Schedule of Classes:

 

Course Descriptions:
Applied Journalism

 

Course Descriptions:
English
Course Descriptions:
Film
Course Descriptions:
Writing
2019-2020 Catalog
NEW!

AJ 300 Level

 

ENG 100 Level
ENG 200 Level
ENG 300 Level
ENG 400 Level

 


FILM 200 Level
WR 100 Level
WR 200 Level
WR 300 Level
WR 400 Level
         

Looking for graduate course descriptions? Find them here.

Download the PDF version of this term's course descriptions soon!

 

 

NEW! Apply this course to the Applied Journalism minor!

 

Course ID: AJ 311

Course Title: Media Storytelling

Section: 1

CRN: 18302

Instructor Name: St. Jacques

Day: MWF

Time: 1400-1450

Course Description: Journalists in AJ311 craft narratives for publication across an array of media, with an eye to producing meticulously crafted multimedia stories for publication in digital venues. In addition to conducting interviews, gathering facts, checking for accuracy, writing compelling body copy and assembling accurate articles by deadline, students will concentrate on editing with a strong hand to prepare for publication in high-circulation markets. As the course title implies, the central skill set in AJ 311 revolves around composing visually dynamic news packages your readers can’t put down until they’re finished. Within numerous peer-to-peer workshops and meetings with professionals in the Orange Media Network and beyond, students will produce tight multimedia packages in short and long feature formats.

 

Course ID: AJ 490

Course Title: Media Law and Ethics

Section: 1

CRN: 20042

Instructor Name: St Jacques

Day: MWF

Time: 1200-1250

Course Description: When journalists break the law or compromise their ethics, it does not merely result in high costs to employers (as in multi-million-dollar lawsuits)—it also takes an incalculable toll on our general profession in terms of credibility and prestige. Because mass media shapes society’s perception of people and events, unethical conduct ultimately solidifies how individuals behave and interact acrosscultures. AJ490 participants begin this course by articulating the critical difference between media law and media ethics, then evaluating (and writing about) specific case studies that engage and support ethical and legal precedent. As this concerns media law, students will review trendsetting legal casework to identify and verbalize the current legal disposition towards defamation, libel, plagiarism, copyright, fair use, public domain and privacy. Concerning media ethics, students identify and explain pivotal concepts such as fairness, conflict of interest, cultural sensitivity, balance, diversity issues, gratuitousness, stereotyping, objectivity and the protection of the rights of minors. In addition to a series of Canvas quizzes and exams, participants develop their own Moral Compass journal and produce a final paper based on the media reception of current events and their participation in a series of panel discussions on topical interests.

Hybrid Course: AJ 490 is a hybrid course. The instructor anticipates at least 30 percent of the class will take place in a face-to-face classroom scenario, and the other 70 percent will take place virtually on Canvas, your online learning platform. The materials you’ll find on Canvas will consist of online lectures and open source learning materials (videos, podcasts, essays, articles, etc.), as well as online quizzes, assignments, discussion boards and things of that nature. In addition, students will view one required film per week that has a direct bearing on the course materials—these films can be rented on either Amazon or Netflix, and any cost incurred will replace the cost of the textbook I eliminated in favor of open-source materials.

 

  

Course ID: ENG 104

Course Title: Intro to Literature: Fiction

Section: 1

CRN: 10208

Instructor Name: Betjemann

Day: MWF

Time: 1400-1450

Course Description: Works of fiction are like any other dataset: they are collections of words, plots, and characters overflowing with a thousand possible interpretations and innumerable implications. What fiction might mean, coherently, only becomes clear when we read individual works with care, sorting out patterns, testing hypotheses, and thinking experimentally. This courses uses wonderful works of short fiction – from Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Tell-Tale Heart” to Ralph Ellison’s “Flying Home” – to introduce these adventurous, intellectually engaged, and downright fun strategies of reading. We will cover works from the 1700s to the present, and will close by putting our skills to the test on the best-selling book of our own era, J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

 

 

Course ID: ENG 104

Course Title: Intro to Literature: Fiction

Section: 2

CRN: 10209

Instructor Name: Bushnell

Day: TR

Time: 830-950

Course Description: Understanding a story is one thing, but experiencing its impact is another. In this course, you’ll discover the simple routes into the heart of a story and witness how they’re enriched by more subtle literary elements. The goal will be not just to understand how fiction operates but to access its full range of emotional and intellectual rewards. You’ll read terrific stories from some of the best writers of the last century and a half, such as Anton Chekhov, James Baldwin, and Alice Munro. You will also be asked to think critically about the ideas and issues you encounter, such as gender, class, race, power, trauma, free will, the open marketplace, and what it really means to be a vampire. By the end of the term, you will have received exposure to a broad variety of narratives, cultures, and ideas, and you will have developed the skills to appreciate their meaning, value, and pleasure.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

 

 

