David

MORE - Moreland Hall 330
TR 1000-1120

This course explores a set of questions posed by poets about living a more satisfying life, exploring poems that embody alertness to happiness, stress, joy, love, death, curiosity, imagination, knowledge, history, music, art, politics, psychology, and more, as well as how to flourish in the small moments of living and, even, how to live a more fulfilling life. This course raises the central question: what makes a satisfying life? This course explores the ways that many human beings think matter in daily lives, such as wealth, material possessions, even good grades, don’t and, instead, hinder well-being. Poets have long been interested in these questions. Poets have long been looking for happiness — what is it? where to find it? why it’s elusive? what does it mean? These questions are especially relevant for a detailed examination as students become more and more involved in making the decisions that will shape one’s future and the future of others. This course will develop your thinking about illuminating happiness. Using a set of requirements and re-wirements, students will explore poetry, the pursuit of happiness, and the human community. This course demands careful observation of both the assigned works and the life you lead. The course is designed to hone your concentration on details and the language that comes from those details, and I hope it helps release you into new ways of thinking about your lives. Our focus will be almost entirely on reading, writing, and doing, Monday - Friday, as if you are studying a new language.
 


ENG 222
CHILDREN'S LITERATURE
Section: 400
CRN: 19709
Braun, Clare

Ecampus

What counts as children’s literature? Is its purpose to entertain, to socialize, to indoctrinate, or something else? Who gets to decide where and how the boundaries around this genre are defined? How does children’s literature reinforce or challenge existing systems of power within a culture? With a focus on close-reading, we will tackle these questions (and more) as we examine the development of children’s literature over time, beginning with the first “golden age” of the nineteenth century and ending with our current “golden age” in the twenty-first century.  We will think about how conceptions of childhood have changed over time, shaped by and shaping the literature produced for children.  Additionally, we will look at children’s literature from the perspective of craft, investigating how literary devices and styles are used by children’s authors to influence the child reader in a myriad of ways.
 


ENG 254
SURVEY OF AMERICAN LIT: 1900-PRESENT
Section: 1
CRN: 18207
Malewitz, Raymond J.

MORE - Moreland Hall 332
MW 800-950

This course offers a rapid introduction to the key figures and movements of American literature from 1900 to the present. The key questions that we will ask concern the ways that we might categorize the large and heterogeneous output of American literary artists during this period. Course Learning Outcomes:
1.) We will examine the ways that American Modernist poets and novelists position themselves within regional, national, and international cultures.  
2.) We will examine the strategies by which post-World War II American artists depart from the forms, themes, and styles of their literary ancestors.  
3.) We will explore relationship between literature and cultural studies through discussions of race, class, gender, and sexuality.  
4.) Finally, we will examine emergent genres that may shape the future directions of American literature.
 


ENG 301
WAYS OF READING
Section: 1
CRN: 17567
Davison, Neil R.

MORE - Moreland Hall 332
TR 1400-1550

What’s the difference between reading a book for pleasure and reading it to analyze its aesthetics, themes, and political implications? What kinds of analytic skills are necessary for upper-level work as an English major? What exactly is literary criticism? What role does the structure and form of a piece of literature play in a reader’s understanding of its historical significance and implied meanings? We will ask and answer these questions by studying a selection of texts paired with works providing historical and critical context. Learn how to think and write like a literary critic by reading carefully, discussing these works in class, and writing analytical essays.
 


