Welcome to the School of Writing, Literature, and Film!

We look forward to seeing you in Winter Term of 2023. As you can tell from the lineup below, there are many exciting learning opportunities ahead. To get started, you can use this page to read course descriptions for the upcoming term and grab contact information for our Advisor, Liddy Detar.

We encourage you to read these descriptions carefully and reach out to course instructors or your advisor with any specific questions.

Course Descriptions

AJ 312
ADVANCED MEDIA STORYTELLING

Section: 1
CRN: 35438
Bhanoo, Sindya

This class will operate like a living, breathing newsroom in which students are reporters. We will, above all, cultivate a spirit of curiosity. We will consider how our own varied interests and backgrounds – as scientists, artists, writers, engineers, fans of cooking or skydiving, as people with experiences from across the state, nation and world - might inform the reported stories we choose to pursue as journalists. Together we will read and discuss stories from local and national publications including The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Oregonian, and NPR. Students will pitch, report, and write stories of their own. We will primarily produce written stories, but there will be opportunity to work in other forms (photojournalism, audio, and video) for those who are interested.

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of B in AJ 311

ENG 104
INTRO TO LITERATURE: FICTION

Section: 1
CRN: 30827
Schwartz, Samuel

This course reverses the notion that humans invent stories and posits that storytelling invents humanity. The premise of the course is that what we call the “human” is a negotiable designation that changes over time, constructed of boundaries that are susceptible to imaginative interventions. We’ll focus on particular types of stories— literary fiction of the last century or so, but biased toward more recent decades—featuring characters and situations that violate these boundaries and that do not play by the rules of our expectations regarding either “humanity” or “fiction.” We’ll read short stories and novels by authors like Kazuo Ishiguro, George Saunders, Margaret Atwood, William Gibson, Richard Powers, and Ursula K. Le Guin.

Bacc Core, Perspectives - Literature and the Arts (CPLA)
Liberal Arts Humanities Core (LACH)

ENG 104
INTRO TO LITERATURE: FICTION

Section: 2
CRN: 38960
Norris, Marcos

This course offers students a rigorous examination of the short story as it has developed artistically and generically in the Western world over the past two centuries. Primary readings include such authors as Edgar Allan Poe, Anton Chekhov, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Virginia Woolf, Flannery O’Connor, Ernest Hemingway, Raymond Carver, and Jorge Luis Borges. Secondary readings include selections from The New Short Story Theories, edited by Charles E. May. Students will develop critical stances on the short story as a genre, they will develop their skills as literary critics, and they will practice the craft of literary criticism, a genre all its own.

Bacc Core, Perspectives - Literature and the Arts (CPLA)
Liberal Arts Humanities Core (LACH)

ENG 104
INTRO TO LITERATURE: FICTION

Section: 400
CRN: 32461
Delf, Elizabeth
Ecampus

What is a story? How does fiction create or reflect the culture and historical moment in which they are written? Why do we (or why should we) read literature at all? In this class, we will build answers to these foundational questions. Using a critical lens, we will work to understand both the implied and stated meaning of short stories from across the last two centuries, as well as developing our knowledge of the key elements of fiction. We will discuss these stories in small and large groups, learn about the authors and the historical context in which they were written, and analyze them for a richer understanding and appreciation.

Bacc Core, Perspectives - Literature and the Arts (CPLA)
Liberal Arts Humanities Core (LACH)

ENG 104
INTRO TO LITERATURE: FICTION

Section: 401
CRN: 37285
Bushnell, J.T.
Ecampus

Understanding a story is one thing, but experiencing its impact is another. In this course, you’ll discover the simple routes into the heart of a story and witness how they’re enriched by more subtle literary elements. The goal will be not just to understand how fiction operates but to access its full range of emotional and intellectual rewards. By the end of the term, you will have received exposure to a broad variety of narratives, cultures, and ideas, and you will have developed the skills to appreciate their meaning, value, and pleasure. 

Bacc Core, Perspectives - Literature and the Arts (CPLA)
Liberal Arts Humanities Core (LACH)

ENG 106
INTRO TO LITERATURE: POETRY

Section: 2
CRN: 35616
Richter, Jen

Come one, come all! The study of poetry – its economy of language and its articulation of universal human emotions – is relevant to any major you’re pursuing. In this course, you’ll be introduced to a variety of published voices from the past and present, you’ll study the basic craft elements of poetry including detail, imagery, voice, and lineation; you’ll practice your close reading skills; and you’ll establish a routine of checking in with your emotions and deepening your sense of empathy. 

Bacc Core, Perspectives - Literature and the Arts (CPLA)
Liberal Arts Humanities Core (LACH)

ENG 106
INTRO TO LITERATURE: POETRY

Section: 400
CRN: 32771
Goldsmith, Jenna
Ecampus

Introduction to Literature: Poetry offers a broad introduction to the genre of poetry. ENG 106 encourages students to be more skilled and confident readers of poetry by introducing core concepts, showcasing dynamic living poets, and giving students the opportunity to compose in a personal creative process. 

Bacc Core, Perspectives - Literature and the Arts (CPLA)
Liberal Arts Humanities Core (LACH)

ENG 109
INTRO TO TRUE CRIME

Section: 1
CRN: 39845
St. Germain, Justin

From books to podcasts to viral Netflix shows, true crime stories have never been more popular. In this course, we’ll read, listen to, watch, and discuss prominent examples of American true crime works throughout the history of the genre, from Abraham Lincoln to American Vandal. Along the way, we’ll explore questions like: What is true crime? How true is it? Why is it so popular? What does that say about its audience and our culture? If you ever wanted to know everything about true crime, this is the class for you.

Bacc Core, Perspectives - Literature and the Arts (CPLA)

ENG 201
SHAKESPEARE

Section: 400
CRN: 36349
Olson, Rebecca
Ecampus

An introduction to the first half of Shakespeare’s career (the Elizabethan period), with attention to the print history of Shakespearean drama and the playwright’s continued global influence. Readings include A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Romeo and Juliet, and Hamlet; students will select a fourth play from a list of options.