Course ID: ENG 104

Course Title: Intro to Literature: Fiction

Section: 400

CRN: 13503

Instructor Name: Harrison

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: This online introductory course will examine literary fiction in the novel and short story form from the perspective of a fiction writer. Students will develop a critical vocabulary with which to analyze how successfully the assigned authors have fulfilled the expectations of literary fiction. Craft discussions will focus on literary elements that include characterization, significant detail, dialogue, voice, point of view, and setting, as well as figurative language concepts suchas symbolism, metaphor and theme. Required reading will include two contemporary novels and two collections of contemporary short stories. The voices are wide ranging and represent a good sample of contemporary literature. Course work will include a mid-term and final exam, three quizzes and weekly reading checks.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

 

 

Course ID: ENG 106

Course Title: Intro to Literature: Poetry

Section: 2

CRN: 13363

Instructor Name: Biespiel

Day: MWF

Time: 1500-1550

Course Description: THE POETRY OF SEX, DRUGS, AND REBELLION: In many nations in the world a poem can land a writer in jail. That’s because poems can change the world, one reader at a time. What makes a poem subversive? What causes a poet to write about aspects of life that include hallucination, the erotic, or dissent? In this course we’ll pursue appreciation for the basic human experiences that writers dramatize through metaphor — and allow ourselves the space to enjoy thinking imaginatively, critically, and creatively for its own sake. ENG 106 is less about solving the meaning of poems and more about exploring the questions of life that poems enter (and looking at how poems do that). With focus on the experiences of poems, poets, and readers, with focus on the public and private lives that poems explore, with focus on the pleasures of the arrangement of language and metaphor, and with focus on the cultural, social, political, and spiritual subjects that poems explore, students in ENG 106 study the life of poetry and the poetry of life.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

 

 

Course ID: ENG 106

Course Title: Intro to Literature: Poetry

Section: 400

CRN: 13987

Instructor Name: Elbom, G

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: Through a close reading of traditional and innovative poetry, we will introduce and explore a variety of poetic devices and forms. We will examine our poems from different perspectives, placing them in larger contexts: historical, cultural, political, philosophical, theological, structural, feminist, psychological, postcolonial, and so on.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

 

 

Course ID: ENG 200

Course Title: Library Skills for Literary Study

Section: 2

CRN: 12388

Instructor Name: McElroy

Day: W

Time: 1000-1050

Course Description: In this course, we will look at the topic of “library skills” broadly. We will spend time learning how to find and use resources from the OSU Libraries’ collections and will think about issues related to information. We will look at how information is organized – knowledge you can use to unlock any collection of information, in a library, on the web, or in an archive.

**Hybrid**

 

 

Course ID: ENG 201

Course Title: *Shakespeare

Section: 2

CRN: 16970

Instructor Name: Olson

Day: MWF

Time: 900-950

Course Description: An introduction to the first half of Shakespeare’s dramatic career (the Elizabethan period), with attention to the playwright’s continued global influence. This course is designed to help students become confident readers of Shakespeare’s language, articulate the significance of aural and visual elements of Shakespearean scripts, and analyze the plays in light of specific cultural and historical contexts, both early modern and contemporary. Plays include Richard III, Romeo and Juliet, The Merchant of Venice, and Hamlet.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts, Western Culture

**Pre-1800 Course**

 

 

Course ID: ENG 204

Course Title: Survey of British Lit: Beginning to 1660

Section: 1

CRN: 10216

Instructor Name: Bude

Day: TR

Time: 1000-1120

Course Description: This course is an introduction to English literature from its beginnings through Chaucer and Shakespeare, and to the early poems of Milton. From Anglo-Saxon riddles and charms to bawdy fabliaux, from travel narratives to sonnets and the rise of professional theater, this course will survey nearly a thousand years of English literary forms in their political, cultural, and artistic contexts, with an eye to understanding how premodern literature and language shaped the course of history. In 800 CE, “England” was merely a loose conglomeration of small kingdoms, a backwater in the North Atlantic fighting to survive against Viking invaders. By 1660, the English Empire was a growing colonial power internally fragmented by political and religious dissent. What was literature in this early period of English history, and how did its definition, power, and use change over time? What did it mean to read? What relationship did early English literature have to music, the visual arts, and scientific thought? How did English literature create the idea of an English nation?

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts, Western Culture

** Pre-1800 Course**

 

 

Course ID: ENG 210

Course Title: Intro to Literature of the World: Asia

Section: 400

CRN: 19968

Instructor Name: Fearnside

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: Utilizing multiple perspectives—cultural, geographical, historical, linguistic, political, religious, structural, stylistic, thematic, and other points of view—students read, discuss, analyze, and write about representative works of fiction, both short and long forms, from Asia, with a special emphasis on the literatures of countries along the historic Silk Road. Texts will be examined in a comparative context and analyses expanded with the help of secondary sources. Involves reading modern and contemporary authors, formal writing assignments involving research, lectures, moderated discussions, and online activities.

 

 

Course ID: ENG 213

Course Title: Literature of the World: Middle East

Section: 1

CRN: 16971

Instructor Name: Elbom, G.