ENG 311
STUDIES IN BRITISH PROSE
Section: 1
CRN: 19624
Gottlieb, Evan

MORE - Moreland Hall 332
TR 1600-1750

This class explores a particularly entertaining and important tradition in British literature: the Gothic novel. Starting with the original Gothic novel, Horace Walpole's zany The Castle of Otranto (1764), we will read two more fictions that exemplify the flowering of the tradition in the 1790's: Ann Radcliffe's dignified A Sicilian Romance (1790), and Matthew Lewis' blood-drenched shocker The Monk (1796).We will then examine the three most influential Gothic novels of the nineteenth century (and probably of all time): Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818), Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886), and Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897). Finally, we will conclude by jumping ahead to a contemporary Gothic novel, Ghost Wall (2019) by Sarah Moss, to see what’s changed and what hasn’t. As we read, discuss, and write about these novels, we will focus on the evolution of their forms and styles, as well as on their evolving productions of effects of terror and horror (the affects on which the Gothic thrives). Throughout the course, special attention will be paid to the anxieties of gender, sexuality, class, race, and religion that these novels seem alternately to relieve and to enflame. Note on course content: Sexual violence against women is a recurring theme in the Gothic tradition. Many of the texts we read use the threat of sexual violence against women as an ongoing plot device, and some contain explicit (albeit not overly graphic from a contemporary perspective) scenes of sexual harassment and/or assault. I expect the class to navigate and analyze all such elements in the spirit of critical inquiry; if you would like advance notice regarding the specific nature and/or location of scenes of sexual violence against women so that you can be prepared for them, please see me in office hours or email me. Note on course credit: this class fulfills WIC requirements.
 


ENG 318
AMERICAN NOVEL: MODERNIST PERIOD
Section: 1
CRN: 19911
Elbom, Gilad

MORE - Moreland Hall 334
TR 1200-1350

Focusing on some of the prominent thematic, stylistic, historical, and cultural aspects of American modernism, this class will combine famous classics with important novels other than the ones commonly perceived as canonical. Through close textual analysis and active participation in ongoing discussions, we will examine seminal works of American modernism that have paved the way for previously silenced voices, paying attention to the rise of nontraditional authors, characters, literary strategies, and subject matters.
 


ENG 340
LITERATURES OF THE COAST
Section: 1
CRN: 19625
Malewitz, Raymond J.

MORE - Moreland Hall 334
MW  1200-1350

Introduces the diverse means by which literature and the arts represent coastal and marine life. The working thesis is that modern cultural artifacts and literary theories are reflected in and have the power to transform the societal challenges facing coastal community and ocean health. Explores the significance of such interdisciplinary translations through a variety of generic perspectives including poetry, short story, philosophy, creative nonfiction, and graphic narrative.
 


ENG 360
NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE
Section: 400
CRN: 19902
Hausman, Blake M.

Ecampus

This class studies a range of literary arts and cultural expressions by Native American authors. We’ll consider Native American literatures in their historical, cultural, geographical, political, and legal contexts. Throughout the course, we’ll prioritize Indigenous experiences, worldviews, and intellectual traditions in the study of Native literatures.
 


ENG 427
GLOBAL MEDIEVAL
Section: 1
CRN: 19636
Bude, Tekla

MORE - Moreland Hall 334
MW 1400-1550

Pre 1700, Pre 1800

In popular culture, the “medieval period” is generally cast as European: a time of Vikings, Crusader knights, and lily-white damsels in distress. In reality, the period spanning the fall of the Western Roman Empire (5th century CE) and the Fall of Constantinople (1453) was a complex millennium of global travel, commerce, and cultural exchange, far more heterogeneous than contemporary television, movies, and medievalising fantasy literature usually depicts. This class will focus on the multifaceted forms of global interchange present in this period. How do the literature, travelogues, and life narratives written in Europe, Africa, and Asia reflect a epoch of political, religious, philosophical, and artistic interpenetration? How do these texts help us to redefine our ideas about the medieval? And how do these texts shed light on modern discourses of the nation-state, debates about race and ethnicity, and the concerns of postcoloniality?
 


ENG 438
STUDIES IN MODERNISM
Section: 1
CRN: 19634
Davison, Neil R.

