Schedule of Classes:

 

Course Descriptions:
Applied Journalism

 

Course Descriptions:
English
Course Descriptions:
Film
Course Descriptions:
Writing
2018-2019 Catalog
NEW!

AJ 300 Level

 

ENG 100 Level
ENG 200 Level
ENG 300 Level
ENG 400 Level

 

FILM 100 Level
FILM 200 Level
WR 100 Level
WR 200 Level
WR 300 Level
WR 400 Level
         

Looking for graduate course descriptions? Find them here.

Download the PDF version of this term's course descriptions soon!

 

 

NEW! Apply this course to the Applied Journalism minor!

 

Course ID: AJ 313

Course Title: Professional Practices in Applied Journalism

Section: 1

CRN: 59447

Instructor Name: St. Jacques

Day: MWF

Time: 1100-1150

Course Description: Specifically designed for applied journalism students entering the job market, AJ313 centers on a series of workshops, in which participants present, critique and revise their own job portfolio -- particularly resumes, cover letters and work samples. Because the Applied Journalism Minor is a fulcrum for development in all forms of digital and print journalism, work samples can consist of any completed projects in hard copy, audio, visual and/or multimedia journalism -- whichever field the participant seeks to enter after graduation. Attendance at field trips and guest speaker opportunities may also be required.

 

  

Course ID: ENG 104

Course Title: Intro to Literature: Fiction

Section: 400

CRN: 53193

Instructor Name: Bushnell

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: Understanding a story is one thing, but experiencing its impact is another. In this course, you’ll discover the simple routes into the heart of a story and witness how they’re enriched by more subtle literary elements. The goal will be not just to understand how fiction operates but to access its full range of emotional rewards, so that it operates less like a mental puzzle and more like a blow to the gut, a tingle on the skin.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

 

 

Course ID: ENG 104

Course Title: Intro to Literature--Fiction

Section: 1

CRN: 50423

Instructor Name: Dybek

Day: MWF

Time: 0900-0950

Course Description: The novelist Richard Ford says, “If loneliness is your disease then the story is the cure.” Though a well-told story certainly has the power to engage us, one need not be unhappy or otherwise infirm to appreciate the power of a fictional narrative. (I have it on good authority, for example, that Homer was quite cheerful and always a hit at the big sacrificial feasts!) But what is it about stories—fictional stories, in particular—that fosters this powerful, even curative, emotional and intellectual engagement? In this course, we will attempt to answer that question by reading and discussing several short stories and three novels with an eye towards how each is made, identifying and interrogating the author’s use of tools such as point of view and image. This attention to craft will ultimately help us become better, closer readers, able to pick apart the means by which texts illuminate and critique the mysterious world in which we live and reveal the surprising, familiar secrets that lurk in our lonely hearts and minds.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

 

 

Course ID: ENG 104

Course Title: Intro to Literature: Fiction

Section: 401

CRN: 56931

Instructor Name: Harrison

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: This online introductory course will examine literary fiction in the novel and short story form from the perspective of a fiction writer. Students will develop a critical vocabulary with which to analyze how successfully the assigned authors have fulfilled the expectations of literary fiction. Craft discussions will focus on literary elements that include characterization, significant detail, dialogue, voice, point of view, and setting, as well as figurative language concepts such as symbolism, metaphor and theme. Required reading will include two contemporary novels and two collections of contemporary short stories. The voices are wide ranging and represent a good sample of contemporary literature. Course work will include a mid-term and final exam, three quizzes and weekly reading checks.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

 

 

Course ID: ENG 104

Course Title: Intro to Literature--Fiction

Section: 3

CRN: 59450

Instructor Name: Malewitz

Day: MWF

Time: 1300-1350

Course Description: This course offers a rapid introduction to fiction—the central genre of literary studies. The key questions that we will ask concern the ways that we might categorize the large and heterogeneous output of literary artists over the last two centuries. We will examine the ways that genre classifications can help us to understand the forms and themes of individual stories. We will explore relationship between literature and cultural studies through discussions of race, class, gender, and nation. Finally, we will examine how artists draw upon or depart from the forms, themes, and styles of their literary ancestors as they experiment with storytelling.The student learning outcomes for this course correspond to the “Literature and the Arts” category of the Bacc Core. Students will:
1. Recognize literary and artistic forms/styles, techniques, and the cultural/historical contexts in which they evolve.
2. Analyze how literature/the arts reflect, shape, and influence culture.
3. Reflect critically on the characteristics and effects of literary and artistic works.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

 

 

Course ID: ENG 104

Course Title: Intro to Literature--Fiction

Section: 2

CRN: 59449

Instructor Name: Sandor

Day: TR

Time: 1400-1520

Course Description: In this course we will study several masterful short stories from the 18th to the 21st centuries, all of which, in one way or another, play with the idea of "the uncanny" in their unsettling explorations of human experience from the psychological to the cultural. We will focus on the way the elements of a literary writer’s craft--such as imagery and setting, point of view, character, tone, and dramatic structure--contribute to the reader's experience and interpretation of meaning in a literary work. Written work required: several take-home writing assignments, unannounced quizzes and in-class writing, a midterm exam, a final exam, and a research presentation.

Special Topic Title: The Uncanny Short Story

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

 

 

Course ID: ENG 106

Course Title: Intro to Literature: Poetry

Section: 3

CRN: 53182

Instructor Name: Biespiel

Day: TR

Time: 0830-0950

Course Description: For centuries the reading and discussion of poetry has been required learning for an educated person. Not only that, there are many people throughout the world who read poems frequently, even daily. To read poems for ten weeks in EN 106 with a group of fellow students from across the university, students with diverse majors and life experiences, is to participate in the highest ideals of your liberal arts education. It is to pursue appreciation for the basic human experience of metaphor and to enjoy thinking imaginatively, critically, and creatively for its own sake. EN 106 is less about solving the meaning of poems and more about exploring the questions of life that poems enter (and looking at how poems do that, too). With focus on the experiences of poems, poets, and readers, with focus on the public and private lives that poems explore, with focus on the pleasures of the arrangement of language and metaphor, and with focus on the cultural, social, political, and spiritual subjects that poems explore, students in EN 106 study poetry.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

 

 

Course ID: ENG 106

Course Title: Intro to Literature: Poetry

Section: 400

CRN: 53855

Instructor Name: Elbom, G.