Bacc Core, Perspectives - Literature and the Arts (CPLA)
Liberal Arts Humanities Core (LACH)

ENG 202
SHAKESPEARE

Section: 1
CRN: 40716
Bude, Tekla

This course is an introduction to the second half of Shakespeare’s career. In it, we will focus on close-reading Shakespeare’s language and analyzing his poetry within its cultural, historical, and literary context as well as considering how these texts are read and made relevant today. We will read four plays and will focus on problems of genre and form, class and race, nation and empire, gender and sex, and material textual history as well as performance theory. Class will include discussion, lecture, readings, and viewings.

Bacc Core, Perspectives - Literature and the Arts (CPLA)
Liberal Arts Humanities Core (LACH)

ENG 205
SURVEY OF BRITISH LITERATURE: RESTORATION TO ROMANTIC ERA

Section: 1
CRN: 34256
Gottlieb, Evan

As the middle part of the School of Writing, Literature, and Film’s survey of British Literature, this course begins with the literature of the late seventeenth century and runs through the first decades of the nineteenth century. As we examine the best-known writers of the age, we will read great works in most of the major genres: poetry, fiction, and non-fiction prose. Our challenge will be to understand these texts in their socio-historical contexts while simultaneously appreciating their aesthetic qualities. Grades will be based on attendance and participation, two exams, and a term paper; major texts we’ll study include significant excerpts from Milton’s Paradise Lost, Smollett’s The Expedition of Humphry Clinker, and Wordsworth and Coleridge’s Lyrical Ballads.

Bacc Core, Perspectives - Western Culture (CPWC)
Liberal Arts Humanities Core (LACH)

ENG 211
LITERATURES OF THE WORLD: AFRICA

Section: 400
CRN: 40252
Singh, Jaspal
Ecampus

This course introduces students to a selection of literature produced in colonial and postcolonial Africa: novels, short stories, essays, and poetry written by prominent writers on Africa, such as Chinua Achebe, Ousmane Sembene, Albert Memmi and Joseph Conrad and by other emergent writers, such as Kopano Matlwa and Safia Elhillo, among others. The texts cover a broad range of subjects and themes, including colonialism, nationalism, anti-colonial resistance for self-determination and identity, conflicts between ideas of tradition vs. modernity, individualism vs. collective identity, resistance for women’s rights, memories of violence and trauma, neocolonialism and class struggles in a colonial and postcolonial context. The subjects and themes will be read and analyzed from various viewpoints, such as race, class, gender, sexuality, all through an intersectional postcolonial framework.

Bacc Core, Perspectives - Cultural Diversity (CPCD)
Liberal Arts Humanities Core (LACH)
Liberal Arts Non-Western Core (LACN)

ENG 212
LITERATURES OF THE WORLD: MESO/SOUTH AMERICA/CARIBBEAN

Section: 1
CRN: 40774
Rubado, Annette

How is Latin American identity imagined and negotiated in prose and poetry? How do Latin American cultural texts use style to explore and contest relationships between self, community and world in the context of imperialism, dictatorship, and economic, racial and gender inequalities? We will address these questions through close reading of 20th-century texts from across the diverse geopolitical landscapes of the Americas. In addition to examining the ethical and political dilemmas proposed by Latin American artists, we will practice meaningful literary engagement with these texts and one another. While we read in translation, we will think through language and power. As this is an introduction, no prior knowledge of Latin American literature is needed. 

Bacc Core, Perspectives - Cultural Diversity (CPCD)
Liberal Arts Humanities Core (LACH)
Liberal Arts Non-Western Core (LACN)

ENG 214
LITERATURES OF THE WORLD: EUROPE

Section: 1
CRN: 37826
Davison, Neil

This course presents the student the opportunity to study some of the most aesthetically and socially influential literature to issue from the European Continent and Russia during the 19th and 20th centuries. All texts are read in English translations. We will first study a selection of works from 1820’s to 1890’s, such as Nikolai Gogol’s “The Overcoat,” Honoré Balzac’s Grandfather Goriot, Gustave Flaubert’s Madame Bovary, or Ivan Turgenev’s A Sportsman’s Sketches; the “decadent” poetry of Charles Baudelaire’s Flowers of Evil, or the feminist social critique of Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House. We will situate such works within the movements of Romanticism, Realism, Naturalism, Symbolism, and Impressionism, and discuss how these aesthetic conventions attach to political ideologies, such as Royalist, Liberal Humanist, or Socialist. In this way we will investigate how they also inscribe or confront 19th-century Western assumptions surrounding race, gender, class, and metaphysical truths. For our study of 20th century, we will focus on some of the most provocative, innovative, and politically radical fiction to issue from these cultures. Authors to be studied here might include: Italian Modernism (Italo Svevo), German Expressionism (Franz Kafka), French Existentialism (Albert Camus) Soviet dissidence (Boris Pasternak), and Postcolonial/Feminist/Nouveau-Roman (Marguerite Duras). We will also place works studied within the broader categories of Liberal Humanist, Socialist/Existentialist, Postmodernist, and Postcolonial. In doing so, we will engage the discourses of the individual human subject, race, gender, class, and religion through a 20th century lens. Students will be evaluated through a mid-term exam, term paper, and in-class final. From Balzac’s famous Realist assertion “Tell me what you own and I’ll tell you how you think,” to Ibsen’s insistence on the unconventional person as prophet (“a minority might be right, and a majority is always wrong”) to Kafka’s humanely sensitive cockroach, to Duras’ postcolonial exotic lover, this material represents some of the most important Western literary works. 

Bacc Core, Perspectives - Western Culture (CPWC)

ENG 217X
READING FOR WRITERS

Section: 1
CRN:TBA
Holmberg, Karen

Many of the activities we do as writers are processes of reading: we read for inspiration, we read as workshop members, we read with particular attention and care when we revise our work. Ultimately, our writing lives may involve reading as editors, reviewers, and performers. This course will give you practice in all these wonderful ways of reading. At the heart of the course will be methods of close reading and interpretation,
with an emphasis on how meaning is constructed in at least three genres: nonfiction, fiction, and poetry. Our reading will consist of editorial selections published in 45th Parallel, OSU’s graduate-student-run national literary journal. Here you’ll be exposed to diverse writers practicing the (widening) spectrum of subgenres: the interview, “flash” fiction, spoken word poetry, the podcast, graphic/comic literary art, the book review, etc. To prepare you for your creative writing curriculum, you will not only learn interpretive skills as readers but will practice what you are learning through short, low stakes writing exercises which ask you to adopt, adapt, and imitate the devices you encounter in the reading. Visits to the Moreland Print Studio and the Valley Library artists’ book collection will show us how form and visual space influences reading and interpretation. And visits by editors,creative writing faculty, and other writing professionals will give you a chance to learn about other writers’ reading habits.