MORE - Moreland Hall 332
TR 1000-1150

Post 1900

This course examines intellectual, cultural, and aesthetic aspects of the pre-and-post-World War I era of literature characterized by the practitioners of its day as Modernist. Modernism from its fin de siècle inception onward was a pan-arts movement based on the overarching assertion that 20th-century consciousness mandated new “purified” forms for the arts to match psychoanalytic, gender, race, class, nationalist, and imperialist revisions of 19th-century paradigms of these or what Francois Lyotard later dubbed “master narratives” from a Postmodern perspective. As a studies course, we will narrow our focus to a study of Modernist fiction in particular from 1890’s-1940. Each work studied represents an example of formalist experimentation with former conventions of the novel, novella, or short story that was fundamental to the movement from its beginnings. We will early on trace this formalism as it arises from the overlap of the late-19th-century school of Naturalism with Literary Impressionism/Symbolism; we will also grapple with Modernist Free and Indirect narrative style, stream-of-consciousness, and a late version of Dada/Surrealism. We will examine how these schools represent subjectivity from psychoanalytic, racialized, gendered, and liberal humanist perspectives. Simultaneously we will study political and cultural issues that inform the era along theses same lines with the addition in some works of colonial/post-colonial discourse. Please note that this is an upper-division course: students are expected to have previously studied examples of Modernist literature and to have acquired at least a cursory knowledge of the movement (ENG 206, 214, or 318 are all viable but unofficial prerequisites). Undergraduates will be evaluated through a mid-term essay (7-8 pages), and a term paper essay (10-12 pages). Graduates may submit the mid-term paper, but will be predominately evaluated through a graduate level research/analysis essay modeled on the standard article in the discipline.

FILM 110
INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES: 1895-1945
Section: 1
CRN: 16570
Lewis, Jon R.

LINC - Learning Innovation Center 302
TR 1000-1120

Screenings: T 1800-2150, LINC 128

Explores and examines American cinema, 1895-1941, closely examining the important films and FILM makers of the period as well as key events in Hollywood industrial and American cultural (political, economic, and social) history. Weekly screenings to include: Sherlock Jr., Modern Times, Scarface, Stagecoach, and Citizen Kane.
 


FILM 145
INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES: 1968-1999
Section: 400
CRN: 18517
Rust, Stephen A.

Ecampus

Explores and examines American and European cinema, 1968-1999. Emphasis on important films and filmmakers of the era as well as key events in American and European cultural history.
 


FILM 220
TOPICS IN DIFFERENCE, POWER, AND DISCRIMINATION: QUEER CINEMA
Section: 1
CRN: 16569
Price, Zachary B.

MORE - Moreland Hall 330
MWF 1300-1350

Screenings: M 1800-2150, LINC 128

Queer cinema, despite its counter-cultural roots, must work within the larger movie industry it aims to critique. This class examines how queer cinema since the 1990s intervenes in public debates over the rights and representation of sexual and gender minorities. As a class, we will understand the stakes of this visibility and the consequences of looking closely at desire.
 


FILM 252X
INTRO TO SCREENWRITING
Section: 400
CRN: 20047
Turkel, David

Ecampus

In this class students will learn the basic components of screenwriting. Along the way, we’ll look at professional examples of documents intrinsic to the craft—coverage, story treatments, storyboards, script outlines, series bibles and production drafts for films and television shows. Students will practice creating their own versions of several of these forms and will be prompted to generate creative content through a series of “recipes” designed to teach the core concepts of: character, setting, dramatic conflict and visual storytelling.
 


FILM 399
SPECIAL TOPICS/ZOMBIES
Section: 1
CRN: 19628
Price, Zachary B.

MORE - Moreland Hall 334
MWF 900-950

Screenings: W 1800-2150, STAG 111

The course will focus on the figure of the zombie, a nightmarish creature that came from humble horror origins but has since overrun much 21st-century film and TV, due in part to its ability to condense a variety of social anxieties about what it means to live in modernity. We will examine the zombie by tracing both its historical development as well as the different techniques and technologies used to feed our seemingly endless hunger for everything undead.

WR 121
ENGLISH COMPOSITION

See catalog for available sections.

English Composition is designed to help you develop skills and confidence in analytical writing, and to foster your rhetorical awareness—your perception of where, how, and why persuasion is occurring. This 3-credit course places emphasis on the process of writing, including acts of reading, researching, analytical thinking, freewriting, drafting, review, revision, and editing. Complementing this approach is our focus on the final product—quality compositions that demonstrate rhetorical awareness and evidence of critical thinking.
 


WR 201
WRITING FOR MEDIA
Section: 1
CRN: 10912
St Jacques, Jillian

MORE - Moreland Hall 206
MWF 900-950

Fox News, Reddit, The New York Times. In modern culture, news bombards us from every direction. All the time. The news feeds never stop. Writing for Media introduces students to reporting news across a variety of traditional and new media forms, and participants will try their hands at writing in newspaper, radio, broadcast, blog, digital reporting and multimedia styles. Successful completion of the course requires students to conduct multiple interviews, compile credible research, and turn in publishable articles by deadline. Learning Associated Press Style is bedrock for the course. The final WR201 assignment is a photojournalistic essay, which requires a time commitment outside class. Reporting the news always necessitates intensive time management skills.
 