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: Through a close reading of traditional and innovative poetry, we will introduce and explore a variety of poetic devices and forms. We will examine our poems from different perspectives, placing them in larger contexts: historical, cultural, political, philosophical, theological, structural, feminist, psychological, postcolonial, and so on.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

 

 

Course ID: ENG 106

Course Title: Intro to Literature: Poetry

Section: 2

CRN: 51977

Instructor Name: Holmberg

Day: TR

Time: 1000-1120

Course Description: This course provides an overview of the main modes, techniques, and characteristics of poetry through an examination of world poetry. Using the anthology readings and online resources, the course will cover world poetry by geographical region, and will feature 4 units focused on relevant topics or themes within world poetry: Poetics and Craft; Poetry as Cultural Performance; Poetry as Social Action and Historical Witness; Translation and Influence. During each unit, we will also study the poetic devices nearly universal to poetry, such as rhythm, sound play, image, symbol, metaphor, point of view, and tone. A poem translation project concludes the course.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

 

 

Course ID: ENG 107

Course Title: Intro to Literature: Nonfiction

Section: 1

CRN: 59452

Instructor Name: Passarello

Day: TR

Time: 1200-1320

Course Description: This course covers over a millennium of the nonfiction essay, looking as far back as ancient Rome and up to the world of contemporary humor writing and graphic memoir. Our guiding question for these ten weeks will be “What is an essay?” and we will note how it differs from the non-literary essays we may have encountered in other parts of our lives. Our texts for this investigation include personal essays, researched “public narratives,” criticism, and memoirs, and in encountering them, we will interrogate the ways an essayist’s specific attention to form, scene, and commentary contribute to reader experience and to our understanding of the “facts” of our world.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

 

 

Course ID: ENG 202

Course Title: Shakespeare

Section: 2

CRN: 59466

Instructor Name: Barbour

Day: TR

Time: 1400-1520

Course Description: This course treats several sonnets and four plays from the latter part of Shakespeare’s career: the “Jacobean” phase. Our primary goal is to sharpen our skills as readers and interpreters of Shakespeare’s work and its cultural energies. Our concerns will range from language, dramatic construction, characterization, genre, gender, and staging to wider questions of Shakespeare’s involvement in the economic, political, theatrical, and popular cultures of his day and ours. Our sessions will combine lecture and discussion, readings and viewings. Shakespeare's language is challenging—and richly rewarding. To excel in this class, students must keep pace with an ambitious syllabus, engage the concerns of the text, and participate in discussion.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts, West Culture

**Pre-1800 Course**

 

 

Course ID: ENG 202

Course Title: Shakespeare

Section: 1

CRN: 55331

Instructor Name: Bude

Day: MWF

Time: 1100-1150

Course Description: This course is an introduction to the second half of Shakespeare’s career, and will focus on close-reading Shakespeare's language and analyzing his poetry within its cultural, historical, and literary context as well as considering how these texts are still relevant today. We will read four plays and a selection of sonnets, and will focus on problems of genre and form, class and race, nation and empire, gender and sex, and material textual history as well as performance theory. Class will include discussion, lecture, readings, and viewings, and assignments will involve both short critical responses as well as opportunitites to creatively interpret Shakespeare's work.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled:Core, Pers, Lit and Arts, West Culture

**Pre-1800 Course**

 

Course ID: ENG 206

Course Title: Survey of British Literature: Victorian Era to 20th Century

Section: 1

CRN: 59468

Instructor Name: Davison

Day: MWF

Time: 1000-1050

Course Description: Have you ever wondered how Great Britain engaged with democracy, liberalism, technology, and race, gender, and class while it became the first great industrial power and largest Empire of the modern West? Have you ever been curious as to why World War I changed Europe forever and ushered in the Modernist/Postcolonial era? Have you ever heard of Oscar Wilde and how his outing as a gay man became the scandal of London during the 1890’s? Did you ever hear that James Joyce was an Irish writer whose artistic achievement changed the short story and novel forever, and yet who is now one of the most unread authors in the English language? Were you ever curious as to how former subjects of the British Empire in the Caribbean, India, or various African countries struggle to reform their hybrid identities and regain the cultures and languages that had been stripped from them by the colonizer? Survey of British Literature from the Victorian Era to 20th Century engages with all of these social questions while studying various literary forms of British writing from the essay, poetry, and short story to drama and the novel/film. Understanding the big story of England in the modern world allows the American student a unique and important perspective on our own culture’s global role in the 21st century—fifty years after we assumed many of those roles from Britain itself after World War II.

As the third course in SWLF’s British literature survey sequence, this class examines key works of the Victorian age (1830's-1890's), the Modernist movement (1890's-1940's), and the Contemporary/Post-Colonial era (1950's-present). This stretch of British writing includes works of such figures as Thomas Carlyle, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Lord Tennyson, John Stuart Mill, Robert Browning, Matthew Arnold, Charles Darwin, Oscar Wilde, George Bernard Shaw, Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot, James Joyce, W. H. Auden, George Orwell, V.S. Naipaul, Dereck Walcott, and others. As a study of the mid-Victorian Realist novel, we will view the 1946 filmic version of one of Charles Dickens’ most influential novels, Great Expectations (1862). We’ll read concise introductions to each period studied throughout the course, the central points of which will be expanded in lecture. Students will be evaluated through two mid-terms and a final examination. A short essay paper may also be assigned if the class desires a fourth grade.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts, West Culture

 

 

Course ID: ENG 210

Course Title: Literatures of the World: Asia

Section: 400

CRN: 56915

Instructor Name: Fearnside

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: Utilizing multiple perspectives—cultural, geographical, historical, linguistic, political, religious, structural, stylistic, thematic, and other points of view—students read, discuss, analyze, and write about representative works of fiction, both short and long forms, from Asia, with a special emphasis on the literatures of countries along the historic Silk Road. Texts will be examined in a comparative context and analyses expanded with the help of secondary sources. Involves reading modern and contemporary authors, formal writing assignments involving research, lectures, moderated discussions, and online activities.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Cult Diversity, Lit and Arts

 

 

Course ID: ENG 213

Course Title: Literatures of the World: Middle East

Section: 400

CRN: TBD

Instructor Name: Elbom, G.

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: This class will focus on modern Middle Eastern literature from multiple perspectives: cultural, political, religious, historical, geographical, linguistic, structural, stylistic, thematic, comparative, and other points of view. The texts on our reading list include a feminist Egyptian novel, surrealist Hebrew fiction from Israel, and a postmodern Palestinian novel. Among the topics we will discuss are different languages and dialects of the Middle East, different national and cultural categories, and the idea that the distinctions between these categories are often fluid and dynamic. We will also try to establish connections between Middle Eastern narratives and global cultural and intellectual ideas.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

 

 

Course ID: ENG 220

Course Title: Difference, Power, & Discrimination: Stories of the US-Mexico Border

Section: 1

CRN: 58052

Instructor Name: Ribero

Day: TR

Time: 1600-1720

Course Description: Through close reading and cultural analysis of stories from and about the US-Mexico border, this course aims to challenge conventional stories about undocumented immigration in the US and to consider immigration as a complex global phenomenon with multivariate causes.

