In the Oregon State Guide to English Literary Terms, our professors define common literary devices and offer short lessons on how to use them in essays and other forms of literary criticism. The series is designed to be a free, online teaching resource for high school English teachers and college and high school English students, offering them tools to engage meaningfully with challenging literary texts.

If you would like to read the full transcripts of our videos, please click on their titles and you will be directed to pages dedicated to each term. To support teachers as they transition to remote learning / distance learning platforms during the current COVID-19 crisis, we've also added a few suggestions at the end of each transcript for further thinking and reading.

If you enjoyed our videos, show us some love by subscribing to our YouTube channel and by liking, sharing, and commenting on these videos.  Please also feel free to suggest other terms that you would like us to explain in the comments section of a video. Doing so will help us to build a rich digital learning environment around topics relevant to literary studies. 

 

"What is a Prologue?"

"What is a Prologue?": An Introduction to the Oregon State Guide to English Literary Terms

"What is Personification?" 


"What is Personification?": A Guide for English Students and Teachers

"What is a Flashback?"


"What is a Flashback?" A Guide for English Students and Teachers

"What is a Stanza?"

 

"What is a Stanza?": A Guide for English Students and Teachers

"What is Stream of Consciousness?"

"What is Stream of Consciousness?": A Guide for English Students and Teachers

"What is Figurative Language?"

"What is Figurative Language?" A Guide for English Students and Teachers

"What is Irony?"

"What is Irony?": A Guide for English Students and Teachers

 "What is a Metaphor?" 

"What is a Metaphor?" A Guide for English Students and Teachers

 

"What is Hyperbole?" 

"What is Hyperbole?" A Guide for English Students and Teachers

 

"What is an Unreliable Narrator?"

"What is an Unreliable Narrator?" A Guide for English Students and Teachers

"What is a Simile?" 

"What is a Simile?": A Guide for English Students and Teachers

 

"What is Metonymy?" 

"What is Metonymy?" A Guide for English Students and Teachers

 

"What is Synecdoche?" 

"What is Synecdoche?" A Guide for English Students and Teachers

 

"What is a Sonnet?" 

"What is a Sonnet?" A Guide for English Essays

 

"What is Imagery?" 

"What is Imagery?" A Guide for English Essays

 

"What is Enjambment?" 

"What is Enjambment?" A Guide for English Students and Teachers

 

"What is Satire?" 

"What is Satire?" A Guide for English Students and Teachers

 

"What is Juxtaposition?" 

"What is Juxtaposition?" A Guide for English Students and Teachers

 

"What is Foreshadowing?"

"What is Foreshadowing?" A Guide for English Students and Teachers

"What is Understatement?"

"What is Understatement? A Guide for English Students and Teachers

"What is Rhyme?"

"What is Rhyme?" A Guide for English Students and Teachers

 

What is a Narrative Arc?

"What is a Narrative Arc?": A Guide for English Students and Teachers

What is a Genre?

"What is a Genre?": A Literary Guide for English Students and Teachers

 

What is a Narrator?

"What is a Narrator?": A Literary Guide for English Students and Teachers

What is a Flat vs a Round Character?

"What is a Flat Character vs a Round Character?": A Literary Guide for English Students and Teachers

What is Symbolism?

"What is Symbolism?": A Guide for English Teachers and Students

What is a Graphic Narrative? (Part I)

"What is a Graphic Narrative?": A Literary Guide for English Students and Teachers

 

What is a Graphic Narrative? (Part II)

"What is a Graphic Narrative? Part II": A Literary Guide for English Students and Teachers

We are hard at work producing more videos on subjects such as allegory, soliloquy, nonfiction, and parody, and we will be publishing them throughout 2020, so please subscribe to our YouTube channel to keep up with the series.

If you are an English teacher, we'd love to get your suggestions for other subjects that might be suitable for our series.  Please post a comment on one of our videos or our YouTube main page with your recommendations.