Professor
evan.gottlieb@oregonstate.edu

Office: 541-737-1654

Moreland Hall

Moreland Hall 326

2550 SW Jefferson Way

2550 SW Jefferson Way
Corvallis, OR 97331
Credentials: 
Ph. D. University at Buffalo, SUNY 2002
M.A. University at Buffalo, SUNY 2000
B.A. McMaster University (Canada) 1997
Honors and Awards: 

Visiting International Scholar, School of Critical Studies, University of Glasgow, May-June 2018

Robert J. Frank Research, Scholarship, and Creativity Award, College of Liberal Arts, OSU, 2015

Fellow, Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities, University of Edinburgh, summer 2014

Profile Field Tabs

At OSU
Affiliated with: 
Sch of Wrtg Lit & Film
Courses Taught: 

Fall 2020 -- 

ENG 575: Introduction to Affect Theory

 

Spring 2020 --

ENG 108: Introduction to Science Fiction and Fantasy

ENG 345: Introduction to Literary and Critical Theory

 

Research/Career Interests: 

Eighteenth-century and Romantic British literature and culture; literary and critical theory; globalization; post-humanism and Speculative Realism

Selected Publications:

Monographs:

  • Engagements with Contemporary Literary and Critical Theory (Routledge, 2020)
  • Romantic Realities: Speculative Realism and British Romanticism (Edinburgh University Press, 2016)
  • Romantic Globalism: British Literature and Modern World Order, 1750-1830 (Ohio State University Press, 2014)
  • Walter Scott and Contemporary Theory (Bloomsbury, 2013)
  • Feeling British: Sympathy and National Identity in Scottish and English Writing, 1707-1832 (Bucknell University Press, 2007)

Editions and Edited Collections:

  • The Expedition of Humphry Clinker by Tobias Smollett, 2nd ed. (W.W. Norton, 2015)
  • Global Romanticism: Origins, Orientations, Engagements (Bucknell University Press, 2015)
  • Representing Place in British Literature and Culture, 1660-1830: From Local to Global, co-edited with Juliet Shields (Ashgate, 2013)
  • Approaches to Teaching Scott’s Waverley Novels (MLA, 2010)

I am currently writing a chapter on "Romanticism and Globalization" for the forthcoming Cambridge History of European Romanticism (ed. Patrick Vincent), as well as planning future work on utopian/ dystopian formations and the role of contingency in literature and theory.