Day: TR

Time: 1400-1520

Course Description: This class will focus on modern Middle Eastern literature from multiple perspectives: cultural, political, religious, historical, geographical, linguistic, structural, stylistic, thematic, comparative, and other points of view. The texts on our reading list include a feminist Egyptian novel, surrealist Hebrew fiction from Israel, and a postmodern Palestinian novel. Among the topics we will discuss are different languages and dialects of the Middle East, different national and cultural categories, and the idea that the distinctions between these categories are often fluid and dynamic. We will also try to establish connections between Middle Eastern narratives and global cultural and intellectual ideas.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts, Diversity

 

 

Course ID: ENG 215

Course Title: *Classical Mythology

Section: 1

CRN: 19401

Instructor Name: Olson

Day: MWF

Time: 1100-1150

Course Description: Athena. Orpheus. Zeus. Medusa. Greek and Roman myths continue to inform Western culture, from the logo on our tennis shoes to the adventures of Percy Jackson. This course provides a comprehensive overview of the world of the Olympian gods: we will read excerpts from Classical literature and also consider how the myths are represented—and reworked—in a variety of modes (statues, film, dance, novels, internet memes) up to the present day. Why do we turn to these powerful archetypes to better describe and understand the human experience? And when, and in what ways, do they fail us in this respect?

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts, Western Culture

**Pre-1800 Course**

 

 

Course ID: ENG 220

Course Title: Topics: Difference, Power, Discrimination: Sexuality in Film

Section: 1

CRN: 19402

Instructor Name: St Jacques

Day: MWF

Time: 900-950

Course Description: Above all else, ENG/FILM 220 requires participants to verbally and interactively articulate their own viewpoints regarding the social construction and distribution of difference, power and discrimination in contemporary cinema, particularly as filmmakers engage cinematic tropes to depict sexualities for multifarious political and libidinal ends. To those ends, ENG/FILM220 participants will evaluate the intersection of sex, class, race and age. Beginning with films that centralize tropes of heterosexual normalcy, students progress to viewing and evaluating queer and subversive films that question sexual norms, phallocentric systems of repression and compulsory heterosexuality. This course will therefore present students with diverse and sometimes oppositional critical theories, including but not limited to psychoanalytic, feminist, (post)feminist, post- structural and queer theories. This theoretical and corporeal foundation will prove an ample springboard for research, writing, group discussion and personal reflection as we strive to achieve our DPD aims.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Diff/Power/Disc

 

 

Course ID: ENG 253

Course Title: *Survey of American Literature: Colonization-1900

Section: 2

CRN: 17799

Instructor Name: Sheehan

Day: TR

Time: 1200-1320

Course Description: This class examines literature written before 1900 that responds to and shapes life in and near what is now the United States of America. We will study accounts of colonial contact, conquest, and resistance; slave narratives and early American ideas about the self; poems about religious devotion, the natural world, and freedom; and tales that describe and imagine the cultural, economic, and political forces that shape American individuals, communities, and places.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts, Western Culture

 

 

Course ID: ENG 275H 

Course Title: *The Bible as Literature

Section: 1

CRN: 19639

Instructor Name: Anderson

Day: MWF

Time: 1000-1050

Course Description: In this class we’ll try to set aside everything else and look closely at the language and style of the four canonical gospels, Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, as if we are reading any other story, the work of any other creative writer: the narrative arcs, the development of character, what the stories say and what they don’t. I’ll ask you to do a short warm-up essay, a take-home essay midterm, and a take-home essay final. There’ll also be pop quizzes along the way, as well as frequent in-class freewriting. Our emphasis will be on ways of reading--on kinds of truth and methods of interpretation.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts, Western Culture

**Honors**

 

 

Course ID: ENG 311

Course Title: Studies in British Prose

Section: 1

CRN: 19406

Instructor Name: Gottlieb

Day: MWF

Time: 1000-1050

Course Description: Today’s popular media and literary fiction are both obsessed with the end of the world as we know it, whether from climate change, genetic engineering, or something else altogether. But although dystopian fiction is more popular now than ever, it was preceded by utopian fiction that believed in humanity’s ability to make a better world. By pairing classic and contemporary works of utopian and dystopian fiction, this course will identify and analyze their shared conventions, including travel (through time as well as space), technology (to protect as well as to control), and identity (communal as well as individual). Nevertheless, we will also pay close attention to the ways our collective imagination has veered sharply toward the dystopian.

Special Topic: Utopia/Dystopia

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: WIC

 

 

Course ID: ENG 318

Course Title: The American Novel: Modernist

Section: 400

CRN: 19963

Instructor Name: Elbom, G.

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: Focusing on some of the prominent thematic, stylistic, historical, and cultural aspects of American modernism, this class will combine famous classics with important novels other than the ones commonly perceived as canonical. Through close textual analysis and active participation in ongoing discussions, we will examine seminal works of American modernism that have paved the way for previously silenced voices, paying attention to the rise of nontraditional authors, characters, literary strategies, and subject matters.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts, West Culture

 

 

Course ID: ENG 345

Course Title: Introduction to Literary Criticism & Theory

Section: 1

CRN: 19407

Instructor Name: Sheehan

Day: TR

Time: 1600-1720

This course introduces students to the most influential movements and methods shaping literary study in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, including Marxism, psychoanalysis, structuralism, post-structuralism, feminism, queer studies, cultural studies, postcolonial studies, critical race studies and ethnic studies. During the term, students will grapple with transformative ideas about language, form, subjectivity, bodies, knowledge, power, politics, economics, history, gender, sexuality, and race. Students will also practice using various concepts, methods, and theories as they analyze and interpret literary texts verbally and in writing.