Special Topic Title: Stories of the US-Mexico Border

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Diff/Power/Disc

 

 

Course ID: ENG 221

Course Title: African-American Literature

Section: 1

CRN: 59469

Instructor Name: Sheehan

Day: TR

Time: 1000-1120

Course Description: This course explores literature by African American writers. It begins with works by Harriet Jacobs and Frederick Douglass, which describe and defy the U.S.’s system of slavery and its configurations of race, gender, sexuality, and power. The course will then focus on three key periods in African American literary and political history: the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, and our contemporary moment, when artists and activists once again insist that Black lives matter and conceive ways of living and writing in and beyond the present.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

 

 

Course ID: ENG 230X

Course Title: Humans and the Ocean

Section: 1

CRN: TBD

Instructor Name: Betjemann

Day: TR

Time: 1400-1520

Course Description: An introduction to marine science and the history of humans’ interaction with the ocean, co-taught by Dr. Peter Betjemann from the School of Writing, LIterature, and FIlm; Dr. Susanne Brander, from Environmental and Molecular Toxicology; and Dr. Will White, from Fisheries and Wildlife. Lectures, group and individual library research, fieldtrips, and assignments will collate approaches from marine science, history, literary study, and other scientific and humanistic disciplines to introduce course material. Through fiction and non-fiction literary perspectives, students will learn about historic and contemporary ocean and coastal issues, such as sustainable fisheries and pollution. This course will ultimately enter the Marine Studies Initiative curriculum as a core requirement, but for now is offered for students interested in exposure to interdisciplinary perspectives on the oceanic environment.

 

 

Course ID: ENG 240

Course Title: Introduction to Environmental Literature

Section: 1

CRN: 59941

Instructor Name: Malewitz

Day: MWF

Time: 1500-1550

Course Description: This course is designed to rapidly introduce students to the key figures, themes, theories, and works of American environmental literature. Course-Specific Student Learning Outcomes
Students will:
1.) identify how American authors represent nature as a concept that exists within and beyond anthropocentric frameworks.
2.) analyze how nineteenth-century anxieties about industrialization and colonialism contribute to the first wave of environmental literature.
3.) assess how environmental authors depict contemporary environmental problems such as climate change, pollution, mass extinction, and environmental racism.
4.) describe the field of eco-criticism by examining how eco-critical frameworks can be applied to contemporary narratives.
This course fulfills the Baccalaureate Core requirement for the Literature and the Arts category. It does so by paying attention to both the “literariness” of each example of environmental literature—its unique structures and style—and to the interrelationships between a given work of environmental literature and its broader context within historical and contemporary environmental histories.

 

 

Course ID: ENG 254

Course Title: Survey of American Literature: 1900 to Present

Section: 1

CRN: 57779

Instructor Name: Helle

Day: TR

Time: 1600-1720

Course Description: This section of ENG 254 offers an introduction to the key figures and movements of American literature from 1900 to the present. The key questions that we will ask concern the ways that we might categorize the large and heterogeneous output of American literary artists during this period. We will begin by asking what made American literature "Modernist" after 1900, and will conclude with the ways that contemporary writers continue to adapt to and depart from literary modernist traditions. Our focus will be on literary texts, but there will be opportunities to study the relationships among literature and visual, oral, and cinematic texts. In addition to introducing students to modern American literary texts written between 1900-the present, this course is designed to teach vital skills of close reading for written and verbal literary analysis. Assignments require students to practice close reading and to make sustained arguments about the significance of texts, sometimes in relation to historical contexts.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts, West Culture

 

 

Course ID: ENG 275

Course Title: The Bible as Literature

Section: 400

CRN: 54557

Instructor Name: Elbom, G.

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: Emphasizing diversity rather than unity, the Bible is a vast collection of literary genres: stories, poems, genealogies, biographies, prophesies, aphorisms, laws, letters, and many other styles. This class will focus primarily on biblical narrative. Paying attention to a variety of literary techniques, we will try to address the complexity and richness of the Bible rather than reduce it to one truth, a single message, or important lessons. In other words, our approach will be analytical rather than didactic. We will try to broaden and deepen our understanding of the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, and deuterocanonical literature through a careful reading of the text and a close inspection of some biblical scholarship. We will also inspect samples from other related texts: the Epic of Gilgamesh, the Talmud, and the Quran.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts, West Culture

 

 

Course ID: ENG 275H

Course Title: The Bible as Literature

Section: 1

CRN: 57514

Instructor Name: Anderson

Day: MWF

Time: 1100-1150

Course Description: A survey of the major themes, forms, and styles of the Christian Bible, with an emphasis on genre and strategies of narrative. What is the Bible? How do the different literary forms of the Bible invite different ways of reading? How does the language of these stories convey meaning while also requiring interpretation? How has the Bible been interpreted in the past? Who wrote the Bible? How has the Bible been translated? How did the books of the Bible become the books of the Bible? For students of all faiths and varieties of doubt--those without any experience with the Bible, or those with great deal.. All are welcome, all respected. And the Bible itself: examined, explored, and celebrated as in part, whatever else it is, an anthology of important literary texts. Three midterm exams and frequent in-class writing.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled:Core, Pers, Lit and Arts, West Culture

 

 

Course ID: ENG 311

Course Title: Studies in British Prose: The Gothic Novel

Section: 1

CRN: 56558

Instructor Name: Gottlieb

Day: MWF

Time: 1100-1150

Course Description: This class explores a particularly entertaining and important tradition in British literature: the Gothic novel. Starting with its origins in the mid-eighteenth century, we'll then focus on two periods in particular -- the "Gothic romance" craze of the 1790s and the great "monster tales" of the nineteenth century, including Frankenstein and Dracula --- before reading a contemporary example. Along the way, we'll pay close attention not only to how authors produce effects of terror and horror, but also to how their ideas of what will scare and entertain readers reflect the changing sexual, social, and technological norms of their periods.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WIC

**Pre-1800 Course**

 

 