WR 214
WRITING IN BUSINESS
Section: 3
CRN: 15797
Roush, Stephanie R.

STAG - Strand Agriculture Hall 161
MWF 900-950

As college students, you will soon enter a job market driven by new technologies, a changed economy, and the need to communicate with different audiences from all over the globe.  The ability to write clearly and effectively for a wide range of purposes and audiences will be a vital skill in your future, regardless of your field of work. This course will develop your understanding of rhetoric, audience, and conventions to improve your communication skills; we will focus on the practical uses of clear and effective writing that can be applied to a variety of workplaces. Successful completion of Writing 121 is a prerequisite for this course. 
 


WR 214
WRITING IN BUSINESS
Section: 4
CRN: 10074
Roush, Stephanie R.

STAG - Strand Agriculture Hall 212
MWF 1000-1050

See above.
 


WR 214
WRITING IN BUSINESS
Section: 400
CRN: 11378
Schwartz, Samuel

Ecampus

See above.
 


WR 222
ENGLISH COMPOSITION

See catalog for available sections.

While continuing the concerns of WR 121, WR 222 emphasizes the development of argumentation skills and the control of style to suit a variety of writing situations. Students will develop skills through critical thinking; discussing the style and mechanics of good writing; and workshopping and drafting formal essays. You will also study the work of professional writers for inspiration and guidance in your own writing, and approach them with a critical mind. In your reading you will learn to adopt the habit of looking closely and questioning the reliability of opinions; to identify, evaluate, and use the elements of argument; to distinguish between observation, fact, inference, etc.; to discern invalid evidence, bias, fallacies, and unfair emotional appeals; to understand how assumptions operate; to draw reasonable conclusions based on induction and deduction; and to distinguish subjective and objective approaches.
 


WR 224
INTRO TO FICTION WRITING

See catalog for available sections.

WR 224 is an introduction to the writing of fiction. Our approach in this fiction writing workshop will be to develop your skills as a creative writer through several means: careful reading and analysis of our own work; careful reading and analysis of established writers’ work; the execution of several meaningful fiction exercises; and a constant commitment to revision. Assessment methods include creative writing exercises, quizzes and reading checks on textbook craft sections, peer review, and the evolution of a short story from first to final, polished draft by the end of the term. Successful completion of Writing 121 is a prerequisite for this course.
 


WR 230
ESSENTIALS OF ENGLISH GRAMMAR
Section: 400
CRN: 16088
Bushnell, John T.

Ecampus

You know grammar. It’s there in your head, helping you form coherent speech every day of your life. But how do you know it? How does it work? How do you translate it into your writing? Where, for example, do the commas really go? When should you use “whom,” and to whom does it matter? And is it really so wrong to start a sentence with “and”? This Ecampus course will answer these questions and many others, introducing you to the structure of sentences with a focus on beginning grammar, so that your own writing choices can be more conscientious and effective—whether you stick to the rules or not.
 


WR 240
INTRO TO NONFICTION WRITING
Section: 1
CRN: 13774
Instructor TBA

STAG - Strand Agriculture Hall 162
MWF 1600-1650

Creative nonfiction is the genre of creative writing that bridges the act of making literary prose--the crafting of vivid scenes, a thoughtful narrative voice, and meaningful formats--with the kinds of practical personal writing often required in our academic and professional lives. In this course, we will discuss several published pieces from the creative nonfiction genre, including personal essays, memoir, and lyric essay. More importantly, we will also write, edit, workshop, and revise several pieces of our own creative nonfiction. Expect a lively class with lots of imaginative prompts, free-writes, and hardy discussion.
 


WR 240
INTRO TO NONFICTION WRITING
Section: 400
CRN: 19711
Instructor TBA

 

Ecampus

See above.
 