 

 

Course ID: ENG 362

Course Title: *American Women Writers

Section: 1

CRN: 17788

Instructor Name: Helle

Day: TR

Time: 1000-1120

Course Description: This course studies important literary works in a variety of genres by American women writers from historical, thematic, and formal perspectives. The fall 2019 section focuses on changing representations of American womanhood in literary texts from the 1890s to the present. Works by Kate Chopin, Anzia Yezierska, Nella Larsen, Toni Morrison, Anne Sexton and others are considered. This course differs from many courses in literary studies because we will be focusing explicitly on authors whose plots and characters raise questions about gender performance in art and literature and its implications for shaping historical and social change. By the end of the term, you should be able to drawn points of comparison across different historical periods and literary movements around a given theme. Among such themes: gender and creativity, space and place (including nature and nationhood), embodiment, family and community.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

 

 

Course ID: ENG 375

Course Title: Children's Literature

Section: 400

CRN: 16942

Instructor Name: Braun

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: This course surveys a variety of genres, which may include fairy tales, folktales, fables, nonsense poetry, picture books, historical and fantasy novels, examining how these texts represent childhood and connect with historical, cultural, and psychological contexts. What counts as children’s literature? Is its purpose to entertain, to socialize, to indoctrinate, or something else? In this class, we will tackle these questions (and more) as we examine the developmentof children’s literature over time, beginning with the first “golden age” of the nineteenth century and ending with our current “golden age” in the twenty-first century. Wewill think about how conceptions of childhood have changed over time, shaped by and shaping the literature produced for children. Additionally, we will look at children’s literature from the perspective of craft, investigating how literary devices and styles are used by children’s authors to influence the child reader in a myriad of ways.

 

 

Course ID: ENG 399

Course Title: Special Topics: Career Prep for English Majors

Section: 1

CRN: 17789

Instructor Name: Delf

Day: MW

Time: 1300-1350

Course Description: “English major, huh? What are you going to do with that?” Anything you want! English majors become lawyers, software testers, publishers, social media managers, non-profit outreach specialists, and even (as everyone assumes) teachers. The same skills that you’ve used to analyze Bleak House and write about Baldwin can help you in the real world, too. As Frank B. Liebold argues in his 2010 article “Where Have All the Jobs Gone?,” the current job market requires critical thinking and problem solving skills as much as anything else, and these “transferable skill-sets, or competencies, have become the new currency for success and future employability.”

This class is designed for English majors interested in exploring and preparing for post-graduation career options. You’ll consider your own personal strengths and interests, reflect on the English degree and what you’ve gained, and get real experience and feedback on your resume, cover letter, and—yes, you need one— LinkedIn profile.

 

 

Course ID: ENG 480

Course Title: Special Topics: Literature, Culture, and Society: Literature and Science

Section: 1

CRN: 19408

Instructor Name: Malewitz

Day: MWF

Time: 1100-1150

Course Description: This course is designed to introduce students to the diverse means by which modern science has entered into dialogue with modern and contemporary literature and literary theory. The working thesis of the course is that the various challenges presented by modern physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, and communication theory are not only reflected in but also transformed by modern cultural artifacts and literary theories. Students will explore the significance of such interdisciplinary translations through a variety of generic perspectives including drama, essay, fiction, and autobiography. We will examine how artists employ scientific theory to organize or preserve unfathomable historical events, how they adapt the technologies of science towards the production of new artistic structures, how they portray scientists at work at their craft, and how they show us how science redefines notions of gender, family, and other humanist constructs.

Special Topics: Literature and Science

 

 

Course ID: ENG 490

Course Title: History of the English Language

Section: 1

CRN: 19410

Instructor Name: Bude

Day: TR

Time: 1400-1520

Course Description: Between January 2018 and March 2019, 650 new entries were added to the Oxford English Dictionary’s catalog of nearly 230,000 English words. Among them were “puggle,” “Latin@,” and “peoplekind” – proof that English is constantly changing to address the concerns and interests of the present. In this class, we will study the history of the English language over the last 1500 years, examining its syntax, grammar, and vocabulary in its social, political, and artistic context. How do war, trade, globalization, memes, and tourism affect language? How is it that we consider the creole of Papua New Guinea (Mi lukim dok), Old English (Ic seo thone hund), Middle English (Y se the dogge), and Modern Standard English (I see the dog) as belonging to the same language despite their broad differences? Although we will focus on the whole history of English, this class will pay particularly close attention to Old English, Middle English, and contemporary Englishes from around the world.