Course ID: ENG 319

Course Title: The American Novel: Post-World War II

Section: 1

CRN: 59910

Instructor Name: Davison

Day: MWF

Time: 1400-1450

Course Description: This is a survey of the American novel from the post-WWII era of the 1950’s to the present. During this era the novel in the West was influenced by the exhaustion, trauma, and absurdity of a Modern world that lost its moral center and nearly destroyed itself twice before the mid-century. The novel thus changes during this era to confront a Post-Atomic/post-Holocaust world. Artistic reactions to this led to the sensibility of Post-Modernism as well as to a rethinking of racial, gender, and class issues in America—even as it entered the computer/AI age. In this course we’ll study examples of the Postmodern novel, the multicultural novel of racial identity struggle, the feminist novel, and, finally a novel that engages with the internet/bio-tech/AI revolution of the last twenty years. Aside from understanding the particular thematic thrust of each novel, we will examine individual works as well as examples of the content and form of the various schools mentioned above. Students will be evaluated through a take-home mid-term, a term paper, and a final in-class essay exam.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts, West Culture

 

 

Course ID: ENG 321

Course Title: Studies in Word, Object, and Image: The Trojan War

Section: 1

CRN: 59471

Instructor Name: Olson

Day: MWF

Time: 1300-1350

Course Description: For centuries people have been retelling the story of the Trojan war in pictures as well as words. The story itself features famous aesthetic objects, including Achilles’ shield and the notorious Trojan horse. In this class we will review both Classical and early modern versions of the war in Troy, paying special attention to the way the myth came to be consistently represented in—and by—Renaissance art.
Readings include The Iliad and excerpts from Virgil’s Aeneid, Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Marlowe’s Dido, Queen of Carthage, Spenser’s Faerie Queene, and Lumley’s 16th century translation of Iphigenia in Aulis. In addition to writing traditional essays, students will have the opportunity to create and/or research modern retellings of this foundational Western narrative. Required Text: The Iliad, translated by Robert Fagles ($15 new paperback)

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

**Pre-1800 Course**

 

Course ID: ENG 345

Course Title: Intro to Literary Criticism and Theory

Section: 1

CRN: 52984

Instructor Name: Gottlieb

Day: MWF

Time: 0900-0950

Course Description: This course focuses on the study and analysis of critical frameworks and methodologies for the interpretation of literature and culture. Contemporary theory derives from the radical conceptual upheavals of the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, at which time four major Western thinkers – Sigmund Freud, Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Mary Wollstonecraft – revolutionized how we understand ourselves and interpret the world around us. From there, we read a wide variety of modern and contemporary theorists, including Judith Butler (on gender performativity), Michel Foucault (on surveillance and biopolitics), and N. Katherine Hayles (on different modes of reading on the digital age). What you learn in this course will help you not only become a better student of literature and culture, but also a more self-aware, critically oriented citizen at large!

 

 

Course ID: ENG 360

Course Title: Native American Literature

Section: 1

CRN: 59714

Instructor Name: Bernardin

Day: TR

Time: 1000-1120

Course Description: This course samples the innovations of contemporary Native literature while addressing the historical and cultural contexts that shape them. We consider issues such as tribal sovereignty; education and identity; place and belonging; and above all, "survivance" and Indigenous futures. Our course materials encompass short stories, comics, visual arts and film, novels, and poetry. We will skype with a few of the writers we are reading and meet at least one of them here on campus.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Cult Diversity

 

 

Course ID: ENG 375

Course Title: Children's Literature

Section: 400

CRN: 56905

Instructor Name: Braun

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: This course surveys a variety of genres, which may include fairy tales, folktales, fables, nonsense poetry, picture books, historical and fantasy novels, examining how these texts represent childhood and connect with historical, cultural, and psychological contexts.

What counts as children’s literature? Is its purpose to entertain, to socialize, to indoctrinate, or something else? In this class, we will tackle these questions (and more) as we examine the development of children’s literature over time, beginning with the first “golden age” of the nineteenth century and ending with our current “golden age” in the twenty-first century. We will think about how conceptions of childhood have changed over time, shaped by and shaping the literature produced for children. Additionally, we will look at children’s literature from the perspective of craft, investigating how literary devices and styles are used by children’s authors to influence the child reader in a myriad of ways.

 

 

Course ID: ENG 435

Course Title: Studies in Shakespeare

Section: 1

CRN: 59473

Instructor Name: Barbour

Day: TR

Time: 1000-1120

Course Description: The important presence of the ocean throughout Shakespeare’s works grants us an especially rich opportunity to historicize the sea while also enriching our understanding of the playwright’s engagement with, and artful repurposing of, the ocean as a force of both nature and culture. For Shakespeare, the sea is both a great wind-driven watery expanse and a mysterious transnational medium of exchange and transformation. Taking impetus from the recent “bluing” of environmental and “green” studies, this course will apply ecocritical to oceanic concerns while exploring the human uses of the sea in Shakespeare’s day and ours. Along with a few sonnets, excerpts from several plays, early modern texts that describe and theorize the ocean, and selected essays of literary criticism, we will concentrate on The Merchant of Venice, Pericles, and The Tempest. Course requirements include a class presentation, a critical essay, a research paper, and a final exam.

**Pre-1800 Course**

 

 

Course ID: ENG 470

Course Title: Critical Reviewing: Writing & Publishing Book Reviews

Section: 1

CRN: 59484

Instructor Name: Biespiel

Day: TR

Time: 1200-1320

Course Description:This course offers students an inside track to writing and publishing book reviews about new fiction, memoir, creative nonfiction, journalism, literary studies, history, poetry, and more. What is the role of the book reviewer? What is the role of book reviews? What are the latest issues, opportunities, and pitfalls facing the contemporary book critic? We’ll be studying various lengths for reviewing books and practicing these approaches. We’ll be getting to know the book reviewing landscape, from online to print, as well as assessing the growth of book reviewing in contemporary literary culture. We’ll be meeting via Skype with current and former book review editors of major periodicals who can offer insights about the landscape of writing about books for publication—including telling us “what they’re looking for in a book review.” Above all, our primary focus will be writing dynamic, readable, thoughtful book reviews. Practical applications include: querying editors of publications, developing strategies for writing and placing reviews, and handing the writing of shorter vs. longer reviews. Students should prepare for a lively, discussion-focused class with several writing assignments, writing experiments, creative revision, and, for the graduates, presentation about book+reviews of recent publications.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WIC

 

 

Course ID: ENG 488

Course Title: Literature and Pedagogy

Section: 1

CRN: 56560

Instructor Name: Helle

Day: TR

Time: 1200-1320

Course Description: Literature and Pedagogy is designed for students who may be interested in teaching college or secondary English classes in reading and literary studies. Topics to be considered: reading/writing connections; “transactions” with flesh-and-blood readers, writers, texts, and contexts; affect, empathy, and emotion in pedagogy; cultural and critical pedagogies; reading complex texts; teaching graphic novels. We will study these topics through workshop “practices” in reading/writing connections that model challenges and opportunities of everyday pedagogy and case studies of theory-into-practice.