WR 241
INTRO TO POETRY WRITING
Section: 2
CRN: 10849
Instructor TBA

STAG - Strand Agriculture Hall 261
MWF 1500-1550

“The art of poetry is ultimately an art of attention"—Michael Blumenthal. Throughout this course, we will consider the tools necessary to approach poetry more attentively as both readers and writers. This course will provide a firm grounding in the rudiments of poetic craft such as word choice, line breaks, imagery, structure, and other devices, as well as an introduction to different forms available to poets. We will consistently work through writing exercises and read / discuss the work of various poets in order to aid us in the generation of our own poems.
 


WR 241
INTRO TO POETRY WRITING
Section: 3
CRN: 12823
Instructor TBA

STAG - Strand Agriculture Hall 213
MWF 900-950

See above.
 


WR 250
PODCAST STORYTELLING
Section: 1
CRN: 19910
Griffin, Kristin

MORE - Moreland Hall 206
TR 1400-1520

In this class, we’ll study the practice and conventions for writing, recording, and editing nonfiction podcasts. We’ll listen to and analyze some of the best and most influential podcasts from the past few years—from Radiolab to Serial to Ologies—and see what makes that writing and recording successful, before we write our own podcasts. You can expect to learn the more practical skills involved in podcasting, such as audio recording and editing, as well as more complex elements like how to nail an interview and how to structure a multi-part audio essay to make it as compelling as possible. We’ll stress the importance of engaging multiple voices, developing a podcasting style, researching your topic, and appealing to your audience through narrative.
 


WR 252X
INTRO TO SCREENWRITING
Section: 400
CRN: 20048
Turkel, David

Ecampus

In this class students will learn the basic components of screenwriting. Along the way, we’ll look at professional examples of documents intrinsic to the craft—coverage, story treatments, storyboards, script outlines, series bibles and production drafts for films and television shows. Students will practice creating their own versions of several of these forms and will be prompted to generate creative content through a series of “recipes” designed to teach the core concepts of: character, setting, dramatic conflict and visual storytelling.
 


WR 303
WRITING FOR THE WEB
Section: 400
CRN: 15131
Ribero, Ana M.

Ecampus

Writing for the Web prepares students to produce engaging, informative, and rhetorically savvy writing for Web-based locations.
 


WR 320
NARRATIVE MEDICINE
Section: 1
CRN: 18059
Richter, Jennifer B.

MORE - Moreland Hall 332
MW 1000-1150

Focuses on contemporary poetry and nonfiction by writers who are also medical professionals, patients, and caregivers. Studies the authors’ different perspectives to consider the griefs and joys, concerns and comforts they have in common with their readers. Encourages a heightened sense of empathy. Explores the body’s struggles and failures, recoveries and triumphs. Develops a practice of thoughtful self-examination through in-depth class discussions and weekly writing prompts.
 


WR 324
SHORT STORY WRITING
Section: 1
CRN: 18093
Bushnell, John T.

MORE - Moreland Hall 334
F 1400-1520

Hybrid

In this intermediate course, you'll deepen your study of literary short story writing. With your classmates, you'll conduct investigations into the architecture of the best contemporary short fiction, then share your findings with each other to discover the intersections between craft elements such as description, conflict, and character. You'll then use these discoveries to guide and enhance your own creative work, first with exercises, then a full short story, and finally revision. Along the way, you'll celebrate the successes of your classmates and offer suggestions for improvement, and they'll do the same for you. This course features a hybrid of online and in-person instruction.
 


WR 327
TECHNICAL WRITING

See catalog for available sections.

Technical writing is practical written communication for a specialized need and a specific audience, typically instructive and/or informative, which may or may not be about science or technology.  Nearly all workplaces require technical documents.  Some workplaces hire trained technical writers, but in most cases technical writing is just one of your duties, often not even on the job description. Technical writing requires a problem-solving process focused on user centered design for a specific audience, purpose, and context, which is why it is sometimes called Information Management.  Information must be procured, packaged, and presented in clean, attractive, error-free copy for a specific audience.  This class requires you to present information in various documents, with focus on the writing in your field.  Research (both primary and secondary) is required.  Conferences and peer review will help. OSU’s Writing Center located in Waldo with an annex in the Valley Library provides excellent assistance with writing projects.
 


WR 327e
TECHNICAL WRITING
Section: 5
CRN: 10130
Elbom, Emily R.