**Pre-1800 Course**

 

 

Course ID: FILM 220

Course Title: *Topics: Difference, Power, Discrimination: Sexuality in Film 

Section: 1

CRN: 19404

Instructor Name: St Jacques

Day: MWF

Time: 0900-0950

Course Description: Above all else, ENG/FILM 220 requires participants to verbally and interactively articulate their own viewpoints regarding the social construction and distribution of difference, power and discrimination in contemporary cinema, particularly as filmmakers engage cinematic tropes to depict sexualities for multifarious political and libidinal ends. To those ends, ENG/FILM220 participants will evaluate the intersection of sex, class, race and age. Beginning with films that centralize tropes of heterosexual normalcy, students progress to viewing and evaluating queer and subversive films that question sexual norms, phallocentric systems of repression and compulsory heterosexuality. This course will therefore present students with diverse and sometimes oppositional critical theories, including but not limited to psychoanalytic, feminist, (post)feminist, post- structural and queer theories. This theoretical and corporeal foundation will prove an ample springboard for research, writing, group discussion and personal reflection as we strive to achieve our DPD aims.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Diff/Power/Disc

 

Course ID: FILM 245

Course Title: New American Cinema

Section: 400

CRN: 14566

Instructor Name: Rust

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: This class will attend post-rating system Hollywood (1968-present) by closely examining the important films and filmmakers of the period along with key events in the business of developing, producing, distributing, and exhibiting motion pictures. There are no prerequisites for this course. This is an ambitious academic course, not a film appreciation class. This course will be delivered via Canvas where you will interact with your classmates and with your instructor. Within the course Canvas site you will access the learning materials, such as the syllabus, class discussions, assignments, projects, and quizzes. To preview how an online course works, visit the Ecampus Course Demo.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

 

 

Course ID: FILM 265

Course Title: *Films for the Future

Section: 1

CRN: 19415

Instructor Name: Lewis

Day: W lectures; R screenings

Time: 1600-1950; 1800-2150

Course Description: If thinking about the future makes you nervous, FILM 265: Films for the Future offers plenty of food for thought. The class surveys science fiction films from turn of the 20th century futurist shorts like Trip to the Moon and silent era classics like Metropolis through contemporary dystopian fantasies like Gattaca and Ex-Machina. Included as well: A Clockwork Orange, Blade Runner, Alien and Aliens, and The Handmaid’s Tale.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Pers, Lit and Arts

 

 

Course ID: WR 121

Course Title: *English Composition

See the Course Catalog for available sections.

Course Description: WR 121 is designed to help students develop skills and confidence in analytical writing. It also emphasizes rhetorical awareness—the perception of where, how, and why persuasion is occurring. This section offers the unique opportunity for collaboration with the Valley Library’s Special Collections and Archives Research Center. Students will engage directly with materials from the University’s collections in the process of writing a high-quality, researched academic essay. Assignments and in-class activities will emphasize and explore the process of writing, including acts of reading, researching, analytical thinking, freewriting, drafting, review, revision, and editing.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR I

 

 

Course ID: WR 130

Course Title: Fundamentals of Grammar

Section: 400

CRN: 18227

Instructor Name: Jensen

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: This course offers you an adaptive series of lessons designed to increase your proficiency in grammar, syntax, and sentence-level writing. A diagnostic survey at the beginning will identify your priorities and tailor content to suit your unique needs and goals.

 

 

Course ID: WR 201

Course Title: *Writing for Media

Section: 400

CRN: 17234

Instructor Name: St Jacques

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: WR201 Writing for Media introduces students to reporting news across traditional and new media forms. Students compose stories in newspaper, radio, broadcast, blog, digital reporting and multimedia styles. The course requires students to conduct interviews, compile research, and turn in publishable articles by deadline. The final assignment in this course (the multimedia package), is a team assignment and will require scheduling time outside of class for its completion.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

 

 

Course ID: WR 214

Course Title: *Writing in Business

See the Course Catalog for available sections.

Course Description: Thoughtful and thorough communication across multiple audiences and for multiple purposes continues to be an extremely important skill set in business. Writing in Business helps you build these skills and makes use of different networked technologies, software, and online materials in order to broaden your understanding of where, why, and how writing in the workplace happens. You’ll learn the principles and practices necessary for writing ethical and effective business letters, memos, and reports for a range of professional contexts. WR 214 will also help you present yourself as a professional, research  job opportunities, write materials for job applications, and then land the position you want. The work you’ll do in this course is informed by current research in rhetoric and professional writing and is guided by the needs and practices of business, industry, and society at large.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

 

 

Course ID: WR 222

Course Title: *English Composition

See the Course Catalog for available sections.