**This course fulfills the Education Double Degree pedagogy requirement.**

 

 

Course ID: FILM 110

Course Title: Intro to Film Studies: 1895-1945

Section: 1

CRN: 59715

Instructor Name: Lewis

Day: TR lectures
T screenings

Time: 1400-1520
1800-2150

Course Description: This course surveys American film history from early experiments at the end of the 19th century through the end of 1941 and the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor that signaled the U.S. entrance into WW II. Several of the evening screenings will feature live music performed by the keyboardist Dana Reason.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts, West Culture

 

 

Course ID: FILM 245

Course Title: New American Cinema

Section: 400

CRN: 56081

Instructor Name: Rust

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: This class will explore and analyze post-rating system Hollywood (1968-present) by closely examining the important films and filmmakers of the period along with key events in the business of developing, producing, distributing, and exhibiting motion pictures. Students will lear  There are no prerequisites for this course; however, please keep in mind that this is an ambitious 200-level academic course, not a film appreciation class. 

 

 

Course ID: FILM 256

Course Title: World Cinema Part II: 1968-Present

Section: 400

CRN: 57625

Instructor Name: Zuo

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: This course surveys a broad range of non-western art cinemas produced in the modern era. We will discuss significant genres, movements, and authors in conjunction with important historical, industrial, and socio-political developments that impacted national cinemas across Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America. Beginning after the “long decade” of the 1960s and ending in the present day, we will examine the growth of new artistic cinemas produced out of continually changing contexts of transnational filmmaking and globalization. Key filmmakers we include: Wong Kar-wai, Hou Hsiao-hsien, Abbas Kiorastami, Mira Nair, Takeshi Kitano, Souleymane Cissé, and Alfonso Cuaron.

Special Topic Title: Contemporary Non-Western Art Cinemas

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

 

 

Course ID: FILM 265

Course Title: Films for the Future

Section: 1

CRN: TBD

Instructor Name: Elbom, G.

Day: MWF lecture
W screen

Time: 1600-1650
1700-1950

Course Description: This course examines some of the most prominent thematic concerns that futuristic narratives, both textual and visual, have been wrestling with for the last 100 years. We will pay special attention to the transition from notions, imagined or real, of order, stability, and an objective reality to a future marked by anxiety, uncertainty, political and social unrest, subjective experiences, alternative realities, and idiosyncratic modes of perception. Through a close analysis of influential movies, novels, and scholarly sources, we will try to come up with original observations on genre, design, narrative strategies, gender relations, intercultural contact, utopia and dystopia, sexual liberation, minority rights, artificial intelligence, human-computer interaction, labor-saving devices, and other important issues.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

 

 

Course ID: WR121

Course Title: ENGLISH COMPOSITION

See the Course Catalog for available sections.

Course Description: WR 121 is designed to help students develop skills and confidence in analytical writing. It also emphasizes rhetorical awareness—the perception of where, how, and why persuasion is occurring. This section offers the unique opportunity for collaboration with the Valley Library’s Special Collections and Archives Research Center. Students will engage directly with materials from the University’s collections in the process of writing a high-quality, researched academic essay. Assignments and in-class activities will emphasize and explore the process of writing, including acts of reading, researching, analytical thinking, freewriting, drafting, review, revision, and editing.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Writing I

   

 

Course ID: WR 201

Course Title: Writing for Media

Section: 2

CRN: 51307

Instructor Name: Elbom, E.

Day: MWF

Time: 1200-1250

Course Description: WR201 Writing for Media introduces students to reporting news across traditional and new media forms. Students compose stories in newspaper, radio, broadcast, blog, digital reporting and multimedia styles. The course requires students to conduct interviews, compile research, and turn in publishable articles by deadline. The final assignment in this course (the multimedia package), is a team assignment and will require scheduling time outside of class for its completion (there will also be some class work days, but to “get” the story, the team will have to go outside of class and into the community).

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

 

 

Course ID: WR 201

Course Title: Writing for Media

Section: 4

CRN: 53421

Instructor Name: St. Jacques

Day: MWF

Time: 1400-1450

Course Description: WR201 Writing for Media introduces students to reporting news across traditional and new media forms. Students compose stories in newspaper, radio, broadcast, blog, digital reporting and multimedia styles. The course requires students to conduct interviews, compile research, and turn in publishable articles by deadline. The final assignment in this course (the multimedia package), is a group assignment and will require scheduling time outside of class for its completion.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

 

 

Course ID: WR214

Course Title: BUSINESS WRITING

See the Course Catalog for available sections.

Course Description: Thoughtful and thorough communication across multiple audiences and for multiple purposes continues to be an extremely important skill set in business. Writing in Business helps you build these skills and makes use of different networked technologies, software, and online materials in order to broaden your understanding of where, why, and how writing in the workplace happens. You’ll learn the principles and practices necessary for writing ethical and effective business letters, memos, and reports for a range of professional contexts. WR 214 will also help you present yourself as a professional, research job opportunities, write materials for job applications, and then land the position you want. The work you’ll do in this course is informed by current research in rhetoric and professional writing and is guided by the needs and practices of business, industry, and society at large.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Writing II

   

 

Course ID: WR222

Course Title: ENGLISH COMPOSITION

See the Course Catalog for available sections.

Course Description: Argument may seem like a simple word; it’s anything but. One look at the title of your textbook supports that claim. Arguments live in everything we see, think and do. They can be as overt as a Presidential debate and as subtle as a paint color. When you start seeing argumentation in this way, the possibilities are endless. As varied as arguments come, there are tried and true constants in the analysis and crafting of their myriad messages. Arguments are conversations. There is more than one voice in the room. They are grounded in the art of persuasion. They succeed and fail on an understanding of audience. In this course, you will learn the basics of what goes into good argumentative writing through extensive reading, analyzing, brain storming, peer reviewing, revising, debating and (of course) writing. You will develop strategies to help you interpret a variety of texts and compose in a variety of media. This course will show you how a sound argument moves, considering structure, support and form. You will improve your ability to revise your ideas, the reasoning that supports those ideas, and the writing that illustrates them.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Writing II

 

 

Course ID: WR 222

Course Title: English Composition for Psychology

Section: 2

CRN: 50455

Instructor Name: Drummond

Day: TR

Time: 0830-0950

Course Description: These specialized sections of WR 222 will continue practice in expository writing with an emphasis on argumentation and research specifically for Psychology Majors. (Bacc Core Course) PREREQS: WR 121 [C-] or WR 121H [C-] or Placement Test WWRI(1) Course Description: Arguments live in everything we see, think, and do. They can be as overt as an intense debate and as subtle as a paint color. As varied as arguments come, there are tried and true constants in the analysis and crafting of their myriad messages. Arguments are grounded in the art of persuasion, and they succeed and fail on an understanding of audience. In this course, you will learn the basics of what goes into good argumentative writing through extensive reading, analyzing, and writing. In addition, this section of WR 222 is specific to Psychology majors; students will gain additional preparation for making arguments in the Psychology major, including writing approaches, research and reading techniques, and APA style. BACC Core Fulfillment: Writing ll