ENG 220
DIFFERENCE, POWER AND DISCRIMINATION: SEXUALITY IN FILM (crosslisted with FILM 220) 

Section: 1
CRN: 35439
St. Jacques, Jillian

Non-binary. Genderqueer. Cis-male, pan and trans. How are sexualities constructed within contemporary cinema—and how do those constructions affect how viewers interact with actual human beings? That’s the central question for ENG/FILM220 students, as we closely analyze an array of films depicting intersecting sexualities for multifarious political and libidinal ends. Because decoding the distribution of difference within any cultural venue is central to each Difference, Power and Discrimination course, participants in Sexualities & Film do not merely evaluate the intersection of different sexualities—they will explore how these sexual subject positions are represented as further intersecting with other subjective vantage points, like class, race and age. Along with learning how to closely read films, students make connections with diverse and sometimes oppositional critical theories, including but not limited to psychoanalytic, feminist, (post)feminist, post-structural and queer theories. This transdisciplinary interlacement will serve as the basis for a generous amount of research, writing, group discussion and personal reflection.

Bacc Core, Perspectives - Difference, Power, and Discrimination (CPDP)
Liberal Arts Humanities Core (LACH)

ENG 221
AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE

Section: 1/400 (Ecampus)
CRN: 40721/40842
Norris, Marcos

Between WWI and the stock market crash of 1929, significant changes took place within the African-American community. Urbanization, industrialization, and the migration of six million Black southerners to northern states introduced a “New Negro” whose art, literature, and music came to define an era now referred to as the Harlem Renaissance. Foremost among these emerging art forms was jazz music, an exciting but also controversial new sound out of New Orleans, Louisiana based on syncopated rhythms and improvisation. The hallmarks of this new sound can also be applied to the literature of the era as writers and their characters would improvise unprecedented expressions of Blackness and Black identity that were sometimes “out of rhythm” with their post-Victorian worlds. This course examines 1920s culture, the early reception of jazz music, its relationship to literature, and the major figures of the Harlem Renaissance. 

Bacc Core, Perspectives - Literature and the Arts (CPLA)
Liberal Arts Humanities Core (LACH)

ENG 222
CHILDREN’S LITERATURE

Section: 400
CRN: 40709
Braun, Clare
Ecampus

Children’s literature has become a battlefield. Politicians and political groups argue over what should count as children’s literature, what its purpose should be, and what literature children need to be “protected” from. But these are not new questions, even if the debate around them has recently become more frantic. Embedded in these discussions are cultural understandings of what “childhood” even is. With a focus on close reading, we’ll look at the historical arc of children’s literature, from the “walled gardens” of the nineteenth century to the dystopias of the twenty-first century. We’ll look at how conceptions of childhood have changed over time, shaped by and shaping the literature produced for children. We’ll consider who gets to decidewhere and how the boundaries around this genre are defined, and we’ll look at how children’s literature works as a powerful tool to reinforce or challenge systems of power within a culture.

ENG 253
SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE: COLONIAL TO 1900

Section: 400
CRN: 40253
Hausman, Blake
Ecampus

This course introduces students to a body of works known as early American literature and covers works from about the 17th to the 19th century (a few selected works will be notably earlier or later). We will pay close attention to how the ideologies of “an American identity” were formulated and contested through diverse voices and experiences by covering genres such as travel writings, settler narratives, sermons, poetry, slave narratives, political writings, maritime literature, fiction, short stories, drama, and history. We will also examine the dynamics of early environmental writings and their implications in the policies and politics of land appropriation, capitalism, labor, the Enlightenment, and American exceptionalism. 

Bacc Core, Perspectives - Literature and the Arts (CPLA)
Liberal Arts Humanities Core (LACH)

ENG 302
WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE

Section: 1/2
CRN: 37829/40591
Ward, Megan/Bude, Tekla

This course will demystify the conventions of academic writing in the English major, with the goal of developing original textual interpretations and situating those interpretations in relation to secondary sources. In doing so, we will develop an understanding of a broader scholarly conversation by writing about issues of difference, including but not limited to categories of gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, class, and ability. In tandem with one-credit library lab co-requisite (ENG 200), we will practice evaluating scholarly resources, including secondary sources and archival research. 

Prerequisites: ENG 301 and 200. (May be taken concurrently.)
A minimum grade of D- is required in ENG 301 and ENG 200.
Bacc Core, Skills – Writing Intensive Courses (CWIC)

ENG 320
STUDIES IN PAGE, STAGE AND SCREEN

Section: 1
CRN: 39856
Davison, Neil

In line with studies-model courses, this class focuses on various topics, themes, genres, movements, and authors from term to term through relations of text, performance, and film. In “Hollywood in Novels and Films” we will examine how novelists and directors have often made the American film industry itself the center of their narratives, and in doing so, frequently become self-reflexive as to how the fictions or imaginaries of our culture are reconstructed or analyzed in the two different genres. We will also confront early on how adaptation may reemphasize, lessen, or completely alter the thematic thrust of a single work as it moves between the genres. Finally, we will examine key aspects of the 20th-century “American Dream” as it becomes essential to Hollywood’s message to the masses. By way of this focus, we will study novels written from the “Golden Age” of Hollywood (1930-50’s) to the era of the “New Hollywood”(1960’s-80’s), and finally films from the latter third of the century (1970’s-2000’s) that represent the second-wave era of the movie industry’s self-critique on screen. Students are responsible for assigned readings as due in accordance with the syllabus. Students are expected to introduce and grapple with background contexts (lecture and Canvas readings) in their interpretations of works discussed. 