Course Description: Argument may seem like a simple word; it’s anything but. One look at the title of your textbook supports that claim. Arguments live in everything we see, think and do. They can be as overt as a Presidential debate and as subtle as a paint color. When you start seeing argumentation in this way, the possibilities are endless. As varied as arguments come, there are tried and true constants in the analysis and crafting of their myriad messages. Arguments are conversations. There is more than one voice in the room. They are grounded in the art of persuasion. They succeed and fail on an understanding of audience. In this course, you will learn the basics of what goes into good argumentative writing through extensive reading, analyzing, brain storming, peer reviewing, revising, debating and (of course) writing. You will develop strategies to help you interpret a variety of texts and compose in a variety of media. This course will show you how a sound argument moves, considering structure, support and form. You will improve your ability to revise your ideas, the reasoning that supports those ideas, and the writing that illustrates them.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

 

 

Course ID: WR 222 PSYCH

Course Title: *English Composition

Section: 3, 12

CRN: 10137, 13373

Instructor Name: Drummond

Day: MWF

Time: 1200-1250

These specialized sections of WR 222 will continue practice in expository writing with an emphasis on argumentation and research specifically for Psychology Majors. (Bacc Core Course) PREREQS: WR 121 [C-] or WR 121H [C-] or Placement Test WWRI(1)

Course Description: Arguments live in everything we see, think, and do. They can be as overt as an intense debate and as subtle as a paint color. As varied as arguments come, there are tried and true constants in the analysis and crafting of their myriad messages. Arguments are grounded in the art of persuasion, and they succeed and fail on an understanding of audience. In this course, you will learn the basics of what goes into good argumentative writing through extensive reading, analyzing, and writing. In addition, this section of WR 222 is specific to Psychology majors; students will gain additional preparation for making arguments in the Psychology major, including writing approaches, research and reading techniques, and APA style.

Special Topics:Psychology

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

 

 

Course ID: WR 224

Course Title: *Intro to Fiction Writing

See the Course Catalog for available sections.

Course Description: WR 224 is an introduction to the writing of fiction. Our approach in this online fiction writing workshop will be to develop your skills as a creative writer through several means: careful reading and analysis of our own work; careful reading and analysis of established writers’ work; the execution of several meaningful fiction exercises; and a constant commitment to revision. Assessment methods include creative writing exercises, quizzes and reading checks on textbook craftsections, peer review, and the evolution of a short story from first to final, polished draft by the end of the term. Successful completion of Writing 121 is a prerequisite for this course.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

 

 

Course ID: WR 230

Course Title: The Essentials of English Grammar

Section: 400

CRN: 19964

Instructor Name: Bushnell

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: Consider the following: The tume snoggled a gumulent dern. The words aren’t real, but you can recognize the purpose of each from its place in the sentence, right? You know grammar. It’s there in your head, helping you form coherent speech every day of your life. But how do you know it? How does it work? How do you translate it into your writing and avoid common pitfalls? Where, for example, do the commas really go? When should you use whom, and to whom does it matter? And is it really so wrong to start a sentence with and? This course will answer these questions and many others, introducing you to the structures of sentences with a focus on beginning grammar, so that your own writing choices can be more conscientious and effective—whether you stick to the rules or not.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

   

 

Course ID: WR 240

Course Title: *Intro to Nonfiction Writing

See the Course Catalog for available sections.

Course Description: Creative nonfiction is the genre of creative writing that bridges the act of making literary prose--the crafting of vivid scenes, a thoughtful narrative voice, and meaningful formats--with the kinds of practical personal writing often required in our academic and professional lives. In this course, we will discuss several published pieces from the creative nonfiction genre, including personal essays, memoir, and lyric essay. More importantly, we will also write, edit, workshop, and revise several pieces of our own creative nonfiction. Expect a lively class with lots of imaginative prompts, free-writes, and hardy discussion.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Writing II

 

 

Course ID: WR 241

Course Title: *Intro to Poetry Writing

See the Course Catalog for available sections.

Course Description: This course is designed to help you sharpen your sensitivity to language and become a skilled reader and writer of poetry. We will study the basic elements of poetry”including imagery, voice, lineation, and meter”to further develop our understanding of poetic techniques.We will work on in-class writing exercises to help coax your initial ideasinto

finished poems. In the workshop, we will discuss your own poems in depth. Our goal in workshopping one another’s poems will be to sharpen our own critical faculties while providing thoughtful, useful feedback. We will also read and study a variety of published poems to understand both the nature of contemporary poetry and the literary tradition of which we, as poets, are a part.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Writing II

 

 

Course ID: WR 303

Course Title: *Writing for the Web

Section: 400

CRN: 17818

Instructor Name: Kelly

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: In Writing for the Web, students analyze the complex interactions between audiences, texts, and digital writing technologies. Students examine the shifts in purpose, genre, and rhetorical approach across digital platforms, learning to adapt their own message to suit a given medium. Throughout the term, we will interact with various networked communities and hone skills in creating rhetorically-savvy web documents on social media, Wikipedia and beyond.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

   

 

Course ID: WR 323

Course Title: English Composition

Section: 400

CRN: 13255

Instructor Name: Peters

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: Writing and the reading of writing are social processes that encourage the reader to interpret and respond to texts in varied, unique, and often complex ways. Students in WR 323 will be asked to read and respond to the work of others and compose their own texts with a heightened awareness of style, or the way in which language is used to clearly and gracefully articulate one’s own worldview. Students will be challenged to conceive of and develop their own style, focusing on elements of diction, tone, emphasis, shape and clarity.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