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

 

 

Course ID: WR 222

Course Title: English Composition for Psychology

Section: 14

CRN: 52991

Instructor Name: Drummond

Day: TR

Time: 1400-1520

Course Description: These specialized sections of WR 222 will continue practice in expository writing with an emphasis on argumentation and research specifically for Psychology Majors. (Bacc Core Course) PREREQS: WR 121 [C-] or WR 121H [C-] or Placement Test WWRI(1) Course Description: Arguments live in everything we see, think, and do. They can be as overt as an intense debate and as subtle as a paint color. As varied as arguments come, there are tried and true constants in the analysis and crafting of their myriad messages. Arguments are grounded in the art of persuasion, and they succeed and fail on an understanding of audience. In this course, you will learn the basics of what goes into good argumentative writing through extensive reading, analyzing, and writing. In addition, this section of WR 222 is specific to Psychology majors; students will gain additional preparation for making arguments in the Psychology major, including writing approaches, research and reading techniques, and APA style. BACC Core Fulfillment: Writing ll

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

 

   

Course ID: WR 224

Course Title: Intro to Fiction Writing

Section: 401

CRN: 58051

Instructor Name: Drummond

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: WR 224 is an introduction to the writing of fiction. Our approach in this online fiction writing workshop will be to develop your skills as a creative writer through several means: careful reading and analysis of our own work; careful reading and analysis of established writers’ work; the execution of several meaningful fiction exercises; and a constant commitment to revision. Assessment methods include creative writing exercises, quizzes and reading checks on textbook craft sections, peer review, and the evolution of a short story from first to final, polished draft by the end of the term. Successful completion of Writing 121 is a prerequisite for this course. 

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

 

 

Course ID: WR 224

Course Title: Intro to Fiction Writing

Section: 402

CRN: 59734

Instructor Name: Drummond

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: WR 224 is an introduction to the writing of fiction. Our approach in this online fiction writing workshop will be to develop your skills as a creative writer through several means: careful reading and analysis of our own work; careful reading and analysis of established writers’ work; the execution of several meaningful fiction exercises; and a constant commitment to revision. Assessment methods include creative writing exercises, quizzes and reading checks on textbook craft sections, peer review, and the evolution of a short story from first to final, polished draft by the end of the term. Successful completion of Writing 121 is a prerequisite for this course. 

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

 

 

Course ID: WR 224

Course Title: Intro to Fiction Writing

Section: 2

CRN: 50458

Instructor Name: Griffin

Day: TR

Time: 1000-1120

Course Description: This class is an introduction to the study and practice of fiction writing. It focuses exclusively on the analysis and composition of short stories. In the first half of the course, we’ll be reading deeply in the genre from a diverse list of writers working today and learning the foundations of the craft. In the second half, students take the reins. Each of you will write your own short stories and the majority of what we read and discuss in class will be your work. This process is designed to prepare you for the final assignment: a portfolio showcasing your progression as a writer during our time together, with special emphasis placed on revision.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

 

 

Course ID: WR 224

Course Title: Intro to Fiction Writing

Section: 400

CRN: 52472

Instructor Name: Harrison

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: This online fiction writing workshop examines the basic techniques of fiction, with related writing exercises. We will discuss literary craft elements that include characterization, significant detail, dialogue, voice, point of view, tone, pacing and setting, as well as figurative language concepts such as symbolism, metaphor and theme. Students will develop a critical vocabulary with which to analyze how successfully fiction meets the expectations of literature. Students will study the work of professional fiction writers and apply the principles of contemporary fiction to their own writing to establish dimensional characters and plotlines, and to create dialogue that is rich and revealing; they will explore aspects of narrative, point of view, tone, pacing, plot, theme to develop a satisfying short story. They will also critique the creative work of their fellow students in weekly peer review workshops. Assessment methods include creative writing exercises, quizzes and reading checks on textbook craft sections, peer review, and the evolution of a short story from rough draft to an 8-10 page final draft that meets the structural and thematic qualifications of literature.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

 

 

Course ID: WR240

Course Title: INTRO TO NONFICTION WRITING

See the Course Catalog for available sections.

Course Description: Creative nonfiction is the genre of creative writing that bridges the act of making literary prose--the crafting of vivid scenes, a thoughtful narrative voice, and meaningful formats--with the kinds of practical personal writing often required in our academic and professional lives. In this course, we will discuss several published pieces from the creative nonfiction genre, including personal essays, memoir, and lyric essay. More importantly, we will also write, edit, workshop, and revise several pieces of our own creative nonfiction. Expect a lively class with lots of imaginative prompts, free-writes, and hardy discussion.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Writing II

  

 

Course ID: WR 301

Course Title: Publishing & Editing

Section: 400

CRN: 58063

Instructor Name: Love

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: This course invites participants to gain and demonstrate knowledge of editing and copyediting techniques, broader editorial decisions, and online publishing platforms. We will explore editing within a rhetorical dimension, considering purpose and audience, as well as conventions of grammar, mechanics, and usage.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

 

 

Course ID: WR 303

Course Title: Writing for the Web

Section: 1

CRN: 54835

Instructor Name: Kelly

Day: MWF

Time: 1400-1450

Course Description: In Writing for the Web, students analyze the complex interactions between audiences, texts, and digital writing technologies. Students examine the shifts in purpose, genre, and rhetorical approach across digital platforms, learning to adapt their own message to suit a given medium. Throughout the term, we will interact with various networked communities and hone skills in creating rhetorically-savvy web documents on social media, Wikipedia and beyond.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

 

 

Course ID: WR 323

Course Title: English Composition

Section: 400

CRN: 52471

Instructor Name: Peters

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: Writing and the reading of writing are social processes that encourage the reader to interpret and respond to texts in varied, unique, and often complex ways. Students in WR 323 will be asked to read and respond to the work of others and compose their own texts with a heightened awareness of style, or the way in which language is used to clearly and gracefully articulate one’s own worldview. Students will be challenged to conceive of and develop their own style, focusing on elements of diction, tone, emphasis, shape and clarity.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

 

 