MORE - Moreland Hall 130B
MWF 1100-1150

In the “Technical Writing for Engineers” sections of WR 327, students use an engineering communication textbook and engage with the course objectives and learning outcomes through engineering-specific activities and assignments. This approach serves two purposes. First, by focusing specifically on principles of effective engineering communication, the course builds proficiency in the kinds of communication practices you will be tasked with both in pro-school and in the engineering workplace. Second, your engagement with fundamental engineering concepts in each of the course assignments will both solidify and extend your repertoire of technical knowledge. In other words, participation in this course not only will help you become a better engineering communicator but will also lead to greater conceptual and technical fluency in your chosen field.
 


WR 340
CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITING
Section: 1
CRN: 16935
St Germain, Justin

MORE - Moreland Hall 206
TR 1200-1320

Hybrid

This course will focus on reading, writing, and understanding the dynamic and fast-growing genre of creative nonfiction. Students will gain experience writing and revising their own work, as well as participating in discussion and workshops of their peers’ writing, and reading examples from contemporary and classic writers. You will be expected to read up to 100 pages per week, to participate each day in discussion, and to write assignments or exercises every week. Please consider this workload before enrolling in the course.
 


WR 362
SCIENCE WRITING
Section: 400
CRN: 16811
Griffin, Kristin

Ecampus

Online Science Writing explores the practice and conventions for writing about science to a public audience of non-professionals. We will read and analyze some of the best and most influential science journalism from the past few years to see what makes that writing successful. The course addresses the practical skills involved in writing about complex scientific information and the models of science communication that those skills enable. Then we'll write our own news pieces and feature articles that communicate that information to the public. Students will explore their specific areas of scientific interest and work to inspire that same interest in their audience, both in print and online. Reading and writing assignments have been designed to help students gain greater insight into the issues and challenges of science writing in a variety of contexts. Successful completion of WR 121 is a prerequisite of this course.
 


WR 399
SPECIAL TOPICS: FANTASY, SCI-FI,  AND SPECULATIVE FICTION
Section: 1
CRN: 19968
St. John, Brandy

MORE - Moreland Hall 332
TR 800-950

A craft course on writing in the science fiction and fantasy genres, also known as speculative fiction. Students analyze contemporary, literary, science-fiction and fantasy short stories and novels to strengthen their own craft techniques. Supplemental readings include critical essays on the socio-political implications of these genres, and craft essays on structure, theme, and world-building. Students examine the ways in which these genres comment on our current social constructs and imagine new ones. Assignments include creative writing exercises on genre-specific elements, such as rules of technology or magic. Students apply concepts learned in a two-week, multimedia, group story writing project that incorporates elements like art, music, or technology.
 


WR 424
ADVANCED FICTION WRITING
Section: 1
CRN: 15799
Dybek, Nicholas

MORE - Moreland Hall 206
TR 1000-1120

Hybrid

This term we’ll continue to build on the skills studied in WR 224 and WR 324 by reading and discussing both published and student stories with an eye towards how the pieces are constructed and crafted. Our particular focus, though, will be on reading and crafting our own “linked” short stories—that is, a collection or group of  stories that can be read and understood alone and on their own terms but also work together to form a longer and cohesive narratives via such confluences  as character, setting and voice. By the end of the term expect to read three linked collections of published work and to have produced your own mini collection of at least three linked stories. 

Baccalaureate Core Courses Offered in Fall 2022

Cultural Diversity
ENG 213 Literatures of the World: Middle East
ENG 360 Native American Literature

Difference, Power, and Discrimination
FILM 220 Queer Cinema

Literature and the Arts Courses
ENG 104 Introduction to Literature: Fiction
ENG 106 Introduction to Literature: Poetry
ENG 201 Shakespeare (Elizabethan)

ENG 216 Illuminating Happiness
ENG 254 Survey of American Literature: 1900 to Present

ENG 318 The American Novel: Modernist Period

ENG 362 American Women Writers
FILM 110 Introduction to Film Studies: 1895-1945

FILM 145 Introduction to Film Studies: 1968-1999

Western Culture
ENG 204 Survey of British Literature: Beginnings to 1660
ENG 205 Survey of British Literature: Restoration to Romantic Era

ENG 215 Classical Mythology

WIC (Writing Intensive) Courses
ENG 311 Studies in British Prose
ENG 445 Studies in Nonfiction