 

 

Course ID: WR 324

Course Title: *Short Story Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 17301

Instructor Name: Dybek

Day: MWF

Time: 1300-1350

Course Description: Tim O’Brien writes that a story, if truly told, makes the “stomach believe.” But how do you convince a reader to believe, or even care about, something that never happened? In this class, we will attempt to answer this question—and many others—by reading and critiquing works of fiction (by published writers and by you and your classmates), and by completing short exercises that aim to illuminate the craft by calling attention to choices and effects of imagery, perspective, character, etc. This course will follow the workshop model of peer critique, so be prepared to write and read quite a bit and have at least two pieces of original fiction, one of which will be workshopped in class. Many would argue that writing cannot be taught. But, as with any craft—origami, ship carpentry—there is a long tradition of studying fiction in order to learn specific and/or established techniques and writing strategies. On the other hand, some of the most exciting fiction occurs when a writer disregards or flouts expected craft choices. In this course we’ll endeavor to figure out what “the rules” are and how and when to break them.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

 

 

Course ID: WR 324

Course Title: *Short Story Writing

Section: 2

CRN: 19421

Instructor Name: Rodgers

Day: T

Time: 1200-1320

Course Description: WR 224 is the prerequisite to this course (no exceptions). This section of WR 324 is a Hybrid course: class will meet once a week in person, with the remaining components occurring online. In 324 you’ll further develop your understanding of the elements of narrative (plot, point of view,characterization, setting, tone, metaphor, subtext, etc.) both as writer and reader; engage in a range of writing exercises and prompts to help you develop voice and material; become a more sophisticated reader of your peers’ stories, and the stories of contemporary authors; and hone your critical skills, written and oral. Course requirements may include three graded exercises, one short story, regular quizzes, a craft essay/analysis, and participation, including online discussions andcollaborations.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

**Hybrid**

 

   

Course ID: WR 327

Course Title: *Technical Writing

See the Course Catalog for available sections.

Course Description: Technical Writing (WR 327) will prepare you to produce instructive, informative, and persuasive documents aimed at well-defined and achievable outcomes. Technical documents are precise,concise, logically organized, and factually based. The purpose and target audience of each document determine the style that an author chooses, which includes document layout, vocabulary, sentence and paragraph structure, and visuals. Hence, this course will teach processes for analyzing writing contexts and producing effective, clean, and reader-centered documents efficiently. You can expect to gather, read, and present the technical content of your field to various audiences in attractive, error-free copy, as well as to learn strategies for presenting that content orally.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

 

 

Course ID: WR 327 ENGR

Course Title: *Technical Writing

See the Course Catalog for available sections.

Course Description: In the “Technical Writing for Engineers” sections of WR 327, students use an engineering communication textbook and engage with the course objectives and learning outcomes through engineering-specific activities and assignments. This approach serves two purposes. First, by focusing specifically on principles of effective engineering communication, the course builds proficiency in the kinds of communication practices you will be tasked with both in pro-school and in the engineering workplace. Second, your engagement with fundamental engineering concepts in each of the course assignments will both solidify and extend your repertoire of technical knowledge. In other words, participation in this course not only will help you become a better engineering communicator but will also lead to greater conceptual and technical fluency in your chosen field.

Special Topic: Engineering

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

 

 

Course ID: WR 340

Course Title: Creative Nonfiction Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 16974

Instructor Name: St Germain

Day: MWF

Time: 1000-1050

Course Description: This course will focus on reading, writing, and understanding the dynamic and fast-growing genre of creative nonfiction. Students will gain experience writing and revising their own work, as well as participating in discussion and workshops of their peers’ writing, and reading examples of CNF from contemporary and classic writers such as James Baldwin, Zadie Smith, and Claudia Rankine. You will be expected to read up to 100 pages per week, to participate each day in discussion, and to write assignments or exercises every week. Please consider this workload before enrolling in the course.

 

 

Course ID: WR 362

Course Title: *Science Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 18413

Instructor Name: Griffin

Day: TR

Time: 1000-1120

Course Description: TBD

Special Topics: Anthropocene Now! -- Climate Change and (Post-) Apocalyptic Discourse in Theory, Literature, Art, and Activism

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: Core, Skills, WR II

  

 

Course ID: WR 407

Course Title: Screenwriting

Section: 400

CRN: 19969

Instructor Name: Turkel

Day: Ecampus

Course Description: This creative writing course focuses on three main topics: story structure, story outlining and the development of a properly formatted screenplay. This class will examinearangeofprofessionalmaterialsincludingtheoutlines, screenplays, series documents and “story bibles” from a range of existing films and television shows. Students will then apply this understanding toward pitching, outlining, composing, workshopping, and revising the pilot episode of a series of their own creation.