Bacc Core, Perspectives - Literature and the Arts (CPLA)
Liberal Arts Humanities Core (LACH)

ENG 465
STUDIES IN THE NOVEL: FICTION IN A TIME OF CLIMATE CHANGE

Section: 1
CRN:39848
Gottlieb, Evan

For decades, we’ve known that the world is warming rapidly, with increasingly catastrophic (albeit uneven and unpredictable) effects and worse likely to come. Whereas Big Oil has denied and deflected, and politicians have dithered, artists and activists have sought to raise public awareness of global warming via a variety of media and techniques. Accordingly, fiction writers have begun to produce a new subgenre: Cli-Fi (Climate Fiction), which encompasses everything from realistic accounts of contemporary climate anxieties to post-apocalyptic tales of the world after environmental disaster. As it grows in popularity however, Cli-Fi faces a unique set of problems and challenges. In our time of the Anthropocene, which is teaching us (among other things) the long-term dangers of assuming that human needs automatically take precedence over other planetary considerations, should novels abandon their traditional focus on human psychology and behavior? Can they do so without losing their appeal? Which narrative strategies can best make a global process spanning centuries comprehensible to readers? What will it take for fiction not only to effectively reflect our current situation but also to begin to offer imaginative resources for surviving it? To address these questions, we’ll study several recent eco- theoretical approaches to narrative fiction, and we’ll read a wide variety of recent examples of Cli-Fi that may (or may not) prove effective at conveying both the perils and possibilities of life (but whose life?) in and after the Anthropocene. Authors include Fredric Jameson, Jenny Offil, and Kim Stanley Robinson.

Recognizing global warming requires much more than assenting to scientific data. Humanity has discovered itself to be implicated in a geological transformation of the Earth, with profound implications for nearly all our reference points in the world. If culture can be used to denote human styles of building, interacting with, and relating to the world, the Anthropocene also indicates a cultural transformation that cannot be described through a rubric of belief. Setting aside questions of fact, how has the immense discourse of climate change shaped culture over the last forty years? What tropes are necessary to comprehend climate change or to articulate the possible futures faced by humanity? How can a global process, spanning millennia, be made comprehensible to human imagination, with its limited sense of place and time? What longer, historical forms aid this imagination, and what are the implications and limits of their use? What is impossible or tremendously difficult for us to understand about climate change? How does anthropogenic global warming challenge the political imagination or invite new organizations of human beings to emerge? How does living in the Anthropocene reconfigure human economies and ecosystems? And finally, how does climate change alter the forms and potentialities of art and cultural narrative? 

Recommend sophomore standing; 8 credits of ENG 200-level or above.
Liberal Arts Humanities Core (LACH)

ENG 485
STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE

Section: 1
CRN: 39849
Malewitz, Raymond

One of the casualties of the “post-truth” world we all live in is our sense of a stable, agreed upon past that helps us to make meaning in the present. While polarizing debates regarding American and world history may seem to be a product of the last few years, similar debates crop up in a stylistically and conceptually diverse group of American literary narratives written after 1960 but set in the past. The key questions that we will ask in this course concern the relationship between historicity (the factual status of a given historical account) and these kinds of narratives. We will examine the ways that American postmodern artists recount the events and enduring effects of American slavery, the birth of modern capitalism, the Holocaust of World War II, and the Vietnam War. We will explore the ways in which postmodern skepticism towards “grand narratives” of history influence the plot and style of historical narratives. We will investigate the methods by which literary critics think and write about literature in the wake of this skepticism by bringing into dialogue historical, critical, and creative readings. Finally, we will contemplate ways that future teachers might integrate these ideas into high school and college classrooms to better understand our strange, “post-truth” era. Readings include E.L. Doctorow’s Ragtime, Toni Morrison’s Beloved, Viet Thanh Nguyen’s The Sympathizer, Art Spiegelman’s The Complete Maus, and a variety of historical sources related to the narratives. 

Recommend sophomore standing; 8 credits of ENG 200-level or above.
Bacc Core, Skills – Writing Intensive Courses (CWIC)
Liberal Arts Humanities Core (LACH)

FILM 125
INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES: 1942-1967

Section: 1
CRN: 36940
Lewis, Jon

An exploration and examination of American cinema, 1942- 1967. Of particular interest will be the important films and filmmakers of the era as well as key events in American and European cultural history. Screenings to include: Casablanca, Psycho, The Graduate, Bonnie and Clyde, and 2001: A Space Odyssey

ENGF - $20.00 Flat Fee
Bacc Core, Perspectives - Literature and the Arts (CPLA)
Liberal Arts Humanities Core (LACH)

FILM 145
INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES: 1968-1999

Section: 400
CRN: 38340
Rust, Stephen
Ecampus

Explores and examines American and European cinema, 1968- 1999. Emphasis on important films and filmmakers of the era as well as key events in American and European cultural history.

Bacc Core, Perspectives - Literature and the Arts (CPLA)

FILM 220
DIFFERENCE, POWER AND DISCRIMINATION: SEXUALITY IN FILM (crosslisted with ENG 220) 

Section: 1
CRN: 36939
St. Jacques, Jillian

Non-binary. Genderqueer. Cis-male, pan and trans. How are sexualities constructed within contemporary cinema—and how do those constructions affect how viewers interact with actual human beings? That’s the central question for ENG/FILM220 students, as we closely analyze an array of films depicting intersecting sexualities for multifarious political and libidinal ends. Because decoding the distribution of difference within any cultural venue is central to each Difference, Power and Discrimination course, participants in Sexualities & Film do not merely evaluate the intersection of different sexualities—they will explore how these sexual subject positions are represented as further intersecting with other subjective vantage points, like class, race and age. Along with learning how to closely read films, students make connections with diverse and sometimes oppositional critical theories, including but not limited to psychoanalytic, feminist, (post)feminist, post-structural and queer theories. This transdisciplinary interlacement will serve as the basis for a generous amount of research, writing, group discussion and personal reflection.

Bacc Core - Difference, Power, and Discrimination (CPDP)
Liberal Arts Humanities Core (LACH)

FILM 245
THE NEW AMERICAN CINEMA

Section: 400
CRN: 38341
Price, Zachary
Ecampus

This class will attend “New American Cinema” by closely examining important films and filmmakers of 21st-Century Hollywood (2000-present) along with key events in the business of developing, producing, distributing, and exhibiting motion pictures. There are no prerequisites for this course. 