Course ID: WR 324

Course Title: Short Story Writing

Section: 400

CRN: 58061

Instructor Name: Harrison

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: In this intermediate online fiction writing workshop, students motivated to advance their creative writing skills will build upon a working knowledge of the elements of a fiction writer’s craft, including point of view, dialogue, imagery and setting, character development, voice, and dramatic structure developed in WR 224. Special attention will be paid to working in scenes – evoking emotion through dramatization, rather than through exposition. Students will study the narrative styles of a diverse selection of major contemporary authors to advance their own writing. Weekly exercises allow students to develop the beginning, middle, and end of stories, to work with imagery, and to listen for their own voice and style. In addition to these exercises, students complete weekly artistic and technical responses to anthology stories, write and revise two 4-page dialogue exercises and a final 10-12 page short story.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

 

 

Course ID: WR 324

Course Title: Short Story Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 50461

Instructor Name: Sandor

Day: TR

Time: 1600-1720

Course Description: In this intermediate level course you will be studying, through your own writing and the analysis of professional work, the craft of the literary short story. The main question: how do elements of the writer's craft--imagery, point of view, character and story structure--contribute to a story's power? Written work required: a series of short creative exercises leading up to a full-length story. Also required: daily written analyses of all peer and professional works, and active participation in class discussion. Please note: genre fiction, including science fiction, fantasy, romance, and childrens' literature, will not be considered in this class. Prerequisite: WR 224.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

 

 

Course ID: WR327

Course Title: TECHNICAL WRITING

See the Course Catalog for available sections.

Course Description:    WR 327 will prepare you to produce instructive, informational, and persuasive documents aimed at well-defined and achievable outcomes. Technical documents are precise, concise, and organized, but often based on complex information. However, the purpose and target audience of each document often determines how that information is presented, including writing style, document layout, vocabulary, sentence and paragraph structure, and visuals, among other factors. To this end, this course teaches processes for analyzing writing contexts and producing effective, clean, and reader-centered documents in an efficient manner. Grounded in rhetorical theory, WR 327 presents contemporary research in technical communication and instructs students in current best practices. Individually and in groups, students learn effective strategies for communicating with technology in the modern, networked workplace.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Writing II

 

 

Course ID: WR 327

Course Title: Technical Writing for Engineers

Section: 13

CRN: 52838

Instructor Name: Elbom, E.

Day: MWF

Time: 1600-1650

Course Description: In the “Technical Writing for Engineers” sections of WR 327, students use an engineering communication textbook and engage with the course objectives and learning outcomes through engineering-specific activities and assignments. This approach serves two purposes. First, by focusing specifically on principles of effective engineering communication, the course builds proficiency in the kinds of communication practices you will be tasked with both in pro-school and in the engineering workplace. Second, your engagement with fundamental engineering concepts in each of the course assignments will both solidify and extend your repertoire of technical knowledge. In other words, participation in this course not only will help you become a better engineering communicator but will also lead to greater conceptual and technical fluency in your chosen field.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

 

 

Course ID: WR 327

Course Title: Technical Writing for Engineers

Section: 4

CRN: 50465

Instructor Name: Elbom, E/Kelly

Day: MWF

Time: 1500-1550

Course Description: In the “Technical Writing for Engineers” sections of WR 327, students use an engineering communication textbook and engage with the course objectives and learning outcomes through engineering-specific activities and assignments. This approach serves two purposes. First, by focusing specifically on principles of effective engineering communication, the course builds proficiency in the kinds of communication practices you will be tasked with both in pro-school and in the engineering workplace. Second, your engagement with fundamental engineering concepts in each of the course assignments will both solidify and extend your repertoire of technical knowledge. In other words, participation in this course not only will help you become a better engineering communicator but will also lead to greater conceptual and technical fluency in your chosen field.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

 

 

Course ID: WR 327

Course Title: Technical Writing for Engineers

Section: 5

CRN: 55860

Instructor Name: Halton

Day: TR

Time: 1000-1120

Course Description: In the “Technical Writing for Engineers” sections of WR 327, students use an engineering communication textbook and engage with the course objectives and learning outcomes through engineering-specific activities and assignments. This approach serves two purposes. First, by focusing specifically on principles of effective engineering communication, the course builds proficiency in the kinds of communication practices you will be tasked with both in pro-school and in the engineering workplace. Second, your engagement with fundamental engineering concepts in each of the course assignments will both solidify and extend your repertoire of technical knowledge. In other words, participation in this course not only will help you become a better engineering communicator but will also lead to greater conceptual and technical fluency in your chosen field.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

 

 

Course ID: WR 327

Course Title: Technical Writing for Engineers

Section: 2

CRN: 50463

Instructor Name: Halton

Day: TR

Time: 1600-1720

Course Description: In the “Technical Writing for Engineers” sections of WR 327, students use an engineering communication textbook and engage with the course objectives and learning outcomes through engineering-specific activities and assignments. This approach serves two purposes. First, by focusing specifically on principles of effective engineering communication, the course builds proficiency in the kinds of communication practices you will be tasked with both in pro-school and in the engineering workplace. Second, your engagement with fundamental engineering concepts in each of the course assignments will both solidify and extend your repertoire of technical knowledge. In other words, participation in this course not only will help you become a better engineering communicator but will also lead to greater conceptual and technical fluency in your chosen field.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

 

 

Course ID: WR 341

Course Title: Poetry Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 52433

Instructor Name: Holmberg

Day: TR

Time: 1200-1320

Course Description: In this poetry course, 341 students will further refine the skills gained in WR 241: recognizing the poetic subject, using vivid and accurate language, creating appropriate metaphors and imagery, breaking lines effectively, and maximizing the musicality and rhythmic intensity of poetic lines. 441 students will continue work on these skills as well, while expanding the complexity, ambition, and literary sophistication of their poems; more demanding variations of the poem prompts will be provided, and other graded projects will be required. The theme of our class will be Variations on Voice and the Visual. Students will gain practice in writing poems in persona, and in the less-used third person point of view; we will also consider how diction affects voice, and how visual formatting helps project and communicate a poem’s voice or mood. Projects include a poem set least 100 years in the past or future, a poem that meditates on personal experience through a consideration of an artistic work located in the library or the Fairbanks Gallery, and a poem whose visual properties guide and inform the performance. During this course, students will read widely, using a variety of on line anthologies. A letterpress project will conclude the course, using our own letterpress studio in Moreland 130A.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

 

 

Course ID: WR 362

Course Title: Science Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 55336

Instructor Name: Conner

Day: MWF

Time: 1300-1350

Course Description: WR 362: Science Writing explores the practice and conventions for writing about science to a public audience of non-professionals. We will read and analyze some of the best and most influential science journalism from the past few years to see what makes that writing successful. The course addresses the practical skills involved in writing about complex scientific information and the models of science communication that those skills enable. Then we’ll write our own news pieces and feature articles focused that communicate that information to the public. Students will explore their specific areas of scientific interest and work to inspire that same interest in their audience, both in print and online. Reading and writing assignments have been designed to help students gain greater insight into the issues and challenges of science writing in a variety of contexts.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

 

 

Course ID: WR 407

Course Title: Screenwriting

Section: 400

CRN: TBD

Instructor Name: Turkel

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: This creative writing course focuses on three main topics: story structure, story outlining and the development of a properly formatted screenplay. This class will examine a range of professional materials including the outlines, screenplays, series documents and “story bibles” from a range of existing films and television shows. Students will then apply this understanding toward pitching, outlining, composing, workshopping, and revising the pilot episode of a series of their own creation.