 

 

Course ID: WR 411

Course Title: ^The Teaching of Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 17796

Instructor Name: Pflugfelder

Day: MWF

Time: 900-950

Course Description: In WR 411/511, The Teaching of Writing, we’ll study research about the teaching of writing and practice what it means to assign, evaluate, and respond to student writers. This course is designed to introduce current and future teachers of writing to theory and pedagogy in composition studies, to help us become aware of and strengthen our own writing processes, and to enable us to make and express connections between classroom experience and composition theory. We’ll be looking at assessment, response, assignment creation, grammar, literacy, multimedia, process, and genre as we explore composition and writing. Coming out of this class, you’ll be better prepared to teach and evaluate your students’ writing and likely feel more confident in your own writing.

Bacc Core Requirement(s) Fulfilled: WIC

 

 

Course ID: WR 424

Course Title: Advanced Fiction Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 19422

Instructor Name: Dybek

Day: MWF

Time: 1100-1150

Course Description: This term we’ll continue to build on the skills studied in WR 224 and WR 324 by reading and discussing both published and student stories with an eye towards how the pieces are constructed and crafted. Our particular focus, though, will be on reading and crafting our own “linked” short stories— that is, a collection or group of stories that can be read and understood alone and on their own terms but also work together to form a longer and cohesive narratives via such confluences as character, setting and voice. By the end of the term expect to read three linked collections of published work and to have produced your own mini collection of at least three “linked” stories.

 

 

Course ID: WR 435

Course Title: Science/Tech/Pro Communication Capstone

Section: 1

CRN: 19423

Instructor Name: Pflugfelder

Day: M

Time: 800-850

Course Description: This one-credit course provides an opportunity for students enrolled in the certificate in scientific, technical, and professional communication to compose and design a portfolio of their existing work for future professional use. The course covers the purpose and goals in creating a portfolio, the selection and organization of materials, the formation of an editing and revision plan, the development of contextual summaries, the writing of an introductory letter, and the delivery of a finished portfolio project. Faculty will assist students in these decisions throughout the five-week course, each week focusing on smaller elements of the portfolio project. The portfolio will be proof of the work students have completed in their certificate program and assist students in representing those abilities to others.

 

 

Course ID: WR 448

Course Title: Magazine Article Writing

Section: 1

CRN: 17232

Instructor Name: St Germain

Day: TR

Time: 1200-1320

Course Description: This course will focus on reading, writing, and understanding the genre of magazine writing. Classmembers will read selections from The Best American Magazine Writing, and will use them as examples of craft while writing their own article. We will also discuss student works-in-progress in a workshop setting, and the process of pitching an article for publication. Students will be expected to read up to 100 pages per week, to participate each day in discussion, and to write weekly exercises and assignments. Please consider this workload before enrolling in the course.

 

 

Course ID: WR 449

Course Title: Critical Reviewing

Section: 1

CRN: 19424

Instructor Name: Biespiel

Day: MWF

Time: 1200-1250

Course Description: This course offers students an inside track to writing and publishing book reviews about new fiction, memoir, creative nonfiction, journalism, literary studies, history, poetry, and more. What is the role of the book reviewer? What is the role of book reviews? What are the latest issues, opportunities, and pitfalls facing the contemporary book critic? We’ll be studying various lengths for reviewing books and practicing these approaches. We’ll be getting to know the book reviewing landscape, from online to print, as well as assessing the growth of book reviewing in contemporary literary culture. We’ll be meeting via Skype with current and former book review editors of major periodicals who can offer insights about the landscape of writing about books for publication—including telling us “what they’re looking for in a book review.” We’ll be interviewing contemporary book critics. Above all, our primary focus will be writing dynamic, readable, thoughtful book reviews. Practical applications include: querying editors of publications, developing strategies forwriting and placing reviews, and handing the writing of shorter vs. longer reviews. Students should prepare for a lively, discussion-focused class with several writing assignments, writing experiments, creative revision, and, for the graduates, presentation about book+reviews of recent publications.

 

 

Course ID: WR 475

Course Title: The Rhetorics of Race

Section: 1

CRN: 19425

Instructor Name: Ribero

Day: TR

Time: 1000-1120

Course Description: By exploring the interrelated concepts of race, racialization, and racism, Rhetorics of Race problematizes race as a taken-for-granted phenomenon. Through reading, writing, and discussion, we study racial formations as historically specific and analyze contemporary forms of racism in the US. As rhetoricians, we pay close attention to how rhetoric and discourse have the power to reproduce and challenge white supremacy and race-based oppressions. Emphasizing the intersectionality of oppression—that racism necessarily takes place at intersections with other forms of subordination including sexism, homophobia, ablelism, etc.—Rhetorics of Race draws from Queer Black Feminism, Chican@ Feminism, and Critical Race Theory.

 

 

Course ID: WR 497

Course Title: Digital Literacy and Culture

Section: 1

CRN: 17798

Instructor Name: Kelly

Day: MWF

Time: 1400-1450

Course Description: Digital Literacy and Culture examines the relationships between human expression and the technologies we use to mediate those expressions. This class will explore the various literacy practices that shape our experiences of writing, thinking, and meaning-making in this age of information. We will trace the historical and cultural lineages of digital technologies, thinking through the ways that social networks, smartphones, and, artificial intelligence, and digitized mass media have reshaped the means and ends of cultural production.