Bacc Core, Perspectives - Literature and the Arts (CPLA)
Liberal Arts Humanities Core (LACH)

FILM 265
FILMS FOR THE FUTURE

Section: 1
CRN: 39851
Price, Zachary

An interdisciplinary study of film and philosophical visions of the future. Through a survey of Science Fiction films from 1980s-present, we will answer how new technological advancements in filmmaking and visual effects have come to influence visions of future societies. 

Bacc Core, Perspectives - Literature and the Arts (CPLA)
Liberal Arts Humanities Core (LACH)

FILM 399
STUDIES IN MEDICINE AND MEDIA

Section: 1
CRN: 40773
Price, Zachary

This course examines key historical moments of intersection between the medical profession and media production. We consider how a range of media depict the relationship between nations to doctors, doctors to patients, and patients to pathogens in different genres, from outbreak films to hospital dramas TV shows to fantasy video games. We will ask how these narratives have come to shape global policies and cultural understandings of health. We end the course by addressing media addiction, a recent diagnosis which points to our media consumption as potentially making us sick.

WR 121
ENGLISH COMPOSITION
See the Course Catalog for available sections.

English Composition is designed to help you develop skills and confidence in analytical writing, and to foster your rhetorical awareness—your perception of where, how, and why persuasion is occurring. This 3-credit course places emphasis on the process of writing, including acts of reading, researching, analytical thinking, freewriting, drafting, review, revision, and editing. Complementing this approach is our focus on the final product—quality compositions that demonstrate rhetorical awareness and evidence of critical thinking.

Bacc Core, Skills - Writing I (CSW1)

WR 201
WRITING FOR MEDIA
Section: 400
CRN: 34971
St. Jacques, Jillian
Ecampus

Blogging, podcasting, tweeting and seeding. Posting, boasting, ghosting and roasting. Whatever new form the media takes—and however its adherents decide to deliver their content—the post-90s proliferation of new media across the world of journalism has forever changed the ways we write the news. Still, the ethical tenets of newswriting remain fairly the same: accuracy, balance and an almost superhuman devotion to objectivity. Writing for Media participants learn how to write clear, concise, alluring news stories in any media form. Beginning with dynamic headlines, lead grafs and kickers, students progress to writing short feature stories and photoessays across a variety of media forms, including digital and multimedia styles. The following four missions are mandates for each successful student: 1) Write compelling news stories about real local events; 2) Conduct in-depth interviews with both expert and non-expert sources; 3) Compile research from credible sources, and; 4) Turn in publishable copy by deadline. Gaining a working command of Associated Press Style will prove bedrock for the course.

Recommend grade B or higher in WR 121 or WR 121H and 30 wpm typing speed.
Bacc Core, Skills – Writing II (CSW2)

WR 214
BUSINESS WRITING
See the Course Catalog for available sections.

As college students, you will soon enter a job market driven by new technologies, a changed economy, and the need to communicate with different audiences from all over the globe. The ability to write clearly and effectively for a wide range of purposes and audiences will be a vital skill in your future, regardless of your field of work. This course will develop your understanding of rhetoric, audience, and conventions to improve your communication skills; we will focus on the practical uses of clear and effective writing that can be applied to a variety of workplaces.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- is required in WR 121 and
WR 121H or minimum score of 1 in ‘Exam for Waiver - WR 121’.

WR 222
ENGLISH COMPOSITION
See the Course Catalog for available sections.

While continuing the concerns of WR 121, WR 222 emphasizes the development of argumentation skills and the control of style to suit a variety of writing situations. Students will develop skills through critical thinking; discussing the style and mechanics of good writing; and workshopping and drafting formal essays. You will also study the work of professional writers for inspiration and guidance in your own writing, and approach them with a critical mind. In your reading you will learn to adopt the habit of looking closely and questioning the reliability of opinions; to identify, evaluate, and use the elements of argument; to distinguish between observation, fact, inference, etc.; to discern invalid evidence, bias, fallacies, and unfair emotional appeals; to understand how assumptions operate; to draw reasonable conclusions based on induction and deduction; and to distinguish subjective and objective approaches.

Bacc Core, Skills – Writing II (CSW2)

WR 224
INTRO TO FICTION WRITING
See the Course Catalog for available sections.

WR 224 is an introduction to the writing of fiction. Our approach in this fiction writing workshop will be to develop your skills as a creative writer through several means: careful reading and analysis of our own work; careful reading and analysis of established writers’ work; the execution of several meaningful fiction exercises; and a constant commitment to revision. Assessment methods include creative writing exercises, quizzes and reading checks on textbook craft sections, peer review, and the evolution of a short story from first to final, polished draft by the end of the term. 

Bacc Core, Skills – Writing II (CSW2)
Liberal Arts Fine Arts Core (LACF)

WR 240
INTRO TO NONFICTION WRITING
See the Course Catalog for available sections.

Creative nonfiction is the genre of creative writing that bridges the act of making literary prose--the crafting of vivid scenes, a thoughtful narrative voice, and meaningful formats--with the kinds of practical personal writing often required in our academic and professional lives. In this course, we will discuss several published pieces from the creative nonfiction genre, including personal essays, memoir, and lyric essay. More importantly, we will also write, edit, workshop, and revise several pieces of our own creative nonfiction. Expect a lively class with lots of imaginative prompts, free-writes, and hardy discussion. 

Bacc Core, Skills – Writing II (CSW2)
Liberal Arts Fine Arts Core (LACF)

WR 241
INTRO TO POETRY WRITING
See the Course Catalog for available sections.

“The art of poetry is ultimately an art of attention—Michael Blumenthal.” Throughout this course, we will consider the tools necessary to approach poetry more attentively as both readers and writers. This course will provide a firm grounding in the rudiments of poetic craft such as word choice, line breaks, imagery, structure, and other devices, as well as an introduction to different forms available to poets. We will consistently work through writing exercises and read/ discuss the work of various poets in order to aid us in the generation of our own poems. 