 

 

Course ID: WR 414

Course Title: Advertising and Public Relations Writing

Section: 400

CRN: 56921

Instructor Name: St. Jacques

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: The Real Thing. Make America Great Again. Red Bull Gives You Wings. Each powerful slogan relates not merely to an advertising campaign or media blitz, but to a specific historical moment, a lifestyle, even a way of thinking. While advertising and public relations might seem like two vastly different worlds, they both share one deeply intrinsic task: mobilizing rhetorical skills to persuade target audiences to take a desired action. Professionals in advertising and public relations must be adept at writing in any media form that conveys their message to a selected target audience plausibly and expediently. This skill set demands proficiency at producing persuasive prose under tight deadline constraints. Through assembling and critiquing two multi-document portfolios – the advertising campaign and the press kit – WR414 participants hone skills at writing for advertising and public relations.

 

 

Course ID: WR 420

Course Title: Studies in Writing: Style & the Sentence

Section: 1

CRN: 54580

Instructor Name: Anderson

Day: MWF

Time: 0900-0950

Course Description: An exercise class, like circuit weights or yoga, with lots of style and grammar exercises, including sentence-diagramming, sentence-imitations, and a sequence of exercises designed to make your own sentences clearer, better, and more powerful. Fun, I hope. A reveling in sentences. Also, a quick look at the theory and pedagogy of style, from classical rhetoric to contemporary composition studies. Work: three class projects, the first on clarity, the second on diagramming, the third on “grace.”
Texts: Williams, Style: Lessons in Clarity and Grace Montoux, Drawing Sentences: A Guide to Diagramming.

 

 

Course ID: WR 424

Course Title: Advanced Fiction Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 50994

Instructor Name: Rodgers

Day: MWF

Time: 1100-1150

Course Description: Our focus this term will be to explore in deeper and more sophisticated ways both “macro” and “micro” levels of fiction writing. The macro level refers to narrative structure—how stories are put together, and how to choose or create the best possible form for our content. To that end, we’ll be writing several short pieces that play with different structures. At the micro level we’ll look at diction, syntax, paragraphs, openings, titles, transitions, metaphors, etc. As always we will examine the work of contemporary writers to use as our models and teachers. By the end of the term you will have studied and experimented with 3-4 narrative structures, further developed your critical writing and thinking skills, applied a range of strategies to your revision process, and widened your knowledge of contemporary authors’ work and the creative writing field generally. Fiction that falls strictly into genre categories such as sci fi, fantasy, and young adult will not be considered in this class. Prerequisites: WR 324 and WR 224.

 

 

Course ID: WR 435

Course Title: Scientific, Technical, & Professional Comm Capstone

Section: 1

CRN: TBD

Instructor Name: Pflugfelder

Day: M

Time: 0800-0850

Course Description: This one-credit course provides an opportunity for students enrolled in the certificate in scientific, technical, and professional communication to compose and design a portfolio of their existing work for future professional use. The course covers the purpose and goals in creating a portfolio, the selection and organization of materials, the formation of an editing and revision plan, the development of contextual summaries, the writing of an introductory letter, and the delivery of a finished portfolio project.

 

 

Course ID: WR 440

Course Title: Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing

Section: 1

CRN: TBD

Instructor Name: St. Germain

Day: TR

Time: 1200-1320

Course Description: This course will focus on reading, writing, and understanding the genre of creative nonfiction. Students will write full-length original creative essays of their own, and discuss them in a workshop setting. The class will also read and examine contemporary works of creative nonfiction from writers such as James Baldwin, Jo Ann Beard, and David Foster Wallace, as examples of the possibilities of the genre. Students will be expected to read up to 100 pages per week, to participate each day in discussion, and to write and revise extensively. Please consider this workload before enrolling in the course.

 

 

Course ID: WR 441

Course Title: Poetry Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 52635

Instructor Name: Holmberg

Day: TR

Time: 1200-1320

Course Description: In this poetry course, 341 students will further refine the skills gained in WR 241: recognizing the poetic subject, using vivid and accurate language, creating appropriate metaphors and imagery, breaking lines effectively, and maximizing the musicality and rhythmic intensity of poetic lines. 441 students will continue work on these skills as well, while expanding the complexity, ambition, and literary sophistication of their poems; more demanding variations of the poem prompts will be provided, and other graded projects will be required. The theme of our class will be Variations on Voice and the Visual. Students will gain practice in writing poems in persona, and in the less-used third person point of view; we will also consider how diction affects voice, and how visual formatting helps project and communicate a poem’s voice or mood. Projects include a poem set least 100 years in the past or future, a poem that meditates on personal experience through a consideration of an artistic work located in the library or the Fairbanks Gallery, and a poem whose visual properties guide and inform the performance. During this course, students will read widely, using a variety of on line anthologies. A letterpress project will conclude the course, using our own letterpress studio in Moreland 130A.
 

 

Course ID: WR 448

Course Title: Magazine Article Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 57991

Instructor Name: Griffin

Day: TR

Time: 1400-1520

Course Description: This course will guide you through the process of querying, writing, and selling your first magazine article. Reading deeply in the genre, both in print and online, you'll develop an understanding of the marketplace and learn strategies for building a freelance writing practice. This includes considerations of what makes for a good magazine article, discussions about recognizing and cultivating expertise, and exercises intended to hone your unique voice. You'll be introduced to valuable resources, will have the opportunity to chat with active editors, and will share your work with peers during in-class workshops. Expect a practical nuts and bolts class, one that leaves you a stronger and more confident writer.

 

 

Course ID: WR 449

Course Title: Critical Reviewing

Section: 400

CRN: 58026

Instructor Name: Strini

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: Students in this course will alternate in the roles of critic and editor at The Corvallis Review, an online magazine. The focus: observant, vivid writing about music, movies, TV, theater, dance, visual art and more. Secondary benefit: Knowledge of online publishing and building readership. https://corvallisreview.blogspot.com/