For students, extracurricular involvement in the School of Psychological Science is essential if you are thinking about graduate school. Without research experience and faculty mentorship, getting into a graduate program (in psychology or elsewhere) is very difficult.

The School of Psychological Science, however, provides valuable opportunities for research experience in psychological science, so much so that as a student you can have the opportunity to be published or attend a national conference. This page is dedicated to the efforts of our undergraduate researchers, and their collaboration with Psychological Science faculty.

Here are a few examples of some of the work that has gone on in our research labs, in subject matter ranging from cognition to nonverbal behavior, stress and coping, mood and cognition, and social cognition, to name a few.
To review the work going on in the labs, visit sites dedicated to cognition, nonverbal behavior, stress and coping, mood and cognition, and social cognition.

Faculty/Student Collaboration

Following is a listing of publications and presentations involving collaboration between our students and faculty (student names are in bold lettering). 

Allen, P.A., Edwards, J. A., Snyder, F., Makinson, K.A., & Hamby, D. M.  (in press). The Effect of Cognitive Load on Decision-Making with Graphically Displayed Uncertainty Information. Risk Analysis.

Lien, M.-C., Ruthruff, E., & Kuhns, D. (in press). On the difficulty of task switching: Assessing the role of task-set inhibition. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review.

Falkenstein, A., & Edwards, J.A.  (January, 2013).  Lovingkindness meditation and prosocial construct accessibility.  Poster presented at the 2013 meetings of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, New Orleans, LA.

S.R. Saturn.  L.R. Saslow, W. Piper, O.P. John, D. Keltner. (2013)  Genetic Approaches to Studying Prosociality:  An Oxytocin Receptor Genetic Variation Relates to Facets of the Big Five Personality Domains. Society for Personality and Social Psychology Symposium: New Answers To Old Questions: Novel Approaches to the Study of Human Prosociality.

Edwards, J. A., Snyder, F., Allen, P. A., Makinson, K. A., & Hamby, D. M.  (2012).  Decision making for risk management: A comparison of graphical methods for presenting quantitative uncertainty.  Risk Analysis, 32, 2055-2070.

Helzer, E., & Edwards, J. A.  (2012).  Causal Uncertainty and Global versus Local Thinking. Social Cognition, 30, 519-536.

Edwards, J. A., Allen, P.A., Snyder, F., Falkenstein, A.Morris, M., Makinson, K., Hamby, D.  A comparison of methods of presenting probability information to decision makers.  (January, 2012).  Paper presented at the 2012 meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, San Diego, CA.

Jardin, E., Lien, M.-C., & Proctor, R. (2012). An electrophysiological study of object-based correspondence effects: Is visual processing modulated by the intended action? Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Minneapolis, MN. November 16th.

J. Garrison, W. Piper, & S.R. Saturn. Self-compassion’s Association with Prosocial Profiles and Well-Being. (2012) The Science of Compassion: Origins, Measures and Interventions.

Naylor, J., Lien, M.-C., & Ruthruff, E. (2012). Assessing capture following a switch in search strategy: Evidence for a breakdown of top-down control. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Minneapolis, MN. November 17th.

Pollock, J., Khoja, N., Lien, M.-C., & Allen, P. (2012). Electrophysiological evidence for differential age differences in emotion perception. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Minneapolis, MN. November 17th.

Lien, M.-C., Allen, P. A., & Crawford, C. (2012). Electrophysiological evidence of different loci for case mixing and word frequency effects in visual word recognition.  Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 19, 677-684.

Allen, P. A., & Edwards, J. A.  (January, 2010).  The Buddhist theory of karma:  Prosocial behavior affects perceptions of others.  Poster presented at the 2010 SPSP preconference on the Psychology of Religion and Spirituality, Las Vegas, NV.