Bacc Core, Skills – Writing II (CSW2)
Liberal Arts Fine Arts Core (LACF)

WR 250
PODCAST STORYTELLING

Section: 1
CRN: 40775
Griffin, Kristin

In this class, we’ll study the practice and conventions for writing, recording, and editing podcasts. We’ll listen to and analyze some of the best and most influential podcasts from the past few years—from Radiolab to Serial to Ologies—and see what makes that writing and recording successful, before we write our own podcasts. You can expect to learn the more practical skills involved in podcasting, such as audio recording and editing, as well as more complex elements like how to nail an interview and how to structure a multi-part audio essay to make it as compelling as possible. We’ll stress the importance of engaging multiple voices, developing a podcasting style, researching your topic, and appealing to your audience through narrative. 

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in WR 121 and WR 121H.
Bacc Core, Skills – Writing II (CSW2)

WR 303
WRITING FOR THE WEB

Section: 400
CRN: 36346
Ribero, Ana
Ecampus

The internet. We take it for granted. But I don’t have tell you that what we do online affects what happens in real life. From #BlackLivesMatter to gamergate, communication online can influence people and communities. Writing for the Web explores the implications of our lives online, with a particular focus on activism, social movements, and discrimination. Through readings, discussions, and activities we will dive deeply into the significance of writing online. We will also experiment with various online genres, including the personal essay and the video essay. Whether you are an avid TikToker or you can barely remember how to log into your Gmail account, this class will give you something new to think about. 

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of D- in WR 121 or WR 121H.
Bacc Core, Skills – Writing II (CSW2)

WR 324
SHORT STORY WRITING

Section: 1 (Hybrid)
CRN: 30069
Gomez, Brenna

In this intermediate course, we’ll dive deeper into short story writing focusing on flash fiction i.e. stories under 1,000 words. What does it mean to write a story in the most condensed form? Are we creating a punch in the gut? A slice of life? We’ll examine craft elements like detail, characterization, and point of view in flash fiction being published today and use what we find to enhance our own work, first with exercises and then with a portfolio of polished flash stories. Along the way, we’ll track our individual and unique writing processes to help us understand what works for us and what doesn’t. This course features a hybrid of online and in person instruction. 

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of D- in WR 224 or WR 224H.
Students with a term class standing of Freshman may not enroll.
Liberal Arts Fine Arts Core (LACF)

WR 324
SHORT STORY WRITING

Section: 400
CRN: 38817
Harrison, Wayne
Ecampus

Ready to get creative in an engaging and supportive workshop environment? In this intermediate online fiction writing workshop, students motivated to advance their creative writing skills will build upon a working knowledge of the elements of a fiction writer’s craft, including point of view, dialogue, imagery and setting, character development, voice, and dramatic structure developed in WR 224. Special attention will be paid to working in scenes – evoking emotion through dramatization, rather than through exposition. Students will study the narrative styles of a diverse selection of major contemporary authors to advance their own writing. Weekly exercises allow students to develop the beginning, middle, and end of stories, to work with imagery, and to listen for their own voice and style. In addition to these exercises, students complete weekly artistic and technical responses to anthology stories, write and revise two 4-page dialogue exercises and a final 10-12 page short story. 

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of D- in WR 224 or WR 224H.
Liberal Arts Fine Arts Core (LACF)

WR 327
TECHNICAL WRITING
See the Course Catalog for available sections.

Technical writing is practical written communication for a specialized need and a specific audience, typically instructive and/or informative, which may or may not be about science or technology. Nearly all workplaces require technical documents. Some workplaces hire trained technical writers, but in most cases technical writing is just one of your duties, often not even on the job description. Technical writing requires a problem-solving process focused on user centered design for a specific audience, purpose, and context, which is why it is sometimes called Information Management. Information must be procured, packaged, and presented in clean, attractive, error-free copy for a specific audience. This class requires you to present information in various documents, with focus on the writing in your field. Research (both primary and secondary) is required. Conferences and peer review will help. OSU’s Writing Center located in Waldo with an annex in the Valley Library provides excellent assistance with writing projects. 

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- is required in WR 121 and WR 121H or minimum score of 1 in ‘Exam for Waiver - WR 121’.
Students with a term class standing of Freshman may not enroll.
Bacc Core, Skills – Writing II (CSW2)

WR 327
TECHNICAL WRITING-ENGINEERING: Section-Specific Characteristics

Section: 3/10/17
CRN: 30103/31350/32588
Elbom, Emily/Roush, Stephanie

In the “Technical Writing for Engineers” sections of WR 327, students use an engineering communication textbook and engage with the course objectives and learning outcomes through engineering-specific activities and assignments. This approach serves two purposes. First, by focusing specifically on principles of effective engineering communication, the course builds proficiency in the kinds of communication practices you will be tasked with both in pro-school and in the engineering workplace. Second, your engagement with fundamental engineering concepts in each of the course assignments will both solidify and extend your repertoire of technical knowledge. In other words, participation in this course not only will help you become a better engineering communicator but will also lead to greater conceptual and technical fluency in your chosen field. These are Engineering Communication sections and are open to engineering students only. 

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- is required in WR 121 and WR 121H or minimum score of 1 in ‘Exam for Waiver - WR 121’.
Students with a term class standing of Freshman may not enroll.
Bacc Core, Skills – Writing II (CSW2)

WR 330
UNDERSTANDING GRAMMAR

Section: 400
CRN: 36348
Bushnell, J.T.
Ecampus

WR 330 is an advanced study of traditional grammatical forms with special emphasis on structures and functions. We’ll study sentence patterns, their required slots, their optional slots, their alternative structures, their modification, their punctuation, and your own intuitive knowledge of these concepts. In the process, we’ll gain the vocabulary to discuss grammar and linguistics, explore various (and sometimes oppositional) theories about linguistic “correctness,” deepen our awareness about language, and develop an appreciation of language, form, and style. 

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- is required in WR 121 and WR 121H or minimum score of 1 in ‘Exam for Waiver - WR 121’.