Writing II Courses
WR 201 Writing for Media
WR 214 Writing in Business

WR 222 English Composition

WR 224 Introduction to Fiction Writing

WR 230 Essentials of English Grammar

WR 240 Introduction to Nonfiction Writing

WR 241 Introduction to Poetry Writing

WR 250 Podcast Storytelling

WR 303 Writing for the Web

WR 327 Technical Writing

WR 362 Science Writing

 Faculty and Instructor Office Hours: Spring 2022




Name Office Office Hours S22
Barbour, Richmond 324 By appointment only
Baunach, August 310 MW 7-8:30pm Zoom by appointment
Bennett, Dennis 358 MWF 1-1:50pm
Biespiel, David 228 TR 10-12
Bohlinger, Joe 338 Online and by appointment
Braun, Clare 236 MW 10-11 and by appointment
Bude, Tekla 222 By appointment only
Bushnell, J.T. 242 TR 1:20-2:50
Camacho, Karina 310 MWF 11-12
Conner, Roby 328 MWF 12-1
Davison, Neil 230 MW 2-5
Delf, Liz 204A MW 2-3 or by appointment
Detar, Liddy 224 n/a
Drummond, Rob 234 W 12:30-1:50 and by appointment
Dybek, Nick 204B n/a
Elbom, Emily 316 TR 11:25-11:55 and by appointment
Elbom, Gilad 232 TR 10-11
Griffin, Kristin 354 M 10-11 and by appointment
Harrison, Wayne 338 n/a
Holmberg, Karen 132 TR 3-4
Kelly, Kristy 208 M 4-6
Kurman, Nirit 360 email to schedule Zoom appointment
Larison, John 338 By appointment only
Lewis, Jon 312 T 11:30-12:30 and Zoom by appointment
Malewitz, Ray 340 on sabbatical
McGreevy, Sarah 356 TR 2-3:15
Moore, Walter 306 By appointment only
Norris, Marcos 314 TR 3:30-5
Olson, Rebecca 244 MW 1-2 and by appointment
Passarello, Elena 342 M/T by appointment
Perrault, Sarah 210 W 1-3 via Zoom
Pflugfelder, Ehren 212 W 11-12
Price, Zachary 348 F 2:30-3:30
Ribero, Ana 318 T 12-1:30 and by appointment
Richter, Jennifer 204D T 1-2
Rodgers, Susan 344 T 3-4 and by appointment
Roush, Stephanie 358 TR 11:30-12:30
Rust, Stephen 338 T 10-12:50 via Zoom
Schmidgall, Matt 338 M 3-4, W Before class
Schwartz, Sam 328 TR 1-2; 3:30-4 and by appointment
Scribner, Keith 308 M 3:30-5:30
Sheehan, Elizabeth 320 W 10:30-11:50
St. Germain, Justin 350 n/a
St. Jacques, Jillian 352 MW 12:15-1:15
St. John, Brandy 356 MW 12-1, F 2-3
Stone, Lucia 314 TR 11:30-1:30 or by Zoom
Turkel, David 306 n/a
Ward, Megan 322 R 1-2:30
Weaver, Damien 338 MWF 11-12, TR 4-5 online
Gottlieb, Evan 326 TR 1-1:50 or by appointment

Liddy Detar, SWLF Advisor


Liddy's teaching and areas of interest include memoir writing, Caribbean literary studies, feminist and queer theories, and story-based strategies for social change. Dr. Detar has also taught and advised for years in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. She coordinates the MFA Graduate Internship Program and directs “Social Action Works,” a professional development initiative that supports undergraduate students to explore careers that enact social commitments. Dr. Detar trains horses and riders in natural horsemanship, rock climbs, enjoys digital media, quilting, and spending time with her teenage kids.

“This is an exciting moment in our communities and in our culture for storytelling and the power of narrative. I welcome the opportunity to meet with you (virtually or in-person) to hear of your interests and share information about our programs in Creative Writing, English, Film Studies, Writing, Scientific, Technical, and Professional Communication, and Applied Journalism.”

MEET WITH LIDDY

Office: Moreland Hall 224
Or Join Liddy in her Virtual Office

Call her at: 541-737-1636
Email her at: liddy.detar@oregonstate.edu
Or Schedule a Meeting