Bacc Core, Skills – Writing II (CSW2)

WR 340
CREATIVE NONFICTION

Section: 400
CRN: 40056
Passarello, Elena
Ecampus

Writing 340 is OSU’s intermediate creative writing course in creative nonfiction: personal essays, memoirs, travel narratives, and lyric essays. Any student who has taken a 200-level creative writing course is welcome to join the group. For this section, students will generate several very short pieces of creative nonfiction–”flash essays”--discussing and revising a few in small groups. Along the way, students will also read and discuss published examples of the flash form. Students can expect a lively schedule and a diverse reading list that prepares them to write about the world in many capacities. 

Prerequisite: A minimum grade of D- in WR 240.
Liberal Arts Fine Arts Core (LACF)

WR 341
POETRY WRITING

Section: 1
CRN: 37855
Richter, Jen

“Poetry is a river,” according to poet Mary Oliver; “many voices travel in it; poem after poem moves along in the exciting crests and falls of the river waves.” In this workshop we’ll study contemporary poets as models and inspiration; you’ll hone the craft skills you learned in WR 241 and challenge yourself to dive deeper into the revision process. Together, we’ll navigate that poetic river and see where it takes us.

Prerequisite: A minimum grade of D- in WR 241.
Liberal Arts Fine Arts Core (LACF)

WR 362
SCIENCE WRITING

Section: 400
CRN: 37297
Conner, Roby
Ecampus

Scientists and other experts understand their field, but they don’t always know how to communicate that understanding to the general public. WR 362: Science Writing teaches you strategies for identifying your audience so you can write to their interests and needs. You’ll practice research, drafting, and revision skills to hone your ability to write clear documents your audience can understand and use. 

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in WR 121 and WR 121H.
Bacc Core, Skills – Writing II (CSW2)

WR 383
FOOD WRITING

Section: 400
CRN: 40057
Griffin, Kristin
Ecampus

From the recipe to the memoir essay, the investigative feature to the food crawl, this online course will expose you to the booming world of food writing. We’ll discuss the classics in American food writing and read deeply in what’s current, from personal blogs like Smitten Kitchen to online magazines like Serious Eats to print magazines like Saveur. Once you have a sense of the genre and its possibilities, each student will become writer, editor, and designer of a new issue of Buckteeth Magazine, an online food magazine associated with the class and produced collaboratively over the course of the term. You’ll assign yourself a food-focused story, learn effective strategies for pitching it, and hone your revision skills, earning yourself a spot on the masthead and a publication for your resume.

See course catalog for registration restrictions.

WR 399
SPECIAL TOPICS: THE PUBLISHING PRACTICUM

Section: 1
CRN: 40877
Larison, John

Students can leave the Publishing Practicum a published author, podcaster, or content creator—or on their way to submitting a book proposal to an agent or editor. Through a customizable curriculum and individualized mentorship, students are supported as they conceptualize, pitch, and write/record their creative or journalistic work. The course allows students to choose between learning pathways that include: on-campus publishing with the Orange Media Network (Daily Barometer, Dam Chic, Beaver’s Digest, Prism, KBVR 88.7 FM, and KBVR TV); freelance publishing (articles, essays, reviews, etc.) with print or digital magazines; literary publishing (poetry, personal essays, short stories, etc.) with independent journals or “lit mags”; and nonfiction book publishing with major publishing houses. Students can expect a distinctive course that will prepare them to navigate real-world publishing opportunities. Students may retake the course for credit.

WR 411
THE TEACHING OF WRITING

Section: 1 (Hybrid)
CRN: 39853

Pflugfelder, Ehren

In WR 411/511, The Teaching of Writing, we’ll study research about the teaching of writing and practice what it means to assign, evaluate, and respond to student writers. This course is designed to introduce current and future teachers of writing to theory and pedagogy in composition studies, to help us become aware of and strengthen our own writing processes, and to enable us to make and express connections between classroom experience and composition theory. We’ll be looking at assessment, response, assignment creation, grammar, literacy, multimedia, process, and genre as we explore composition and writing. Coming out of this class, you’ll be better prepared to teach and evaluate your students’ writing and likely feel more confident in your own writing.

Bacc Core, Skills – Writing Intensive Courses (CWIC)

WR 414
ADVERTISING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS WRITING

Section: 400
CRN: 40312
St. Jacques, Jillian
Ecampus

TikTok, Vanity Fair, YouTube influencers and spam. All of these media denizens rely on one thing for survival: advertising. On the advertising side of the spectrum, it’s inconsequential whether their client is promoting fashion, soda pop or political activism—what matters is that their message effectively breaks through the clutter to reach you. By examining the ways in which content delivery interfaces with written rhetoric in advertising and public relations, students will learn to write for both fields. At first blush, these two fields might seem worlds apart, but advertising and public relations share a deeply intrinsic task: both fields deploy language to motivate target audiences to take a desired action. By necessity, professionals in advertising and public relations must be sufficiently adaptable to write in any media form that conveys their message most expediently. Through assembling (and critiquing) two multi-document portfolios – an advertising campaign and a press kit – WR414 participants will hone their skills at writing for advertising and public relations in an increasingly nuanced media marketplace.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of B in WR 121 or WR 121H.

WR 420
STUDIES IN WRITING: WRITING WOMEN’S LIVES

Section: 400
CRN: 38818
Detar, Liddy

Ecampus

How do we transform our lives from lived experience into written texts of many different forms: from autobiography, memoir, poetry, fiction to personal essays and academic writing? While challenging the very category of “woman,” this course explores what moves us to write the stories of our lives or someone else’s and how questions of genre and form are related to the stores we need to tell – and the narratives we must resist, about ourselves and our communities. We will read and discuss many different kinds of memoirs together, and writings and other sorts of activities will include both creative and critical projects.

WR 462
ENVIRONMENTAL WRITING

Section: 400
CRN: 40058
Jensen, Tim
Ecampus

From early conservationism to monkey-wrenching to deep ecology to climate science to indigenous rhetorics—this class will journey through a forest of diverse voices (while journeying through actual forests, too). We’ll explore how environmental issues get communicated—and why that matters—by reading works from leading-edge environmental writers, tracing histories of environmental writing in America, and by composing our own works along the way. We’ll learn how conceptions of nature, earth, and sustainability get shaped through communication and practice techniques for reshaping them through creative and critical compositions. 

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in WR 121 or WR 121H.
Bacc Core, Skills – Writing Intensive Courses (CWIC)

WR 497
DIGITAL LITERACY AND CULTURE

Section: 1 (Hybrid)
CRN: 39855
Kelly, Kristy

From fanfic to 4Chan, from cute cats to QAnon: the internet is a chaotic, compelling, and often treacherous place. In an information environment that prioritizes instant gratification, hot takes, and clickbait, how do we build ethical online spaces that value community, conversation, and authentic connection? By investigating the inner workings of interface design, social media algorithms, and how our attention is directed online, we’ll ask ourselves what it means to be literate in the digital age. Examining everything from algorithmic bias and online radicalization to data harvesting and misinformation, we’ll navigate the mayhem of internet culture with an eye toward social, racial, and economic justice.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in WR 121 or WR 121H.

Baccalaureate Core Courses Offered in Winter 2023

Cultural Diversity

ENG 211 LITERATURES OF THE WORLD: AFRICA
ENG 212 LITERATURES OF THE WORLD: MESO/S. AMERICA/CARIBBEAN

Difference, Power, and Discrimination

FILM/ENG 220 SEXUALITY IN FILM

Literature and the Arts

ENG 104 INTRO TO LITERATURE: FICTION
ENG 106 INTRO TO LITERATURE: POETRY
ENG 109 INTRO TO TRUE CRIME
ENG 201 SHAKESPEARE (ELIZABETHAN)
ENG 202 SHAKESPEARE (JACOBEAN)
ENG 221 AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE
ENG 253 SURVEY OF AMERICAN LIT: COLONIAL TO 1900
ENG 320 STUDIES IN PAGE, STAGE, AND SCREEN
FILM 125 INTRO TO FILM STUDIES: 1942 TO 1967
FILM 145 INTRO TO FILM STUDIES: 1968 TO 1999
FILM 245 NEW AMERICAN CINEMA
FILM 265 FILMS FOR THE FUTURE

Western Culture

ENG 205 SURVEY OF BRITISH LITERATURE:
RESTORATION TO ROMANTIC ERA
ENG 214 LITERATURES OF THE WORLD: EUROPE

WIC (Writing Intensive)

ENG 302 WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE
ENG 485 STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE
WR 411 THE TEACHING OF WRITING
WR 462 ENVIRONMENTAL WRITING

Writing II

WR 201 WRITING FOR MEDIA
WR 214 WRITING IN BUSINESS
WR 222 ENGLISH COMPOSITION
WR 224 INTRO TO FICTION WRITING
WR 240 INTRO TO NONFICTION WRITING
WR 241 INTRO TO POETRY WRITING
WR 250 PODCAST STORYTELLING
WR 303 WRITING FOR THE WEB
WR 327 TECHNICAL WRITING
WR 330 UNDERSTANDING GRAMMAR
WR 362 SCIENCE WRITING

 

 

Faculty Office Hours - Fall 2022

 

Austin, Kathy By appointment via Zoom
Baunach, August M 7-9 & R11-1 via Zoom
Bennett, Dennis MWF 1-1:50pm
Bhanoo, Sindya W 12-2
Biespiel, David T 8-10am & 12-1pm & by appt.
Braun, Clare Online only
Bude, Tekla By appt.
Bushnell, J.T. MWF 9:50-10:50am
Camacho, Karina TR 2-4 pm
Conner, Roby W 10-1 pm via Zoom & by appt.
Davison, Neil W 11-3
Delf, Liz MW 10:30-11:30am
Drummond, Rob   T 12:30-1:50pm & by appt.
Du Bose, Hannah TF 12:30-2pm
Dybek, Nick TR 1-1:50 pm
Elbom, Emily MWF 12-12:40 & by appt.
Elbom, Gilad TR 2-3pm
Gottlieb, Evan  TR 3-4pm
Griffin, Kristin M 2:30-3:30pm & by appt.
Harrison, Wayne Online only
Holmberg, Karen F 1:30-3pm
Kelly, Kristy F 10-12pm & by appt.
Larison, John M 4-5 & by appt.
Lewis, Jon W 2-2:50pm & 4-4:50pm
Malewitz, Ray MW 2-2:50
McGreevy, Sarah MW 10:30-11:45pm & by appt.
Norris, Marcos TR 3:30-5pm
Olson, Rebecca TR 1-1:50 & by appt.
Passarello, Elena By appt.
Perrault, Sarah M 11-12pm & T 1-2pm
Price, Zachary F 3-4:30pm
Ribero, Ana M 1-3
Richter, Jennifer M 12-1pm & F 1-2pm
Roush, Stephanie MWF 2-3pm & by appt.
Rust, Stephen MW 10-11am & F 10-11am via Zoom
Schwartz, Sam MWF 2-3pm 
St. Germain, Justin R 11-11:50am
St. Jacques, Jillian MF 11-11:50am
St. John, Brandy W 2-5pm
Stone, Lucia M 1-2pm via Zoom & by appt.
Uriarte, Emma M 10-11:30am & T 10:30-12pm via Zoom
Ward, Megan M 9-10:30am
Weaver, Damien MWF 11-12pm & by appt.

 

Liddy Detar, SWLF Advisor


Liddy's teaching and areas of interest include memoir writing, Caribbean literary studies, feminist and queer theories, and story-based strategies for social change. Dr. Detar has also taught and advised for years in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. She coordinates the MFA Graduate Internship Program and directs “Social Action Works,” a professional development initiative that supports undergraduate students to explore careers that enact social commitments. Dr. Detar trains horses and riders in natural horsemanship, rock climbs, enjoys digital media, quilting, and spending time with her teenage kids.

“This is an exciting moment in our communities and in our culture for storytelling and the power of narrative. I welcome the opportunity to meet with you (virtually or in-person) to hear of your interests and share information about our programs in Creative Writing, English, Film Studies, Writing, Scientific, Technical, and Professional Communication, and Applied Journalism.”

MEET WITH LIDDY

Office: Moreland Hall 224
Or Join Liddy in her Virtual Office

Call her at: 541-737-1636
Email her at: liddy.detar@oregonstate.edu
Or Schedule a Meeting